Author Archives: Paul McNamara

About Paul McNamara

Nurse, educator & social media enthusiast. Loves AFL (Go Adelaide!), hates cotton wool. More info at meta4RN.com

When it’s illegal to be ethical

Australians have rated Nurses as the most ethical and honest profession each year for 21 years in a row (1994-2015) source. Whether nurses deserve that reputation or not, I’m pleased that the other stereotypes of nursing (eg: selfless angel, sexy nurse, Nurse Ratched, subservient nurse, murderous nurse, zombie nurse, etc) haven’t overwhelmed the public perception that most of us are honest and ethical.

“Ethical and honest” is a pretty good reputation for the nursing profession to have. A reputation to be proud of. A reputation worth defending.

These organisations are cosignatories to a media statement calling for amendments to Australian Border Force Act 2015 https://meta4rn.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/150620-joint-statement-australian-health-groups-call-for-australian-border-force-act-to-be-amended.pdf

These organisations are cosignatories to a media statement calling for amendments to Australian Border Force Act 2015 https://meta4rn.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/150620-joint-statement-australian-health-groups-call-for-australian-border-force-act-to-be-amended.pdf

As per media statements released over the last few days [here, here and here], it may soon become illegal to be ethical and honest for nurses, doctors and allied health staff working in Australia’s immigration detention centres.

Australian Border Force Act 2015 acts to silence honesty and to out-trump ethics with a threat of two years jail for advocating for patients. This is very dangerous territory.

Toni Hoffman Australian of the Year Awards 2006. Image source: http://www.australianoftheyear.org.au

Toni Hoffman Australian of the Year Awards 2006. Image source: http://www.australianoftheyear.org.au

Less than a decade ago a nurse in Bundaberg, Toni Hoffman, was commended in a Queensland Public Hospitals Commission of Inquiry thus:

I would also like to pay tribute to certain people whose care, passion or courage was instrumental in bringing to light the matters covered here. First and foremost of those is Ms Hoffman. She might easily have doubted herself, or succumbed to certain pressures to work within a system that was not responsive. She might have chosen to quarantine herself from Dr Patel’s influence by leaving the Base or at least the Intensive Care Unit. Instead, and under the threat of significant detriment to herself, Ms Hoffman persistently and carefully documented the transgressions of Dr Patel.

For being ethical and honest Toni Hoffman won some praise and copped a whole heap of flak. Only Toni can tell us whether her personal costs were offset by the public benefits. However, if a nurse working in any of Australia’s detention centres is faced with comparable ethical concerns, speaking honestly about it could cost them two years in prison.

That’s a high cost to pay.

What’s the sense in making it illegal to be ethical?

End

As always, your comments are welcome below. If I’ve totally misunderstood the legislation and you can explain to me how preventing health professionals from advocating for their patients is a good idea, you’re VERY welcome to leave a comment.

Paul McNamara, 20th June 2015
Short URL: meta4RN.com/ethical

 

 

 

We Bald Nurses

This might be the shortest blog post in the history of humans – it’s a list of bald nurses on Twitter. So far I know of three six:

Ian Miller aka @TheNursePath

Sean Dent aka @iamunafraid

Jesse Spurr aka @Inject_Orange

Austyn Snowden aka @AustynSnowden

Kelsey David Burnham aka @EnlightenedAss

Paul McNamara (me) aka @meta4RN

The proposed #WeBaldNurses motto is Herba non adnatus occupatus platea – the Latin version of “Grass does not grow on a busy street”.

bald-headNursing gentlemen who have heads eschewed of hair are a minority amongst a minority, and need to stick together.

I hope to find more of us – please let me know of anyone who should be added to the list via the comments section below, or via Twitter using the #WeBaldNurses hashtag. I will update the list above PRN.

That’s it for now… a big shout-out to all the nurses out there who are not frittering their money away on shampoo, conditioner, brushes and combs.

Paul McNamara
Originally posted 30th May 2015
short URL meta4RN.com/WeBaldNurses

Updated: 31/05/15, 01/06/15

 

 

 

Fun Facts re Nursing and Midwifery

To celebrate International Nurses Day 2015 here is a list of fun facts as they pertain to Nursing and Midwifery. Each fact is of a Tweetable (is that a word?) length, and cites the website from where the fact was attained.

IMG_5639

12th May = Florence Nightingale’s birthday = International Nurses Day. 
Source: http://www.icn.ch/publications/2015-nurses-a-force-for-change-care-effective-cost-effective/

Florence Nightingale was named after the city in which she was born (Florence, Italy).
Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/timelines/z92hsbk

Amongst Florence Nightingale’s achievements was the introduction of female nurses into military hospitals. Yes, female nurses. 
Source: http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/the-collection/biography.html

Florence Nightingale was a talented statistician who invented a variation of the pie graph.
Source: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/florence-nightingale-passionate-statistician

IND_2015_Eng_posterAs at December 2014 there were 326,782 practicing Nurses + Midwives in Australia.
Source: http://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/News/Newsletters/March-2015.aspx#quarterlystats numbers: 262,636 registered nurses + 60,755 enrolled nurses + 3,391 midwife-only registrations =  326,782

Of Australia’s 32,956 Midwives, 29,620 of them are also Nurses. That’s 89.9%.
Source: http://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/News/Newsletters/March-2015.aspx#quarterlystats numbers: 3,391 midwives+ 30,199 people registered as both a midwife and either a registered nurse and/or an enrolled nurse

Only 0.9% of Australia’s Nurses and Midwives are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (2013 figures). 
Source: http://www.aihw.gov.au/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery/who-are-they/

logo-1

72% of Australia’s Nurses and Midwives earned their first qualification in Australia.
Source: http://www.aihw.gov.au/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery/who-are-they/

90% of Australia’s Nurses and Midwives are Clinicians, 3.5% are Educators.
Source: http://www.aihw.gov.au/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery/who-are-they/

56% of Australia’s Nurses are aged 50 and over. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. 
Source: http://www.aihw.gov.au/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery/who-are-they/

29% of Australia’s Mental Health Nurses are aged 55 and over. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.
Source: http://www.mentalhealthcommission.gov.au/media/119868/Fact%20Sheet%2012%20-%20What%20this%20means%20for%20workforce%20and%20research%20capacity.pd

An Australian company, Ausmed Education, host an online guide to Twitter for Spanish-speaking Nurses.
Sources: http://www.ausmed.com.au/es/twitter-para-enfermeras/http://www.ausmed.com.au/twitter-for-nurses/

Ausmed_Education-Logo

Nine Nurses were on included on the 2015 Australia Day Honours List. 
Source: http://meta4RN.com/honours15

The Catholic Patron Saint of Mental Health Nurses is Dymphna.
Source: http://meta4rn.com/dymphna

In Australia, 89.6% of Nurses are female, as are 69% of Mental Health Nurses and 98.2% of Midwives.
Sources: http://www.aihw.gov.au/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery/http://www.mentalhealthcommission.gov.au/media/119868/Fact%20Sheet%2012%20-%20What%20this%20means%20for%20workforce%20and%20research%20capacity.pdfhttp://www.aihw.gov.au/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery/who-are-they/ 

In Australia, 10.4% of Nurses are male, as are 31% of Mental Health Nurses and 1.8% of Midwives.
Sources: http://www.aihw.gov.au/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery/ + http://www.mentalhealthcommission.gov.au/media/119868/Fact%20Sheet%2012%20-%20What%20this%20means%20for%20workforce%20and%20research%20capacity.pdf + http://www.aihw.gov.au/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery/who-are-they/ 

57.4% of Australia’s Nurses and Midwives have a main job that is hospital-based.
Source: http://meteor.aihw.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/586921 Table 10

42.6% of Australia’s Nurses and Midwives main job that is not based in a hospital.
Source: http://meteor.aihw.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/586921 Table 10

Australia’s registering body does not recognise any Nursing Specialities, but recognises 23 Medical Specialities.
Sources: http://meta4RN.com/credhttp://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au + http://www.medicalboard.gov.au

Only one state in Australia (Queensland) has a program  that aims for all Nurses working Mental Health to be Mental Health Nurses. 
Source: http://www.acmhn.org/credentialing/qld-credentialing-project

Print

The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation is Australia’s largest health union.
Source: http://anmf.org.au/news/entry/review-must-strengthen-not-dismantle-medicare 

The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation is the second largest trade union in Australia. 
Source: http://www.thepowerindex.com.au/contenders/australia-s-15-most-powerful-union-heavies

Australians have rated Nurses as the most ethical and honest profession each year for 21 years in a row (1994-2015). 
Source: http://www.roymorgan.com/findings/6188-roy-morgan-image-of-professions-2015-201504280343

logo

A list of Australia’s blogging Nurses is maintained by NurseUncut.
Source: http://www.nurseuncut.com.au/blog-roll/

There are over 50 separate Nursing Organisations in Australia.
Sources: http://meta4RN.com/colleges + http://www.conno.org.au/members + http://www.nurseinfo.com.au/links.html

 

End

That will do for now. I plan to Tweet each of these fun facts out on International Nurse Day using the #IND2015 hashtag. Do you know of any fun facts that I’ve missed? If so, please add them in comments section below, and I’ll include them on the list.

Paul McNamara, 12th May 2015
Short URL: meta4RN.com/FunFacts 

 

Nurses with Cred

Last week, after a fair bit of a nudge, Australia’s federal government made the National Review of Mental Health Programs and Services available. This infographic from the report caught my eye:

That nursing is the largest single component of Australia’s mental health workforce isn’t a surprise. What is a bit unsettling is that the big bubble with 19,048 in it is mislabeled as “Total mental health nurses”.

That’s not true.

Working in mental health does not make you a mental health nurse, in the same way as driving through Bathurst does not make you a racing car driver. Just because you have a basic licence and you are in the right setting, it doesn’t mean you have the skills to perform safely at a high standard. It doesn’t mean you have cred.

As per AHPRA’s Nursing and Midwifery Board there is no registration category for a specialist mental health nurse, there are only these types of registration:

  1. Registered nurse
  2. Enrolled nurse
  3. Midwife

Compare this with types of registration listed by AHPRA’s Medical Board (sub-speciality fields and full range of speciality titles not included):

  1. Addiction medicine
  2. Anaesthesia
  3. Dermatology
  4. Emergency medicine
  5. General practice
  6. Intensive care medicine
  7. Medical administration
  8. Obstetrics and gynaecology
  9. Occupational and environmental medicine
  10. Ophthalmology
  11. Paediatrics and child health
  12. Pain medicine
  13. Palliative medicine
  14. Pathology
  15. Physician
  16. Psychiatry
  17. Public health medicine
  18. Radiation oncology
  19. Radiology
  20. Rehabilitation medicine
  21. Sexual health medicine
  22. Sport and exercise medicine
  23. Surgery

Medicine and nursing do not correlate on every detail of specialisation, but still… why such a big disparity between the two in terms of registration? Australians have rated Nurses as the most ethical and honest profession each year for 21 years in a row (1994-2015) [source], but I wonder if the public is aware of a problem with nursing specialities not being given the similar recognition as medical specialities.

Midwives have made their speciality distinctly different in the eyes of the public and other health professionals. I am sure it is a comfort for many expectant parents to know that the person guiding you through pregnancy, labour, childbirth and early parenthood is a qualified specialist and is acknowledged and registered as such.

However, people receiving support/treatment for a mental health condition will not necessarily have a specialist mental health nurse providing that service. It’s quite the opposite of midwifery – the nurse providing care may have no specialised qualifications in mental health. I wonder how service users and the people who love them feel about that.

I’ve been a medical, surgical and high-dependency/ICU nurse, and have worked closely with Midwives. I can tell you with confidence that mental health nursing is as different from general nursing as midwifery is. There are some transferable skills, of course, but midwifery, general nursing and mental health nursing each have a completely different model of care, and a very different way of working with people.

It’s not all doom and gloom though: the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses (ACMHN) have a process to credential suitably qualified and experienced mental health nurses.  In the absence of AHPRA being able to discriminate the difference between a general nurse and a mental health nurse, ACMHN are essentially saying, “Leave it to us. We will tell you who is a mental health nurse and who is not.” To be credentialed by the ACMHN, applicants must demonstrate that they:

  1. Hold a current licence to practice as a registered nurse within Australia
  2. Hold a recognised specialist / post-graduate mental health nursing qualification
  3. Have had at least 12 months experience since completing specialist / postgraduate qualification OR have three years experience as a registered nurse working in mental health
  4. Have been practicing within the last three years
  5. Have acquired minimum continuing professional development points for education and practice
  6. Are supported by two professional referees
  7. Have completed a professional declaration agreeing to uphold the standards of the profession. [source]

QHcredential_Page_27There’s more good news: Queensland Health has set targets to work towards a fully qualified, fully credentialed mental health nursing workforce. I wonder if other state health departments are thinking about implementing a similar strategy. It might be important: a program staffed entirely by Credentialed Mental Health Nurses was described as “one of the most innovative services ever funded” [source].

Credentialing + Ability = Credibility.

Credentialed Mental Health Nurses have Cred.

One last thing. It is encouraging that mental health is not the only nursing speciality in Australia that is setting the standard, for saying, “We the specialist nurses will tell you who is a specialist nurse and who is not”.  Under the Credentialing for Nurses initiative, currently there are six specialty nursing organisations working collaboratively to develop consistent, evidence based, recognition for specialist nurses:

  1. Australian College of Operating Room Nurses
  2. Australian College of Children and Young People’s Nurses
  3. Australian College of Mental Health Nurses
  4. College of Emergency Nursing Australasia
  5. Gastroenterological Nurses College of Australia
  6. Palliative Care Nurses Australia

Every speciality area of nursing,  every healthcare organisation, and every patient needs the same thing: Nurses with Cred.

End

That’s it, as always your comments are welcome.

Paul McNamara, 28th April 2015

Short URL: http://meta4RN.com/cred

References

Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, 2015: Credentialing for Practice Program

Corderoy, Amy. (2015, 25th April). Innovative mental health program falling victim to funding freeze. Sydney Morning Herald

Credentialing for Nurses

National Mental Health Commission, 2014: The National Review of Mental Health Programmes and Services. Sydney: NMHC

Roy Morgan Research. (2015, 28th April). Roy Morgan Image of Professions Survey 2015: Nurses still easily most highly regarded. Finding No. 6188

 

 

Health Professionalism and Digital Citizenship

This post is the companian peice to a Prezi of the same name, and serves mostly as a collection point for references and thanks.

Prezi

The Prezi is intended as an oral presentation, so I do not intend to include a full description of the content here. After watching the Prezi/hearing the presentation regular visitors to meta4RN.com will recognise some familiar themes. Let’s not call it self-plagarism (such an ugly term), I would rather think of it as a new, funky remix of a favourite old song. Due to this remixing of old content I’ve included previous meta4RN.com blog posts on the reference list.

I am more than just a bit embarrassed at how self-referential the Prezi/my presentation is. Not only does this make me look like a total narcissist, it also calls the credibility of the presentation into question. I’ll need to cop those criticisms on the chin until more Australian mental health nurses provide examples of professional use of social media. When that happens, I intend to replace some of the meta4RN content of the Prezi with that of other Australian mental health nurses.

MediaTrad

Thanks

Thanks to all those who contributed to the Prezi/presentation either directly or indirectly. There are too many to name at the moment [I have a deadline looming], but you’ll see glimpses of their names and faces on Twitter, Blogs and Facebook as you look through the Prezi. These are some of the people that make using social media such a pleasure. When I have time, I intend to come back and list all the contributors below:

 

MediaSocial

 

References for Prezi “Health Professionalism and Digital Citizenship” prezi.com/at84cig99fij/health-professionalism-and-digital-citizenship/

Australian College of Nursing (n.d.) Social media guidelines for nurses. Retreived from http://www.rcna.org.au/WCM/…for_nurses.pdf

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. (2014, March 17). Social media policy. Retrieved from http://www.ahpra.gov.au/News/2014-02-13-revised-guidelines-code-and-policy.aspx

Casella, E., Mills, J., & Usher, K. (2014). Social media and nursing practice: Changing the balance between the social and technical aspects of work. Collegian, 21(2), 121–126. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2014.03.005

Citizen Kane DVD cover. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.currentfilm.com/dvdreviews4/citizenkanedvd.html

Facebook. (2015). Facebook logo. Retrieved from https://www.facebookbrand.com/
Ferguson, C., Inglis, S. C., Newton, P. J., Cripps, P. J. S., Macdonald, P. S., & Davidson, P. M. (2014).

Social media: A tool to spread information: A case study analysis of Twitter conversation at the Cardiac Society of Australia & New Zealand 61st Annual Scientific Meeting 2013. Collegian, 21(2), 89–93. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2014.03.002

Instagram. (2015). Instagram logo. Retrieved from https://help.instagram.com/304689166306603

Li, C. (2015). Charlene Li photo. Retrieved from http://www.charleneli.com/about-charlene/reviewer-resources/

lifeinthefastlane. (2013). #FOAMed logo. Retrieved from http://lifeinthefastlane.com/foam/

McNamara, P., & Meijome, X. M. (2015). Twitter Para Enfermeras (Spanish/Español). Retrieved 11 March 2015, from http://www.ausmed.com.au/es/twitter-para-enfermeras/

McNamara, P. (2014). A Nurse’s Guide to Twitter. Retrieved from http://www.ausmed.com.au/twitter-for-nurses/

McNamara, P. (2014, May 3) Luddites I have known. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/luddites

McNamara, P. (2013) Behave online as you would in real life (letter to the editor), TQN: The Queensland Nurse, June 2013, Volume 32, Number 3, Page 4.

McNamara, P. (2013, October 25) Professional use of Twitter and healthcare social media. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/NPD100

McNamara, P. (2013, October 23) A Twitter workshop in tweets. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/tweets

McNamara, P. (2013, October 1) Professional use of Twitter. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/poster

McNamara, P. (2013, July 21) Follow Friday and other twitterisms. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/FF

McNamara, P. (2013, June 7) Omnipresent and always available: A mental health nurse on Twitter. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/twit

McNamara, P. (2013, January 20) Social media for nurses: my ten-step, slightly ranty, version. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/rant1

Moorley, C., & Chinn, T. (2014). Using social media for continuous professional development. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 71(4), 713–717. doi:10.1111/jan.12504

New South Wales Nurses and Midwives Association [nswnma]. (2014, July 30). Women now have unmediated access to public conversation via social media for 1st time in history @JaneCaro #NSWNMAconf14 #destroythejoint [Tweet]. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/nswnma/status/494313737575096321

New South Wales nurses and Midwives’ Association. (2014). NSW Nurses & Midwives Association logo. Retrieved from http://housingstressed.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/NSWNMA.png

Nickson, C. P., & Cadogan, M. D. (2014). Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) for the emergency physician. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26(1), 76–83. doi:10.1111/1742-6723.12191

Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (2010, September 9) Information sheet on social media. Retrieved from http://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD10%2F3224&dbid=AP&chksum=qhog9%2FUCgKdssFmA0XnBlA%3D%3D

Twitter. (2015). Twitter logo. Retrieved from https://about.twitter.com/press/brand-assets

Wall Media. (2015). Jane Caro photo. Retrieved from http://wallmedia.com.au/jane-caro/

Wilson, R., Ranse, J., Cashin, A., & McNamara, P. (2014). Nurses and Twitter: The good, the bad, and the reluctant. Collegian, 21(2), 111–119. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2013.09.003

WordPress. (2015). WordPress logo. Retrieved from https://wordpress.org/about/logos/

Wozniak, H., Uys, P., & Mahoney, M. J. (2012). Digital communication in a networked world. In J.

Higgs, R. Ajjawi, L. McAllister, F. Trede, & S. Loftus (Eds.), Communication in the health sciences (3rd ed., pp. 150–162). South Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

YouTube. (2015). YouTube logo. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/yt/brand/downloads.html

End 

That’s it. As always your comments are welcome.

Paul McNamara, 14th March 2015

 

Nurses on the 2015 Australia Day Honours List

Extracting information available via gg.gov.au/australia-day-2015-honours-list, below are the Nurses I found on the 2015 Australia Day Honours List.

Diane Mary Brown AO
Officer (AO) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Drummoyne NSW
For distinguished service to nursing through the delivery of quality care, professional development and nursing education, and to the international advancement of the profession throughout Asia and the South Pacific.
Project Director, Sister Hospital Program, Sanglah General Hospital, Denpasar, Bali and Royal Darwin Hospital, since 2012. Education Consultant, World Bank Indonesia, 2012 (Mid-term evaluation of the national Health Professional Education project to strengthen nursing and midwifery education). Volunteer, Sanglah General Hospital, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia, Australian Volunteers International (AVI), 2009-2011. Invited Visiting Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Indonesia, since 2007. Invited Scholar, Centre for Evidence-Based Health Care, Bergen University College, Norway, 2006. Short term international consultant, World Health Organisation, Banda Aceh, Indonesia, 2005. Project Director, Binawan Institute of Health Sciences, Jakarta, Indonesia, 2003-2005 (development of an ‘International’ standard Bachelor of Nursing). Team Leader, Sister School Program, Central Kalimantan, Indonesian part of Borneo, World Bank, 2001-2004 (Project designed to improve the health of the Indonesian people through improving human resources in the education of health service personnel). Executive District Director of Nursing, Mount Isa Health Service District (now North West Hospital and Health Service), 2007-2008. Director, Clinical Nursing Practice Development, Northern Sydney Health Service, 2004. Various clinical nursing roles including Nursing Unit Manager, Night Supervisor and Nurse Practitioner, 1984-1990. Various nursing positions including 10 months with Bush Nursing Service, Western Australia; 9 year’s experience working in Critical Care (ICU and A&E) in a number of Sydney teaching hospitals including: St Vincent’s; Sydney; Royal Prince Alfred; Lewisham; Hornsby: and Mater Misericordiae, 1973-1984. Professorial Fellow, Charles Darwin University, current. Education Consultant, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, 2011 (Mid-term evaluation; the Strategic Development of Nursing through Nursing Education in Viet Nam); External Examiner, Faculty of Health. Professor of Nursing, World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre, Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, University of Technology Sydney, 2008-2009; Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning), 1998-2004; Acting Dean, 2001-2002; Senior Lecturer/Lecturer, 1991-1998; External Supervisor and Examiner. Professor of Clinical Nursing, Charles Darwin University and Department of Health and Community Services Northern Territory, 2005-2007. Professor Brown has published a number of papers, books and chapters including: ‘International partnerships and the development of a sister hospital program’ in ‘International Nursing Review’, 2013 (Co-author). ‘Lewis’ Medical-Surgical Nursing (4th Edition)’, 2015 (Co-editor). ‘Changing Perioperative Practice in an Indonesian Hospital: Parts I and II’, in ‘Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses Journal’, 2011 (Co-author). ‘Clinically Speaking: a communication skills program for students from non-English speaking backgrounds’, in ‘Nurse Education Today’, 2006. ‘Final Report. Development of Sister School Program for Nursing and Midwifery Schools in Kaliamantan’, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Central Kalimantan, Republic of Indonesia, 2004. Member, Australian College of Nursing, since 2012; Reviewer, ‘Collegian’, 2001-2007. Member, The College of Nursing (now Australian College of Nursing), 1978-2012. Member, Royal College of Nursing (now Australian College of Nursing, 2009-2012. Associate Fellow, Australian College of Health Service Managers, current. Member, Australian Orthopaedic Outreach, current. Reviewer, ‘International Nursing Review’, International Council of Nurses, current.

Rosemary Elizabeth Dalton OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Castle Hill NSW
For service to nursing, and to medical education.
Clinical Nurse Consultant, Amputee Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, 1979-1995. Lecturer, NSW College of Nursing, many years. Lecturer, School of Medicine, Sydney University, many years. Distinguished Nursing Service Award, Royal Australian College of Nursing, 1995.

Robyn Louise Dealtry OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
East Toowoomba Qld
For service to nursing, and to medical education.
Clinical Nurse Consultant, Acute Pain Services, Toowoomba Hospital, Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service, since 2007. Recovery Room Nurse, St Andrew’s Hospital – Toowoomba, 2005 – 2008. Independent Pain Consultant, 2004 – 2007. Clinical Nurse Specialist, Westmead Hospital, Western Sydney Area Health Service, Clinical Nurse Consultant Grade 3 Multidisciplinary Pain Service, 1991- 2004; Team Leader, 1991 – 2004; Clinical Nurse Specialist, 1991 – 1993; Registered Nurse/Clinical Nurse Specialist, 1985 – 1991; Registered Nurse, Course, 1985. Staff Excellence Award, 1994. Registered Nurse, Anglican Retirement Village, South Australia, 1984 – 1985; Registered Nurse, Torrens Park Nursing Home, South Australia, 1979 – 1982. The College of Nursing – Pain Management: Distance Education Lecturer. Guest speaker, since 1994; Initiated and authored the first pain management distance education course, 1992. Team Member, National Institute of Clinical Studies, (NICS), National Pain Project, 2004. Conference Presenter, Australian and New Zealand Pain Society, 2003 and member. Member, Nurse Practitioner Peer Review Interview Panel, New South Wales Nurses Registration Board, 2003. Established, The Pain Interest Nursing Group, 1995. Conference Presenter, Cancer Nurses Association. Member, Australian Pain Society. Member, Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, current. Has presented at International Pain Management conferences in New Zealand, India, Malaysia, Singapore and Israel. Author of three national and one international journal articles and two international and one national book chapter.

Paul Anthony Gallagher OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Bangor NSW
For service to children through charitable paediatric care organisations.
Founding Member, Sydney Kids’ Committee, The Sydney Children’s Hospital, since 1993. Served 10 years as President. Nurse Manager, Newborn and Paediatric Emergency Transport Service, Sydney Children’s Hospital, since 2002. Board Member, Telstra Child Flight, 2008-2012. Nurse Manager, Department of Paediatrics, St George Hospital, 1995-2002. Paediatric Nurse, Sydney Children’s Hospital, 1989-2002. President, St Patrick’s College Football Club, since 2013; Executive Member; Club Member for 34 years. Junior Cricket Coach, St Patrick’s College Cricket Club, 2006-2009. Volunteer, Athlete Care Nurse, Sydney Olympic Games, 2000. Joint Squad Leader, U13 and U14 Nippers, North Cronulla Surf Life Saving Club, 2009-2011.

Barbara Maureen Mitchell OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Emu Plains NSW
For service to the international community of Bangladesh through humanitarian medical programs.
Aussi Bangla Smile Project: Co-Founder, since 2006. Fundraiser and Coordinator of 6 trips, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, and 2014. Volunteer Scrub Nurse, 4 trips. Founder, Emu Plains Chapter, ‘Days for Girls’ program, since 2014. (Program provides underprivileged girls in Bangladesh with reusable sanitary kits). Scrub Nurse, Nepean Public Hospital, 1998-2013. Scrub Nurse, Westmead Hospital, 1986-1998 and RN First Assistant Cardiac Theatre Nurse, 1996-1998. Honorary Member and Fundraising Volunteer, Rotary Club of Nepean.

Margaret Barbara O’Driscoll OAM 
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Alexandra Hills Qld
For service to the community, and to nursing.
Honorary Administrator, Historic Ormiston House, since 2003; Friends and Advisors Committee, Carmelite Sisters (Ormiston House owners) representative, since 2000. Cancer Council, Redlands Branch; Vice-Chairman, for many years; Secretary, for many years. Received Scholarships to study Oncology Nursing, and Palliative Care (London, New York and Florence). Blue Nursing Service – Redland: Director of Nursing, 1985-1995; Future Planning Committee, Nandeebie Retirement and Hostel Complex, 1980s and 1990s; Various Community Management Committees, many years.

Valerie Jean Rose OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Junabee Qld
For service to community health.
Member, Warwick Suicide Prevention Group, 10 years. Grief Support Group Coordinator. Member, Combined Churches Pastoral Care Team, Warwick Hospital. Nurse, Warwick Hospital and Killarney Hospital. Nurse, Mater Hospital, Brisbane. Teacher, Scots/PGC College, Warwick. School Counsellor, St Joseph’s College, Toowoomba. School Counsellor, St Saviour’s School, Toowoomba. Founding Member, Zonta, Warwick Branch. Parish Counsellor, St Mary’s Catholic Church, Warwick. Parishioner for many years. Committee Member, Safe Haven (Domestic Violence Support). Member, School Chaplaincy Committee, Warwick. Supporter of refugee families.

Janet Tyler OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Adelaide SA
For service to nursing, particularly in the field of spinal injury rehabilitation.
Acting Nurse Manager, Hampstead Rehabilitation Centre, 1986-1994. Clinical Nurse Co-Ordinator, 1977-1986; Assisted planning and upgrade of Spinal Injuries Unit – Morris Wards, 1973; Senior Registered Nurse, 1964-1977. Involved in establishing the acute and rehabilitation Spinal Cord Injury Service in South Australia (now known as South Australian Spinal Cord Injury Service-SASCIS), 1958. Member, Paraplegic and Quadriplegic Association of South Australia, since 1960s; Life Membership, 1977. Senior Nursing Member, Australian Medical Team, Para Olympic Games, Israel, 1968. Assistant Manager and Senior Nursing Member, Inaugural South Australian National Spinal Games, Hampstead Centre, 1964. Member then Associate Member, Australian Nurses Federation, many years. Life Member, Registered Nurse Association; Member, 1951-1994. Justice of the Peace, for over 30 years. Friend, Royal District Nursing Service of South Australia.

Gail Josephine Milner PSM
Public Service Medal (PSM)
Doubleview WA
For outstanding public service to community health and aged care reform in Western Australia, particularly through the establishment and implementation of innovative clinical programs.
Ms Milner has worked for WA Health in a variety of senior leadership roles since 1987. During this time she has held positions in health system reform, aged care and nursing. Ms Milner has been Operational Director of Innovation Health System and Reform since 2007. In her various roles she has engaged and worked closely with all health sectors including private, not for profit and other Government agencies at a local, State and National level including Silver Chain and St John Ambulance. Over her career with WA Health she has been committed to improving health service delivery in WA including leading, developing and implementing the Western Australian and Commonwealth Government’s National Partnership Agreement on Improving Public Hospitals Implementation Plan. She has also provided ongoing leadership and support of the Clinical Services Framework 2010-2020 which sets out the planned structure of health service provision in WA for the next 10 years. Ms Milner has led the development and implementation of the WA State Aged Care Plan, Dementia, Carers and Leadership Action Plans.

added as per suggestion in comments section:

Sandra Mahlberg
Australian Capital Territory
Humanitarian and volunteer
2015 National Finalist Senior Australian of the Year
Opening her heart and her home to sick children, Sandra Mahlberg is the ACT coordinator for Rotary Oceania Medical Aid for Children (ROMAC), a volunteer organisation that helps children from developing countries afflicted with severe medical conditions.  Sandra sources funding for accommodation and transport to and from Australia, draws on her wide network to seek voluntary contributions from surgeons and hospitals and coordinates the post-operative, pastoral care and selection of children who need corrective surgery for life-threatening but treatable conditions.  She works tirelessly through the National ROMAC committee and with the ACT Government to bring children to Australia from countries including China, East Timor, Fiji, Vanuatu and Solomon Islands – and she does this while maintaining her full time nursing job at Calvary Hospital.  Since 2006, Sandra has hosted 15 children and their guardians in her home, supporting them for up to a year at a time.  Putting service before self, Sandra’s commitment to humanitarian endeavour is changing lives and is reinforcing Australia’s reputation as a caring society. Source: www.australianoftheyear.org.au/honour-roll

 

Closing Notes

Please let me know if I missed any nurses or midwives. I’m happy to correct any oversights (not fully caffeinated yet).

Similarly, if you know of an online article that elaborates on the info above and/or has a photo of any of the Nurses on the 2015 Australia Day Honours List please let me know via the comments section below – I’d be happy to add a link to the article(s).

Finally, just to stop people teasing me as my wife is doing now (“What are you doing that for? Trying to get nominated for 2016?” – ha ha – very funny Stella), I have a simple explanation for collating the nurses here: I couldn’t find them collated elsewhere.

That’s it.

Paul McNamara, 26 January 2015

What does a Public Mental Health Service Look Like?

While developing a lecture to prepare nursing students for clinical experience in community mental health, I realised that some others may be interested to know what a public mental health service looks like. In the early 1990s I first gained mental health experience working across two aging purpose-built mental health facilities – Hillcrest Hospital and the beautiful Glenside Hospital (now being used by the South Australian Film Corporation). These facilities had started out as asylums where people were hidden away from the rest of the world behind Ha-Ha Walls and layers of misunderstanding and stigma: “the madhouse”, “the funny farm”, “the loony bin”, “the nuthouse” etc.

That’s not a very accurate (or kind) representation of a what a public mental health service looks like in Australia in 2015.

Parkside Lunatic Asylum then Glenside Hospital now SA Film Corp. Photo via http://www.weekendnotes.com/z-ward-glenside-hospital/

Parkside Lunatic Asylum then Glenside Hospital now SA Film Corp. Photo via http://www.weekendnotes.com/z-ward-glenside-hospital/

Let’s try to get our head around what a public mental health service actually looks like by deconstructing its elements. It’s not about grand old buildings any more; it’s about an array of services, most of which are community-based. I’ll deconstruct a mental health service I know a bit about, but to make it easy for myself I’m leaving out the “and Hinterland” part and some other details of the Cairns and Hinterland Mental Health Service. Hopefully this will give an overview of what components make-up a mental health service in a large regional city.

IMG_4645Red = primary intake points
Yellow = inpatient beds
Green = community (outpatient) teams

Primary Intake Points
ACT = Acute Care Team = assessment, crisis response and short-term intervention
ACT ED = as above, based in the Emergency Department of Cairns Hospital
CLPS = Consultation Liaison Psychiatry Service = mental health assessment, support and education in the general hospital setting (more about that here)

Inpatient Beds
Annex = Mental Health Unit (MHU) Annex (10 beds) = an offsite annex to the mainstream MHU for short-stay sub-acute admissions/transition to home
LDU = Low Dependency Unit of the MHU (approx 26 beds, I think, on site at Cairns Hospital) = average length of admission is about 12 days
SPA = Special Purpose Area of the MHU (4 beds on site at Cairns Hospital) = used for people with specific needs (eg: elderly, teenage, new parent)
PICU = Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (8 beds on site at Cairns Hospital) = an area of containment for people experiencing severe symptoms and/or behavioural concerns; usually short-stay

Community (Outpatient) Teams
CCT = Continuing Care Teams (3 teams: North, Central & South) = multidisciplinary recovery-focused teams that provide medium to long-term support to people in their homes and/or in community-based clinics
MIRT = Mobile Intensive Rehabilitation Team = a multidisciplinary recovery-focused team that provides medium-term intensive support to people experiencing significant psychiatric distress and/or disability
CYMHS = Child & Youth Mental Health Service = multidisciplinary team that provides assessment, support and treatment of young people (up to age 18) experiencing significant psychiatric symptoms
Evolve = Evolve Therapeutic Services = specialist multidisciplinary team for children/young people on child protection orders in out-of-home care, with severe/complex mental health support needs
OPMHS = Older Persons Mental Health Service = multidisciplinary team catering for older persons experiencing first-presentation psychiatric disorder or psychological and behavioural symptoms associated with a cognitive disorder
ATODS = Alcohol Tobacco & Other Drugs Service = multifaceted multidisciplinary team that provides free, confidential counselling and psychology services to anyone seeking help with alcohol and other drugs
Forensic = Forensic Mental Health = multifaceted multidisciplinary team that provides mental health assessment, support and treatment of people experiencing significant psychiatric symptoms and within, or at risk of being within, the corrective services system

Session 10 Lecture Part 1
Five things I want to emphasise:

  1. People receiving inpatient care make-up about 2% of the total amount of the people receiving mental health support at any given time. Public mental health services are community-based services; most people receiving support via a public mental health service have never been a hospital inpatient because of psychiatric problems and probably never will
  2. Mental health care is not just about a public mental health services: local GPs, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, mental health nurses and others are working in a wide variety of private and non-government organisations to support people in their recovery.
  3. It should be obvious by the intro and daggy look of my web page that I’m not representing the Cairns and Hinterland Mental Health Service here, but just to clarify: I’m not! If you’re feeling miffed or misled, please see points 10 and 13 on the meta4RN “About” page (here) or bypass me and go straight to the webpage for the Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service (here). Sorry for the confusion.
  4. I know that there a bits I’ve left out. I acknowledged that in the intro.
  5. This blog post is just a small excerpt of info that was included in a lecture for student nurses. If you’d like to see the lecture slides, here they are below:

That’s it. Thanks for visiting.

Paul McNamara, 18th January 2015.