Tag Archives: #SoMe (Social Media)

Health Professionalism and Digital Citizenship

This post is the companian peice to a Prezi of the same name, and serves mostly as a collection point for references and thanks.

Prezi

The Prezi is intended as an oral presentation, so I do not intend to include a full description of the content here. After watching the Prezi/hearing the presentation regular visitors to meta4RN.com will recognise some familiar themes. Let’s not call it self-plagarism (such an ugly term), I would rather think of it as a new, funky remix of a favourite old song. Due to this remixing of old content I’ve included previous meta4RN.com blog posts on the reference list.

I am more than just a bit embarrassed at how self-referential the Prezi/my presentation is. Not only does this make me look like a total narcissist, it also calls the credibility of the presentation into question. I’ll need to cop those criticisms on the chin until more Australian mental health nurses provide examples of professional use of social media. When that happens, I intend to replace some of the meta4RN content of the Prezi with that of other Australian mental health nurses.

MediaTrad

Thanks

Thanks to all those who contributed to the Prezi/presentation either directly or indirectly. There are too many to name at the moment [I have a deadline looming], but you’ll see glimpses of their names and faces on Twitter, Blogs and Facebook as you look through the Prezi. These are some of the people that make using social media such a pleasure. When I have time, I intend to come back and list all the contributors below:

 

MediaSocial

 

References for Prezi “Health Professionalism and Digital Citizenship” prezi.com/at84cig99fij/health-professionalism-and-digital-citizenship/

Australian College of Nursing (n.d.) Social media guidelines for nurses. Retreived from http://www.rcna.org.au/WCM/…for_nurses.pdf

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. (2014, March 17). Social media policy. Retrieved from http://www.ahpra.gov.au/News/2014-02-13-revised-guidelines-code-and-policy.aspx

Casella, E., Mills, J., & Usher, K. (2014). Social media and nursing practice: Changing the balance between the social and technical aspects of work. Collegian, 21(2), 121–126. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2014.03.005

Citizen Kane DVD cover. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.currentfilm.com/dvdreviews4/citizenkanedvd.html

Facebook. (2015). Facebook logo. Retrieved from https://www.facebookbrand.com/
Ferguson, C., Inglis, S. C., Newton, P. J., Cripps, P. J. S., Macdonald, P. S., & Davidson, P. M. (2014).

Social media: A tool to spread information: A case study analysis of Twitter conversation at the Cardiac Society of Australia & New Zealand 61st Annual Scientific Meeting 2013. Collegian, 21(2), 89–93. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2014.03.002

Instagram. (2015). Instagram logo. Retrieved from https://help.instagram.com/304689166306603

Li, C. (2015). Charlene Li photo. Retrieved from http://www.charleneli.com/about-charlene/reviewer-resources/

lifeinthefastlane. (2013). #FOAMed logo. Retrieved from http://lifeinthefastlane.com/foam/

McNamara, P., & Meijome, X. M. (2015). Twitter Para Enfermeras (Spanish/Español). Retrieved 11 March 2015, from http://www.ausmed.com.au/es/twitter-para-enfermeras/

McNamara, P. (2014). A Nurse’s Guide to Twitter. Retrieved from http://www.ausmed.com.au/twitter-for-nurses/

McNamara, P. (2014, May 3) Luddites I have known. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/luddites

McNamara, P. (2013) Behave online as you would in real life (letter to the editor), TQN: The Queensland Nurse, June 2013, Volume 32, Number 3, Page 4.

McNamara, P. (2013, October 25) Professional use of Twitter and healthcare social media. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/NPD100

McNamara, P. (2013, October 23) A Twitter workshop in tweets. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/tweets

McNamara, P. (2013, October 1) Professional use of Twitter. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/poster

McNamara, P. (2013, July 21) Follow Friday and other twitterisms. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/FF

McNamara, P. (2013, June 7) Omnipresent and always available: A mental health nurse on Twitter. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/twit

McNamara, P. (2013, January 20) Social media for nurses: my ten-step, slightly ranty, version. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/rant1

Moorley, C., & Chinn, T. (2014). Using social media for continuous professional development. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 71(4), 713–717. doi:10.1111/jan.12504

New South Wales Nurses and Midwives Association [nswnma]. (2014, July 30). Women now have unmediated access to public conversation via social media for 1st time in history @JaneCaro #NSWNMAconf14 #destroythejoint [Tweet]. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/nswnma/status/494313737575096321

New South Wales nurses and Midwives’ Association. (2014). NSW Nurses & Midwives Association logo. Retrieved from http://housingstressed.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/NSWNMA.png

Nickson, C. P., & Cadogan, M. D. (2014). Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) for the emergency physician. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26(1), 76–83. doi:10.1111/1742-6723.12191

Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (2010, September 9) Information sheet on social media. Retrieved from http://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD10%2F3224&dbid=AP&chksum=qhog9%2FUCgKdssFmA0XnBlA%3D%3D

Twitter. (2015). Twitter logo. Retrieved from https://about.twitter.com/press/brand-assets

Wall Media. (2015). Jane Caro photo. Retrieved from http://wallmedia.com.au/jane-caro/

Wilson, R., Ranse, J., Cashin, A., & McNamara, P. (2014). Nurses and Twitter: The good, the bad, and the reluctant. Collegian, 21(2), 111–119. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2013.09.003

WordPress. (2015). WordPress logo. Retrieved from https://wordpress.org/about/logos/

Wozniak, H., Uys, P., & Mahoney, M. J. (2012). Digital communication in a networked world. In J.

Higgs, R. Ajjawi, L. McAllister, F. Trede, & S. Loftus (Eds.), Communication in the health sciences (3rd ed., pp. 150–162). South Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

YouTube. (2015). YouTube logo. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/yt/brand/downloads.html

End 

That’s it. As always your comments are welcome.

Paul McNamara, 14th March 2015

 

A Nurse’s Guide to Twitter

Today Ausmed Nursing Education launched the web page “A Nurse’s Guide to Twitter”. I was very pleased when Will Egan from Ausmed asked me submit the content. Now that I’ve seen how great it looks online I’m very very pleased.

The web page looks really cool.

Check it out for yourself via www.ausmed.com.au/twitter-for-nurses or the short URL aus.md/tfn

I’m writing this blog post purely to link to Ausmed page. Yes, that’s right: this web page is about another web page. There’s that meta part of meta4RN again. :-)

While I’m at it, I want to make an acknowledgement. The process of writing for Ausmed was great. Not only did they pay for the article to be written (a first for me), but they asked for my approval to all the edits that were made (another first for me – I’ve never had that courtesy extended by other publications). To top it off, the Ausmed team made my humble text look great! Aesthetics = accessibility. A big thanks to Will Egan specifically, and the Ausmed team generally.

Ausmed_Education-Logo

That’s it. Please go have a look at aus.md/tfn now!

Paul McNamara, 21st November 2014

Short URL: meta4RN.com/ausmed

 

Stay connected, stay strong… before and after baby

Copy of Stay connected, stay strong… before and after baby DVD on YouTube (33 minutes):

From the back cover of the DVD:

StayConnectedPregnancy, birth and parenting can be a very positive time, but sometimes it may not be how you expected it to be. Adjusting to life as a mother can be hard and make women feel down and distressed. In Australia, one in every six women experience depression during this time.

This DVD has been created to support Indigenous women, men and families understand the importance of good social and emotional wellbeing during pregnancy and beyond.

Going to get help might feel like the hardest part, but it is the best thing you can do for yourself, your baby and your family. Getting help early gives the best chance of a strong and healthy future.

YouTube URL: http://youtu.be/CLsjgw8pvOA

.

Why is the Video Online?

The video is online so that it can easily reach the target audiences: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders families, and those who support them. It is a great little video: not only does it have a very clear message that there’s no shame in asking for a bit of support, but it also looks and sounds great. My favourite thing is how the narration by Jasmin Cockatoo-Collins ties the whole thing together: even though a couple of dozen people appear on camera, Jasmin’s voice weaves the whole thing together so it kind of seems like one story. Well done to Jasmin and film-maker Jan Cattoni (Jan’s a nurse who became a film-maker).

Knowing that the video is so good that it should be shared is one thing, getting it shared is another.

Stay connected, stay strong… is available for free in Queensland and for $20 elsewhere, all you need is this PDF order form from the Queensland Centre for Perinatal and Infant Mental Health: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/qcpimh/docs/resource-order-form.pdf

youtube---the-2nd-largest-search-engine-infographicFar North Queensland residents can borrow the DVD from Cairns Libraries: link.

Queensland Health staff can access the DVD through the Queensland Health Libraries Catalogue: link

However, as accessible as all that sounds, the truth of the matter is that YouTube is the world’s largest video-sharing portal and the world’s second largest search engine. A video is not really accessible until it is online.

Now we can share the video using this link: http://youtu.be/CLsjgw8pvOA

Eek!

This is by far the riskiest thing I’ve done with my professional social media portfolio. I am not the copyright holder of this excellent short film: the Queensland Government is. Although I won’t make any money out of hosting the video, I might be subject to legal action. If there is a credible threat of legal action I will take the video down immediately. Another risk is that I might be inadvertently causing offence or distress to some person or organisation. This may mean that I will not be considered for future work in perinatal and infant mental health (perhaps funding for services will return to pre-July 2013 levels one day).

So, why take these risks?.

My agenda is simple: to demonstrate that social media can be leveraged as another channel for health promoting information. It’s something I started when working in perinatal and infant mental health in October 2011, as evidenced by this from my now-mothballed Twitter handle @PiMHnurse (now I use a less job-specific name: @meta4RN).

PIMHnurse

 

My big hope is that hosting Stay connected, stay strong… before and after baby won’t get me in too much trouble, but will serve as a spur for a more legitimate stakeholder to host the video on their YouTube or Vimeo site.

When that happens I will complete this post-script to the blog post:

Important Update DD/MM/YYYY:

Stay connected, stay strong… before and after baby is now hosted by [organisation name] at this web address: [web address]. The link and embedded video you see above are now from that site, and I have deleted the copy I posted on 7th June 2014 here: https://www.youtube.com/meta4RN

My intention in knowingly posting a video that I am not the copyright-holder of was to act as an agent of change. If I have caused harm or distress to any person or organisation I am genuinely sorry. That was not my intention.

End

That’s it. I’m feeling scared now.

Paul McNamara, 8th June 2014

Luddites I Have Known

In the never-ending quest to enthuse midwives and nurses about professional use of social media I’ve talked to people about it, given inservice education sessions, demonstrated is use as an adjunct to education, facilitated workshops, submitted conference posters, contributed to journal articles and have been invited to speak at conferences. To spread the word I’ve taken the risk of being called geek wanker narcissist, and even had cards printed:

BusinessCard4

When I talk to people about health care social media, I always mention how it lets information be shared quickly and easily,  and network with people from a range of professions/walks-of-life from all around the world. However, the thing I value the most and try to emphasise the most, is the participative, interactive nature of social media. Social media is where the debates are held; those of us who want to influence and participate in decisions gather and test our ideas on social media. Twitter is especially good for this: it lets anyone join in and contribute to- and be enlightened by- the contest of ideas.

To see how Twitter works to share information and the contest of ideas, see these two recent examples (click on the pics to see the complete conversations unfurl):

In health and education roles I encounter many people who give dumb blanket statements like, “I will never use Twitter – I don’t care what Justin Bieber had for breakfast”. Much to my embarrassment, this is the sort of thing I hear nurses (especially those in positions of influence and power) say all the time. These people are so stubborn that they won’t even look, listen or learn about professional use of social media.

A few months ago two Australian nurse lecturers forthrightly and very confidently told me that Twitter and facts are (somehow) mutually exclusive, and they do not and never will use it. I tried being zen about the whole thing (water flows around resistance, rocks in the stream shift or erode), and celebrated some of the nurse academics who are more enlightned about health care social media (see storify.com/meta4RN/lecturers).

However, the same thing keeps happening: people in positions of power and influence in the health care and higher education systems are still using silly, uninformed, blanket statements to decry the use of social media and warn people off from using it.

No more Mr Nice Guy – I’m calling these people what they are: Luddites.

People being resistive to new technologies and innovations is not new, and in my lifetime I have seen that change is inevitable – the luddites and laggards will catch-up eventually.

In the 1970s I knew people who refused to play video-games like Space Invaders – “No it’s too confusing, I’m sticking with the pinball machine” said my friend when we went into the pinball parlour.

In the 1980s I knew people who refused to use ATMs (automatic teller machines) – “No, you can’t trust a little card and machine. I’ll wait until the bank opens on Monday.” said my relative.

In the 1990s I knew people who refused to use computers. Every now and then I still hear people say, “I don’t believe in computers” as if computers are akin to the tooth fairy or religion.

In the 2000s I knew people who refused to use a mobile phone, “Why would I ever need one?”, people would say. Now, in Australia, there are more mobile phones than people (for more info: meta4RN.com/mobile).

In the 2010s I know people who refuse to use social media. As evidenced by the “I don’t need to know what Justin Bieber had for breakfast” type of statements, the reason they don’t use it is twofold: [1] they do not understand it, and [2] they decline the opportunities to learn.

I guess I should be patient with my resistive colleagues – history shows that they’ll come around eventually. However, for those nurses and midwives in positions of power and influence, I’m hoping people will print and fax you a copy of this picture below. If  you can’t summon the willingness to learn about professional health care social media, please summon the dignity and sense to stop critiquing something you do not understand.

luddites

PDF version (suitable to print and fax to a social media denier of your choosing): Luddites

As always, your comments/feedback is welcome.

Paul McNamara, 3rd May 2014

 

 

 

Yay AHPRA!

The "Before" picture: 11th March 2014

The “Before” picture: 11th March 2014

Once upon a time I worked in a pilot program as a School-Based Youth Health Nurse. This role put me in close contact with teachers. By listening to their conversations about managing classroom behaviour I was introduced to a strategy that teachers use: “Catch them being good“.

In short, the teachers said it was very easy to get caught-up in noticing and reprimanding students about unwanted behaviours – so easy that it could completely monopolise lesson time some days. A smarter strategy was to hone-in on, recognise and celebrate students who were behaving well. Don’t try to catch students being naughty – try to catch them being good.

Over the last two weeks Australian Health Professionals have caught AHPRA, the agency that regulates us all, being good.

joiningOn Monday 19th March 2014 AHPRA joined the conversation on Twitter. After years of watching the AHPRA Twitter handle sit as stony-faced and as silent as an Easter Island statue, it suddenly sprang to life.

A few days later AHPRA announced that there would be changes to the advertising guidelines to be clearer about the use of testimonials, This change was in response to many concerns being raised by health practitioners that the initial set of guidelines had unrealistic, unworkable expectations regarding the use of social media.

Then, on Friday 28th March 2014, there was a Twitter chat with AHPRA CEO Martin Fletcher using the hashtag #AHPRAqanda. Health professionals were able to seek clarity around expectations of the advertising and social media guidelines, and engage directly with AHPRA and each other about specific concerns.

The "After" picture: 30th March 2014

The “After” picture: 30th March 2014

AHPRA are only two weeks into their engagement on Twitter and have been pretty clear that they intend to walk before they try to run.

I am very pleased that AHPRA are on Twitter because it will help me address some of the fear (bordering on paranoia) that is expressed every time I facilitate an inservice on professional use of social media. Health professionals often express that they are reluctant to use social media in a professional sense because they fear that either their employer or AHPRA will see it as a bad thing. Now I will be able to confidently counter that concern by reinforcing my previous argument that health professionals should be unafraid to speak up and join in the conversation on social media.

Now that AHPRA has joined the conversation, maybe there is something of a bridge across “the big scary chasm” between the early adopters and the majority of Australian healthcare professionals using social media.

Let’s hope so.

adopters

As always, comments are welcome.

Paul McNamara, 30th March 2014

Professional use of Twitter and Healthcare Social Media #NPD100

SmartCare-Poster

About the Conference

Peter Carr is an innovative Nurse Lecturer who coordinates the subject NPD100 Health Communications, Research and Informatics for undergraduate nurses at The University of Notre Dame Australia.

Peter, with support from his colleagues and students, has organised the SMART CARE Conference (SMART = Social Media Application for Research and Teaching) hosted by the University of Notre Dame, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Fremantle campus on Friday 25th of October, 2013. More about the conference here: #NPD100 The Conference

The tagline on the poster “#NPD100 The Conference” refers to the neat trick of using the subject code as the hashtag. Such a good idea. Some universities and workplaces still have a stop it or you’ll go blind! kind of attitude towards social media, so it’s very refreshing to see a university subject that so strongly encourages students to utilise social media professionally, to be digital citizens.

It is a terrific honour to be asked to contribute at this conference – I’m very grateful to Peter for asking me along. Together with Kane Guthrie and Marie Ennis O’Connor, we will have time to explore some of the uses of health care social media. To assist the flow of ideas to continue beyond one Friday in Freo, a copy of my #NPD100 SMART CARE Conference presentation is included below.

Professional use of Twitter and Healthcare Social Media

Two Notes in Closing

  1. Regular visitors to meta4RN will recognise the presentation above as having a lot in common with this recent post: meta4RN.com/poster. Yes folks: self-plagarism is alive and well. However, in my defence, the #NPD100 presentation will be able to explore some of these ideas in a lot more detail than the poster version.
  2. Ironically, I’m about to go pretty quiet on social media for a couple of weeks. After spending all week in Perth and Fremantle talking about and using social media, I’m going on holiday in country Western Australia with my lovely partner. On one of the slides above I present balance as being one of the risks of using social media. To manage that risk, there are times when ignoring social media and simply enjoying time with the people you love is the sensible, balanced thing to do. Digital citizens need to be analogue citizens too. :-)

See you in a couple of weeks!

Paul McNamara, 25th October 2013

A Twitter Workshop in Tweets

Monday at the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses (ACMHN) 39th International Mental Health Nursing Conference, we conducted a workshop on Engaging with Social Media. There were three workshop facilitators: Clare Butterfield from Canberra, Communications & Publications Officer (see @ACMHN on Twitter), Paul McNamara (me), Clinical Nurse Consultant from Cairns (see @meta4RN on Twitter) and, our special guest co-facilitator Emily Mignacca (see @emilymignacca on Twitter) graduating student nurse who commences as a RN specialising in mental health early in 2014.

Rather than use a PowerPoint or other traditional presentation method, I wrote the core content of the workshop as a series of Tweets. In real time as the hands-on part of the workshop was in action, we sent the Tweets out from the @ACMHN Twitter account. The Twitter feed on this page twubs.com/ACMHN2013 was projected onto a screen so workshop participants could see the @ACMHN tweets, their own tweets using the conference hashtag and, perhaps most importantly, the comments and interaction from other Twitter users who used #ACMHN2013. It was a successful strategy – I’ll certainly use it again for future workshops on using Twitter.

You are welcome to use all or part of A Twitter Workshop in Tweets below provided you abide by the Creative Commons Licence below. This licence lets others distribute, remix and build upon the work, but only if it is for non-commercial purposes, they credit the original creator and source – Paul McNamara (2013) A Twitter Workshop in Tweets http://meta4RN/tweets – and they license their derivative works under the same terms. You are also welcome to contact me to facilitate/co-facilitate your health care social media workshop.  My email is meta4RN [at symbol] gmail.com

1. Pre-workshop info/publicity

Engaging with Social Media – Clare Butterfield and Paul McNamara Monday 21st October 2013 12:30-2:30pm

Social media allows Collaboration and Partnerships in Mental Health Nursing to transcend time and place: time through collaborative, asynchronous communication; place by being connected to the world’s online clinical communities. This hands-on workshop aims to act as a launching-pad for those who want to turbo-charge the conference theme.

The workshop will be in two parts: The first, briefest part, will introduce four examples of professional use of social media, using Twitter as the primary example. This part of the workshop intends to show participants the value of engaging with social media.

The emphasis will be the second part of the workshop. This will be a hands-on session that will assist participants gain confidence in using Twitter. This part of the workshop intends to equip participants with skills in engaging with social media in a professional capacity. Wifi will be available. Participants are asked to bring:

  • a mobile internet device (eg: smartphone, tablet or laptop computer);
  • knowledge (ie: the relevant passwords) on how to download apps onto your mobile device;
  • for those who already have an established Twitter account, the knowledge (ie: the relevant passwords) on how to access it;
  • a spirit of curiosity and fun!

To reinforce the learning acquired in the workshop, follow-up “skill checks” will be scheduled during conference breaks on Tuesday and Wednesday. Please come along – the workshop facilitators expect it to be a dynamic, fun, enlightening masterclass in engaging with social media.

Emily Mignacca was invited to join in co-facilitating the workshop just a couple of weeks before the workshop. Although Emily missed-out on being named in the pre-conference publicity, her participation on the day was vital. Emily worked hard and did a good job supporting people who were more than twice her age pick-up some of the skills and enthusiasm she has in using social media professionally. You could do worse than follow @emilymignacca on Twitter.

twitter

Below is a list of my pre-composed, pre-ordered tweets for the workshop. There were minor adjustments, inclusions and exclusion made as we went along, but mostly we just sent them out verbatim.

2. #ACMHN2013 Twitter Workshop in Tweets

Creative Commons License
A Twitter Workshop in Tweets by Paul McNamara is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://meta4RN/tweets.

Before

Please RT to show Twitter’s potential/reach to participants in today’s #ACMHN2013 Engaging with Social Media Workshop

Starting soon: #ACMHN2013 Engaging with Social Media Workshop. Info: http://acmhnconferences.acmhn.org/speakers/ (near bottom: scroll down) #HCSMANZ

No PowerPoint slides at the Engaging with Social Media Workshop. We’re Tweeting the content using this hashtag #ACMHN2013

Warning: HEAPS of #ACMHN2013 Social Media Workshop tweets next 2 hours
To join: http://twubs.com/ACMHN2013
To mute: http://roniweiss.com/2011/05/03/muting-hashtags/

Start

#ACMHN2013 Facilitator 1 of 3: Clare Butterfield @ACMHN Communications and Publications Officer with – Face of ACMHN’s Twitter

#ACMHN2013 Facilitator 2 of 3: Emily Mignacca @emilymignacca GenY/Millennial, Almost-Mental Health Nurse – Future of @ACMHN

#ACMHN2013 Facilitator 3 of 3: Paul McNamara @meta4RN clinical nurse consultant + educator – Fellow of @ACMHN

First-up, a hard-sell on some professional uses of Twitter. For those playing-along at home see http://meta4RN.com/poster #ACMHN2013

What is Twitter’s potential/reach? Here’s a demonstration we prepared earlier https://twitter.com/meta4rn/status/392021423943716866 #ACMHN2013

Here are the results: http://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/acmhn2013/analytics/?hashtag=acmhn2013&fdate=10%2F17%2F2013&shour=9&smin=0&tdate=10%2F21%2F2013&thour=9&tmin=0&ssec=00&tsec=00&img=1 #ACMHN2013

Enough chin-wagging. Let’s start doing! Go to https://twitter.com/signup to start an account #ACMHN2013

Make a choice now: is this an official, personal or professional twitter account? Mental health nurses know about boundaries, right? #ACMHN2013

Need clarification on official, personal + professional? This Qld Gov site is clear + succinct: http://www.qld.gov.au/web/social-media/policy-guidelines/guidelines/official-use.html#ACMHN2013

On your professional twitter account you’re not representing an organisation, but are primarily talking about work-related stuff #ACMHN2013

Choose a short name (aka “handle”) eg: instead of @BartholomewBonython maybe @BartB #ACMHN2013

Bad news for people without exotic names: @JohnSmith @JSmith + @SmithJ are all taken ;-/ #ACMHN2013

Short names and concise tweets are good. Twitter = Brevity Central #ACMHN2013

Struggling deciding on a name? Get creative! Example: a nerdy mental health nurse might be @MHnerse #ACMHN2013

Or… a graduating student nurse might be @SN2RN #ACMHN2013

Don’t use your workplace name/initials unless you’re 100% sure you’re representing your employer rather than your professional self #ACMHN2013

That’s why I’m @meta4RN rather than @QueenslandHealthRN – there’s a BIG difference in implications/expectations #ACMHN2013

Think about how you’ll describe yourself in your Twitter bio. Do you need to name your employer? It might be easier if you don’t. #ACMHN2013

Twitter bios accommodate a bit of personality along with a description of you/your interests #ACMHN2013

Re bio: maybe better not to say “lost virginity to a rockstar”, but “enthusiastically supporting musicians” would be OK :-) #ACMHN2013

Professional doesn’t have to be boring #ACMHN2013

Still nervous re the name/bio thing? You’ll get away with being anonymous, but why? On the run? Witness protection program? #ACMHN2013

And a pic. You’ll need a pic. Eggs repel followers. #truefact #ACMHN2013

Your pic doesn’t have to be a photo. There are avatars available online PRN. eg: http://www.twittergallery.com/?p=1985 #ACMHN2013

DON’T BE AN EGG! #ACMHN2013

Right. When you’re ready, announce your arrival to the Twitterverse. No pressure: channel Neil Armstrong. #ACMHN2013

Oh, and use the conference hashtag so we can see your tweet on the #ACMHN2013 screen

Next up you’ll want to start following some people, otherwise your Twitter feed will be bare, and you will get sad, lonely and bored :-( #ACMHN2013

Who to follow? We can start with each other – a learn as we go thing #ACMHN2013

Twitter is not like Facebook. It is perfectly acceptable, not at all stalker-ish, to follow a complete stranger. #ACMHN2013

#ACMHN2013 Also, if you want to see who else is active in health care social media in Aus/NZ sus-out this hashtag: #HCSMANZ

#ACMHN2013 @nurse_w_glasses is a rockstar amongst social-media-mental-health-nurses: well worth following.

While we’re looking at who to follow, sus out the #WeNurses + #OzNurses hashtags – anyone/anything of interest? #ACMHN2013

If so, you may want to follow that person and/or retweet (ie: share) their tweet. #ACMHN2013

RT = ReTweet
MT = Modified Tweet
HT = HatTip/HeardThrough
More about Twitterisms here http://meta4RN.com/FF #ACMHN2013

Now, about hashtags… don’t be intimidated. You can use Twitter happily with never using one in your whole life #ACMHN2013 BUT…

Hashtags pull disparate conversations and people together. Like at this mental health nursing conference, for instance #ACMHN2013

Eg: even if you had the most incisive political tweet ever created, QandA viewers wouldn’t know about it without the #QandA hashtag #ACMHN2013

The hashtag thing can be fiddly at first. For the #ACMHN2013 conference this site makes it REALLY easy: http://twubs.com/ACMHN2013

Create your own hashtags, BUT learn from the Susan Boyle album launch hashtag: #susanalbumparty can be read 2 ways :-) #ACMHN2013

So, what to Tweet about? Anything that you think is relevant to people who may share all or some of your interests #ACMHN2013

Remember: the conventions of professional communication are long-established: letters, email etc. Why change it on Twitter? #ACMHN2013

Now, let’s pause and have a look at the @acn_tweet / RCNA (2011) Social Media Guidelines for Nurses http://www.rcna.org.au/WCM/Images/RCNA_website/Files%20for%20upload%20and%20link/rcna_social_media_guidelines_for_nurses.pdf #ACMHN2013

While we’re at it, let’s have a look at the @NurMidBoardAust guidelines too http://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD10%2F3224&dbid=AP&chksum=qhog9%2FUCgKdssFmA0XnBlA%3D%3D #ACMHN2013

Any surprises or comments about the social media guidelines? #ACMHN2013

#ACMHN2013 The guidelines are pretty common-sense stuff. Maybe this flowchart is all we need

SoMeFlowchart

On a mobile device? Install an app, eg: Twitter https://about.twitter.com/download #ACMHN2013

On a mobile device? Install an app, eg: HootSuite https://hootsuite.com/features/mobile-apps #ACMHN2013

On a mobile device? Install an app, eg: Tapbot http://tapbots.com/software/tweetbot/ #ACMHN2013

Probably the easiest way to learn Twitter is to follow people who have already learned Twitter. Stick with it – it’ll click in. #ACMHN2013

Do unto others. #TwitterTips #ACMHN2013

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Be careful mixing personal and professional. Boundaries are important.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 You already know about confidentiality; if you’re doing confidentiality wrong online it will definitely get spotted.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Naturally, you would NEVER give individual or detailed clinical advice on Twitter.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Generalised info is fine, eg: Getting great feedback from consumers about the @mindhealthc site http://www.mindhealthconnect.org.au

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Try not to act like a dickhead. Also, don’t use words like “dickhead” – it’s unprofessional. #TwitterTips #ACMHN2013

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Apologise if you do/say something stupid. BTW sorry for saying “dickhead” before.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Twitter spam is especially good at playing on the insecurities of newbies, so be vigilant + don’t click dodgy links.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Spam example 1:
This person is saying horrible things about you www.dodgylink.com DON’T CLICK!

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Spam example 2:
This photo of you! LOL www.dodgylink.com DON’T CLICK!

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Mostly you won’t Tweet from/about your workplace… you’ll have your work to do.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 There may be an occasional exception to the workplace rule, eg: Gammin Hospital Christmas decorations are fabulous!

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Would your patients or boss be offended by that photo? Yes = Delete. No = Tweet.

Finish

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 RT @charleneli: Twitter is not a technology. It’s a conversation. And it’s happening with or without you.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 No need to worry about forgetting today’s workshop, it’s all here: http://meta4RN/tweets

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Connect. Be generous. Have fun.

Creative Commons License
A Twitter Workshop in Tweets by Paul McNamara is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://meta4RN/tweets.

As always, your comments and feedback is welcome. Please use the comment facility below.

Paul McNamara, 23rd October 2013