Tag Archives: workshop

Perinatal Mental Health Workshop Links and Resources

Previously for Perinatal Mental Health Workshops I have trickled-out the links and resources we refer to during the workshop via Twitter and Facebook.  It’s a nice idea, and has worked pretty well (for more information about this experiment in social media enhanced education please see the video below and/or this link: meta4RN.com/workshop).

However, it is pretty labour-intensive to pre-schedule each individual Tweet and Facebook post every time I facilitate a Perinatal Mental Health Workshop, so to save some mucking-around I’ll list the links and resources here.

The headings in red are not mutually exclusive – some links cross boundaries. The list/links will be updated PRN:

Guiding Clinical Practice

guidelines

2014 Cairns Perinatal Mental Health Workshops (follow the link for info about the workshops and for free registration) pmh.eventbrite.com.au

Australia’s Perinatal Mental Health Clinical Practice Guidelines www.beyondblue.org.au

Promoting Perinatal Mental Health Wellness in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities (PDF from the book Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health and Wellbeing Principles and Practice; chapter 16 by Sue Ferguson-Hill) aboriginal.childhealthresearch.org.au/media/54907/chapter16.pdf

Perinatal Jargon Busting (get your head around the lingo) meta4RN.com/jargon

Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (tips for midwives, child health nurses, Indigenous health workers and other clinicians) meta4RN.com/epd

Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale  (this version is online, anonymous, free and self-scoring) justspeakup.com.au/epds

Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Libguide (a very handy for researchers and clinicians) tpch.qld.libguides.com/PIMH

pnd-dadQueensland Centre for Perinatal and Infant Mental Health (QCPIMH have some great resources) www.health.qld.gov.au/qcpimh

Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Nurse eNetwork (an email network hosted by the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses for nurses and midwives interested in perinatal and/or infant mental health) lists.acmhn.org/wws/info/perinatal-infant-mh

ACMHN Perinatal Mental Health Online CPD Program (a 3 module continuing professional development program which is open to Australian College of Mental Health Nurses members [free] and non-member nurses and midwives [$33 including GST]) www.acmhn.org/perinatal-elearning

Nurturing the Nurturers (info about guided reflective practice/clinical supervision as a self-care mechanism for health professionals) meta4RN.com/nurturers

For the Parent(s)

PANDA

Cairns Perinatal Mental Health Support Options google.com/?q=perinatal+cairns

Stay Connected, Stay Strong: Before and After Baby (cool DVD featuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents). Borrow: lib.cairnslibrary.com.au Buy: www.health.qld.gov.au/qcpimh YouTube: http://youtu.be/CLsjgw8pvOA

Behind the Mask: The Hidden Struggle of Parenthood (DVD preview) http://youtu.be/FjqOqJLkyFs

PANDA – Post and Antenatal Depression Association (for info and phone support) www.panda.org.au

How is Dad Going? (for fathers affected by perinatal anxiety/depression)  www.howisdadgoing.org.au

Pregnancy, Birth & Baby (24 hour info and support) www.pregnancybirthbaby.org.au

beyondblue (lots of resources, including booklets regarding emotional health in pregnancy and early parenthood, some multilingual booklets) www.beyondblue.org.au

mindthebumpMind the Bump is a free Mindfulness Meditation App to help individuals and couples support their mental and emotional wellbeing in preparation for having a baby and becoming a new parent www.mindthebump.org.au

Black Dog Institute (info and resources re perinatal depression for women and men; presented in a different style to beyond blue’s info) www.blackdoginstitute.org.au

Doc Ready (for those not sure how to start a conversation about mental health with your midwife, nurse or doctor? maybe building a checklist will help) docready.org

MindHealthConnect (good place to find trusted mental health programs, fact sheets, and to access urgent support via the red “Need Help Now?” button on each page) www.mindhealthconnect.org.au

pnd-mum-torres

Puerperal Psychosis

Information on Puerperal Psychosis (2010) by Dr Anne Sven Williams and Sue Ellershaw (be alert, not alarmed: a self-downloading DOC; the target audience for this is women/families affected by puerperal psychosis,  but many of us clinicians have also found it a useful adjunct to our formal education) www.wch.sa.gov.au

Puerperal Psychosis: A Carer’s Survival Guide (PDF by Craig Allatt: Craig’s partner experienced puerperal psychosis) www.wch.sa.gov.au

Keeping Baby In Mind

Print

A Monster Ate My Mum (a children’s book looking at postnatal depression through a child’s eyes) amonsteratemymum.wordpress.com

Still Face Experiment (Edward Tronick’s demonstration of how infants respond to changes in interaction from primary caregivers is often cited in infant mental health education) youtu.be/apzXGEbZht0

Baby Cues Video Guide (trying to work-out what newborns are trying to communicate can be tricky; these video guides might help) raisingchildren.net.au

Circle of Security (re attachment theory and affective neuroscience) circleofsecurity.net

Raising Children Network (an Australian resource for parenting, covers newborns to teens) raisingchildren.net.au

wellbeing

That’s all I have on my list for now. Please add your suggestions for valuable links and resources to share at my Perinatal mental Health Workshops in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 7th February 2014

A Twitter Workshop in Tweets

Monday at the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses (ACMHN) 39th International Mental Health Nursing Conference, we conducted a workshop on Engaging with Social Media. There were three workshop facilitators: Clare Butterfield from Canberra, Communications & Publications Officer (see @ACMHN on Twitter), Paul McNamara (me), Clinical Nurse Consultant from Cairns (see @meta4RN on Twitter) and, our special guest co-facilitator Emily Mignacca (see @emilymignacca on Twitter) graduating student nurse who commences as a RN specialising in mental health early in 2014.

Rather than use a PowerPoint or other traditional presentation method, I wrote the core content of the workshop as a series of Tweets. In real time as the hands-on part of the workshop was in action, we sent the Tweets out from the @ACMHN Twitter account. The Twitter feed on this page twubs.com/ACMHN2013 was projected onto a screen so workshop participants could see the @ACMHN tweets, their own tweets using the conference hashtag and, perhaps most importantly, the comments and interaction from other Twitter users who used #ACMHN2013. It was a successful strategy – I’ll certainly use it again for future workshops on using Twitter.

You are welcome to use all or part of A Twitter Workshop in Tweets below provided you abide by the Creative Commons Licence below. This licence lets others distribute, remix and build upon the work, but only if it is for non-commercial purposes, they credit the original creator and source – Paul McNamara (2013) A Twitter Workshop in Tweets http://meta4RN/tweets – and they license their derivative works under the same terms. You are also welcome to contact me to facilitate/co-facilitate your health care social media workshop.  My email is meta4RN [at symbol] gmail.com

1. Pre-workshop info/publicity

Engaging with Social Media – Clare Butterfield and Paul McNamara Monday 21st October 2013 12:30-2:30pm

Social media allows Collaboration and Partnerships in Mental Health Nursing to transcend time and place: time through collaborative, asynchronous communication; place by being connected to the world’s online clinical communities. This hands-on workshop aims to act as a launching-pad for those who want to turbo-charge the conference theme.

The workshop will be in two parts: The first, briefest part, will introduce four examples of professional use of social media, using Twitter as the primary example. This part of the workshop intends to show participants the value of engaging with social media.

The emphasis will be the second part of the workshop. This will be a hands-on session that will assist participants gain confidence in using Twitter. This part of the workshop intends to equip participants with skills in engaging with social media in a professional capacity. Wifi will be available. Participants are asked to bring:

  • a mobile internet device (eg: smartphone, tablet or laptop computer);
  • knowledge (ie: the relevant passwords) on how to download apps onto your mobile device;
  • for those who already have an established Twitter account, the knowledge (ie: the relevant passwords) on how to access it;
  • a spirit of curiosity and fun!

To reinforce the learning acquired in the workshop, follow-up “skill checks” will be scheduled during conference breaks on Tuesday and Wednesday. Please come along – the workshop facilitators expect it to be a dynamic, fun, enlightening masterclass in engaging with social media.

Emily Mignacca was invited to join in co-facilitating the workshop just a couple of weeks before the workshop. Although Emily missed-out on being named in the pre-conference publicity, her participation on the day was vital. Emily worked hard and did a good job supporting people who were more than twice her age pick-up some of the skills and enthusiasm she has in using social media professionally. You could do worse than follow @emilymignacca on Twitter.

twitter

Below is a list of my pre-composed, pre-ordered tweets for the workshop. There were minor adjustments, inclusions and exclusion made as we went along, but mostly we just sent them out verbatim.

2. #ACMHN2013 Twitter Workshop in Tweets

Creative Commons License
A Twitter Workshop in Tweets by Paul McNamara is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://meta4RN/tweets.

Before

Please RT to show Twitter’s potential/reach to participants in today’s #ACMHN2013 Engaging with Social Media Workshop

Starting soon: #ACMHN2013 Engaging with Social Media Workshop. Info: http://acmhnconferences.acmhn.org/speakers/ (near bottom: scroll down) #HCSMANZ

No PowerPoint slides at the Engaging with Social Media Workshop. We’re Tweeting the content using this hashtag #ACMHN2013

Warning: HEAPS of #ACMHN2013 Social Media Workshop tweets next 2 hours
To join: http://twubs.com/ACMHN2013
To mute: http://roniweiss.com/2011/05/03/muting-hashtags/

Start

#ACMHN2013 Facilitator 1 of 3: Clare Butterfield @ACMHN Communications and Publications Officer with – Face of ACMHN’s Twitter

#ACMHN2013 Facilitator 2 of 3: Emily Mignacca @emilymignacca GenY/Millennial, Almost-Mental Health Nurse – Future of @ACMHN

#ACMHN2013 Facilitator 3 of 3: Paul McNamara @meta4RN clinical nurse consultant + educator – Fellow of @ACMHN

First-up, a hard-sell on some professional uses of Twitter. For those playing-along at home see http://meta4RN.com/poster #ACMHN2013

What is Twitter’s potential/reach? Here’s a demonstration we prepared earlier https://twitter.com/meta4rn/status/392021423943716866 #ACMHN2013

Here are the results: http://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/acmhn2013/analytics/?hashtag=acmhn2013&fdate=10%2F17%2F2013&shour=9&smin=0&tdate=10%2F21%2F2013&thour=9&tmin=0&ssec=00&tsec=00&img=1 #ACMHN2013

Enough chin-wagging. Let’s start doing! Go to https://twitter.com/signup to start an account #ACMHN2013

Make a choice now: is this an official, personal or professional twitter account? Mental health nurses know about boundaries, right? #ACMHN2013

Need clarification on official, personal + professional? This Qld Gov site is clear + succinct: http://www.qld.gov.au/web/social-media/policy-guidelines/guidelines/official-use.html#ACMHN2013

On your professional twitter account you’re not representing an organisation, but are primarily talking about work-related stuff #ACMHN2013

Choose a short name (aka “handle”) eg: instead of @BartholomewBonython maybe @BartB #ACMHN2013

Bad news for people without exotic names: @JohnSmith @JSmith + @SmithJ are all taken ;-/ #ACMHN2013

Short names and concise tweets are good. Twitter = Brevity Central #ACMHN2013

Struggling deciding on a name? Get creative! Example: a nerdy mental health nurse might be @MHnerse #ACMHN2013

Or… a graduating student nurse might be @SN2RN #ACMHN2013

Don’t use your workplace name/initials unless you’re 100% sure you’re representing your employer rather than your professional self #ACMHN2013

That’s why I’m @meta4RN rather than @QueenslandHealthRN – there’s a BIG difference in implications/expectations #ACMHN2013

Think about how you’ll describe yourself in your Twitter bio. Do you need to name your employer? It might be easier if you don’t. #ACMHN2013

Twitter bios accommodate a bit of personality along with a description of you/your interests #ACMHN2013

Re bio: maybe better not to say “lost virginity to a rockstar”, but “enthusiastically supporting musicians” would be OK :-) #ACMHN2013

Professional doesn’t have to be boring #ACMHN2013

Still nervous re the name/bio thing? You’ll get away with being anonymous, but why? On the run? Witness protection program? #ACMHN2013

And a pic. You’ll need a pic. Eggs repel followers. #truefact #ACMHN2013

Your pic doesn’t have to be a photo. There are avatars available online PRN. eg: http://www.twittergallery.com/?p=1985 #ACMHN2013

DON’T BE AN EGG! #ACMHN2013

Right. When you’re ready, announce your arrival to the Twitterverse. No pressure: channel Neil Armstrong. #ACMHN2013

Oh, and use the conference hashtag so we can see your tweet on the #ACMHN2013 screen

Next up you’ll want to start following some people, otherwise your Twitter feed will be bare, and you will get sad, lonely and bored :-( #ACMHN2013

Who to follow? We can start with each other – a learn as we go thing #ACMHN2013

Twitter is not like Facebook. It is perfectly acceptable, not at all stalker-ish, to follow a complete stranger. #ACMHN2013

#ACMHN2013 Also, if you want to see who else is active in health care social media in Aus/NZ sus-out this hashtag: #HCSMANZ

#ACMHN2013 @nurse_w_glasses is a rockstar amongst social-media-mental-health-nurses: well worth following.

While we’re looking at who to follow, sus out the #WeNurses + #OzNurses hashtags – anyone/anything of interest? #ACMHN2013

If so, you may want to follow that person and/or retweet (ie: share) their tweet. #ACMHN2013

RT = ReTweet
MT = Modified Tweet
HT = HatTip/HeardThrough
More about Twitterisms here http://meta4RN.com/FF #ACMHN2013

Now, about hashtags… don’t be intimidated. You can use Twitter happily with never using one in your whole life #ACMHN2013 BUT…

Hashtags pull disparate conversations and people together. Like at this mental health nursing conference, for instance #ACMHN2013

Eg: even if you had the most incisive political tweet ever created, QandA viewers wouldn’t know about it without the #QandA hashtag #ACMHN2013

The hashtag thing can be fiddly at first. For the #ACMHN2013 conference this site makes it REALLY easy: http://twubs.com/ACMHN2013

Create your own hashtags, BUT learn from the Susan Boyle album launch hashtag: #susanalbumparty can be read 2 ways :-) #ACMHN2013

So, what to Tweet about? Anything that you think is relevant to people who may share all or some of your interests #ACMHN2013

Remember: the conventions of professional communication are long-established: letters, email etc. Why change it on Twitter? #ACMHN2013

Now, let’s pause and have a look at the @acn_tweet / RCNA (2011) Social Media Guidelines for Nurses http://www.rcna.org.au/WCM/Images/RCNA_website/Files%20for%20upload%20and%20link/rcna_social_media_guidelines_for_nurses.pdf #ACMHN2013

While we’re at it, let’s have a look at the @NurMidBoardAust guidelines too http://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD10%2F3224&dbid=AP&chksum=qhog9%2FUCgKdssFmA0XnBlA%3D%3D #ACMHN2013

Any surprises or comments about the social media guidelines? #ACMHN2013

#ACMHN2013 The guidelines are pretty common-sense stuff. Maybe this flowchart is all we need

SoMeFlowchart

On a mobile device? Install an app, eg: Twitter https://about.twitter.com/download #ACMHN2013

On a mobile device? Install an app, eg: HootSuite https://hootsuite.com/features/mobile-apps #ACMHN2013

On a mobile device? Install an app, eg: Tapbot http://tapbots.com/software/tweetbot/ #ACMHN2013

Probably the easiest way to learn Twitter is to follow people who have already learned Twitter. Stick with it – it’ll click in. #ACMHN2013

Do unto others. #TwitterTips #ACMHN2013

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Be careful mixing personal and professional. Boundaries are important.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 You already know about confidentiality; if you’re doing confidentiality wrong online it will definitely get spotted.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Naturally, you would NEVER give individual or detailed clinical advice on Twitter.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Generalised info is fine, eg: Getting great feedback from consumers about the @mindhealthc site http://www.mindhealthconnect.org.au

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Try not to act like a dickhead. Also, don’t use words like “dickhead” – it’s unprofessional. #TwitterTips #ACMHN2013

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Apologise if you do/say something stupid. BTW sorry for saying “dickhead” before.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Twitter spam is especially good at playing on the insecurities of newbies, so be vigilant + don’t click dodgy links.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Spam example 1:
This person is saying horrible things about you www.dodgylink.com DON’T CLICK!

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Spam example 2:
This photo of you! LOL www.dodgylink.com DON’T CLICK!

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Mostly you won’t Tweet from/about your workplace… you’ll have your work to do.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 There may be an occasional exception to the workplace rule, eg: Gammin Hospital Christmas decorations are fabulous!

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Would your patients or boss be offended by that photo? Yes = Delete. No = Tweet.

Finish

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 RT @charleneli: Twitter is not a technology. It’s a conversation. And it’s happening with or without you.

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 No need to worry about forgetting today’s workshop, it’s all here: http://meta4RN/tweets

#TwitterTips #ACMHN2013 Connect. Be generous. Have fun.

Creative Commons License
A Twitter Workshop in Tweets by Paul McNamara is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://meta4RN/tweets.

As always, your comments and feedback is welcome. Please use the comment facility below.

Paul McNamara, 23rd October 2013

Mental Health Nurses in the Pacific (to be specific) #alajcu2013

A Cool Event

There was 441 years of experience in health care at the Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Workshop, just one part of the month-long event supporting mental health leaders from six Pacific Island nations.

There was 441 years of experience in health care at the Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Workshop, just one part of the month-long event supporting mental health leaders from six Pacific Island nations.

A really cool event happened in Cairns from July 1st to 26th. James Cook University’s School of Nursing, Midwifery & Nutrition hosted eighteen Mental Health Nurses from Western Pacific nations; specifically, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Palau, KiribatiCook Islands and the Solomon Islands. Funded via an AusAID Australian Leadership Award, leaders in mental health nursing from these countries had the opportunity to attend lectures, participate in workshops, make site visits to public and private mental health facilities, and other activities aimed at providing educational opportunities they may not be able to acquire at home.

This “train the trainer” approach to supporting mental health nurse education amongst our neighbours in the Pacific is a really smart idea: major kudos to Professor Kim Usher and the whole team at James Cook University’s World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre and School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition. For more info about the program please visit these sites:

Also, it is interesting to read this interview with Jeffrey Alphonse, a mental health nurse from Papua New Guinea who attended the course. Jeffrey conveys a sense of life living and working in in a PNG mental health inpatient facility.

I am sure that the JCU crew have evaluations of the event that will probably pop-up in reports/journals/online soon enough. That’s the sort of thing researchers are really good at.

OK. What’s This Blog Post About Then?

For this blog post I just want to touch on two cool outcomes from my perspective: the perspective of one who was not an organiser or “insider” to the event, but not a complete outsider to the event either.

It was an honour to be invited to meet with the Mental Health Nurses from the Pacific for two occasions. The first visit was an opportunity to introduce my role and compare/contrast the way mental health nurses are deployed in Australia and in the Pacific. Something I learnt is that it is easier to have nurse-led programs in Pacific nations because, to put it bluntly, there are often no other mental health professionals available.

There was 441 years of health care  experience at the Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Workshop on 12/07/13.

There was 441 years of health care experience at the Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Workshop on 12/07/13.

The second visit was to facilitate a Perinatal and Infant Mental Health (PiMH) Workshop on 12th July. The workshop was different from the usual ones I run because of the vast amount of diverse cultural and clinical experience in the room. Obviously, the vast majority of the participants were mental health nurse leaders from the six Pacific Island nations listed above, but a couple of social workers from the FNQ Medicare Local and a JCU Student Nurse also participated, and some of the JCU Faculty were also able to pop-in for a while.

I have mentioned the structure of the workshop in a previous blog post (see here). Although this workshop had plenty of differences in participant experiences (great learning for me!), the content/agenda we covered was pretty-much the same as previous PiMH workshops, just presented in a slightly different manner.

The workshop contributed to the first of the two cool outcomes.

Cool Outcome Number One: Perinatal and Infant Mental Health in the Pacific Islands

Cool outcome number one is that the workshop content really resonated with some people attending; so much so that they’re intending to take some of the learnings from the workshop back home with them. I found out about this via Anna Cole-Groth, a JCU student nurse who supported the Pacific Island mental health nurse leaders, and contributed to extending the reach of event by utilising social media (as per these examples below):

Solomon

A few of the participants, including Rose from the Solomon Islands, were interested in the way we have been trying to build mental health screening and support pathways into the day-to-day practice of antenatal and postpartum practice. The notion of a prevention/early intervention, proactive “precovery” approach to perinatal mental health care was welcomed as a way to work in partnership with families, communities and other health professionals.

PNG

The workshop was the first introduction to infant mental health for most of the participants, and had particular resonance with some in attendance. The workshop allowed us to discuss and consider some of the key concepts around infant mental health practice, and to give consideration to how it could be incorporated into healthcare in the Pacific Islands. Many participants, including those from Papua New Guinea, spoke of how it could enhance the way mental health and baby care is catered for in community-orientated village life.

It is fantastic to know that some of the perinatal and infant mental information and models of care we have been using here in Australia might have a positive, knock-on effect with our two closest neighbours: Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. For me personally and professionally, after feeling quite dejected about the loss of a role funded by the National Perinatal Depression Initiative (NPDI), it is an unexpected and very welcome joy to think there may be an echo of the program I facilitated amongst our northern neighbours, via a grassroots, nurse-led, undertaking to trial some of these ideas.

We (those of us who have had access to education and resources in this area) should do everything we can to support these mental health nurse leaders. I hope that the Pacific Islanders will find the email network hosted by the ACMHN (Australian College of Mental Health Nurses) a useful bridge to information, resources and supportive, encouraging peers. Subscription to the Perinatal & Infant Mental Health Nurse eNetwork is free and simple; more info and instructions here and here.

Cool Outcome Number Two: Social Media and Wantoks

“Wantok” is pidgin for “one talk” (say it quick: it’s phonetic), ie: a shared language. In places like Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands the use of the word wantok is in context of a nuanced social system that I (a whitefella from Adelaide living in Cairns), may ever fully understand. So, for my benefit, let’s simplify the use of “wontok” to simply “those who share a common language”, as in “those who understand and like each other”.

Mental health nurses, no matter what nation they live and work in, share the common experience of up-close and personal interactions with people experiencing mental illness. Most of us also share the goal/hope that we will find effective ways to promote good mental health, so as to lighten the load for individuals, their families and the community they live and work in. This gives us a shared language: we’re wantoks.

Evan Casella, another JCU student nurse who supported the program participants and used social media to share some of the program content, sent out this great photo with the tweet:

#alajcu2013 participant opinions of SoMe use in nursing. Great to get a South Pacific perspective. Mostly thumbs up!

like

It’s such a good photo – I love the way Evan used the Facebook “like” symbol, and that the participants were straight down the line with whether they thought social media (aka SoMe) would be useful in their context. This, in turn, led to the next cool outcome: three of the program participants joined Twitter before the course ended.

So, although the four-week Pacific Island Mental Health Nurse Leaders program is over, it is easy to stay connected with some of program participants using social media.

If you are a mental health nurse who can share information, resources, ideas and camaraderie, please follow these mental health nurses from PNG: they are your Wantoks.

For those interested in professional use of social media, have a look at the transcript and analytics of the #alajcu2013 hashtag courtesy of www.symplur.com

Analytics via Symplur health hashtag project

Analytics via Symplur health hashtag project

Closing Remarks

Mental health health nurses speak one language; we are wantoks. How do we know? By the connections. As shown above we connected content (perinatal and infant mental health is one example) and we connected clinicians (in person for four weeks, and looking ahead via Twitter).

Congratulations to James Cook University and AusAID for the work that they have done.  Now it is time for mental health nurses and others interested in perinatal mental health to continue the work by sharing information, resources and camaraderie with mental health nurses from Pacific Island nations: they are our wantoks.

Cool Connections (via Twitter)

PNG Wantoks:

JCU Wantoks

Paul McNamara, 31st July 2013

Perinatal Mental Health Workshop: an experiment in social media enhanced education

The Workshop

The perinatal mental health workshop goes for 4 hours, with three scheduled 5-10 minute breaks. It has been repeated and refined dozens of times over the last 12 years (pretty sure I did the first one in 2001). I haven’t kept count of how many people have done it – it would be a number somewhere either side of 300, I guess. The workshop is based on adult learning principles and is divided into two parts: knowing (empirical learnings) and doing (experiential learning). An example of the flyer/agenda for the workshop is here (PDF). The primary message I want (hope) participants to take home is that by being authentic, emotionally intelligent professionals we can make our screening more sensitive and our responses more therapeutic.

In the perinatal mental health workshop we talk together. There is nearly always more than 100 years of clinical experience in the room, sometimes there is over 200 years of experience in the room.

There is no powerpoint presentation. There are nurses, midwives, indigenous health workers and allied health staff. We share our knowledge, our experiences and our stories with each other as a group. There is a lot of information to get through; the workshop facilitator’s job is to keep the mutual sharing of information safe, and to give it structure, credibility and meaning. The facilitator makes sure to keep the agenda and the learning objectives on track. As is befitting of an adult education session, the workshop is a conversation.

Maybe Twitter is just another conversation. A conversation not as intimate or in-depth as the one held in the workshop, but a conversation that isn’t restricted to one specific place or one specific group of people.

education

#bePNDaware data & screenshot courtesy of the Healthcare Hashtag Project via http://www.symplur.com

The Experiment

As an experiment on 8th February 2013 I used social media (this Twitter account linked to a Facebook page) to bookmark resources for participants and share them with anyone else who is interested. Using HootSuite 19 pre-scheduled Tweets with the #bePNDaware hashtag were sent before or during the workshop. One Tweet was sent during a break in the Workshop (the one about Circle of Security – I was rushing and sent a broken link – oops), and one after the workshop had finished (the one with the photo of the whiteboard).

The scheduling of tweets allowed the facilitator to be fully present during the workshop, while simultaneously making links to the resources/topics discussed in the workshop readily available to workshop participants and a broader audience.

9 other Twitter accounts retweeted 6 of the original tweets; the tweet re the Clinical Practice Guidelines was retweeted 3 times.  In all, between 7:00am and 7:00pm on 08/02/13 (Cairns time) there were 30 workshop-related Tweets which, through the compounding effects of social media, yielded a theoretical/potential reach of 17,783 (source). The actual impact would have been much smaller, but is difficult to quantify (for me, anyway).

To see who joined the conversation by retweeting and other data, please visit Symplur.

workshop

Geeky Stuff

I hope you like the video, here’s how it was done:

  • content was compiled, arranged and animated using Prezi
  • the completed Prezi was captured as video using ScreenFlow
  • the music Flying Over The Dateline by Moby is very generously provided free for non-commercial use via mobygratis.com in this instance the licence/approval number is 58935
  • the finished product was uploaded to YouTube

It takes a bit of mucking-around, but it looks/sounds pretty cool, I reckon. I’m not so confident that it will make sense to anyone who isn’t familiar with Twitter, but anyway…

Perinatal Stuff

The links tweeted during the perinatal mental health workshop (in order as they appear in the video and on this Storify) are:

Perinatal Mental Health – Cairns

National Perinatal Depression Initiative

Perinatal Mental Health Clinical Practice Guidelines

Perinatal Mental Health in Indigenous Communities 

Stay Connected, Stay Strong… Before and After Baby

Behind the Mask: the Hidden Struggle of Parenthood

Queensland Centre for Perinatal and Infant Mental Health

Still Face Experiment

Circle of Security

Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale

Just Speak Up

PANDA

mindhealthconnect

Nurturing the Nurturers

Closing Remarks

That’s it for this attempt to use a 4 minute video to give a glimpse of a 4 hour workshop, and to share the idea of using social media as a tool to expand the reach of an education session.

Want to hear something funny? Of the workshop participants that day, two were on a self-imposed period of respite from Facebook, and none of them used Twitter. The experiment in social-media-enhanced-education was more useful to people away from the workshop than in it. Oh well – at least I can send the participants a link to the video now…

As always, your feedback is welcome.

Paul McNamara, 29th May 2013