Monthly Archives: April 2019

How can we be integrated if nobody knows about us? #ACMHN2019

I’ve been asked to be one of the keynote speakers at the 45th International Mental Health Nursing Conference in Sydney, being held from 8th to 10th October 2019 (see the #ACMHN2019 hashtag on Twitter). To be an invited speaker at such a prestigious conference is a pretty big deal to me.

This blog page serves as a place to find my presentation quickly and easily [here], and as a place to collate and list references.

Click to go to Prezi

Bio (from www.acmhn2019.com/speakers)

Paul McNamara has been a nurse since 1988, a mental health nurse since 1993, a credentialed mental health nurse since 2006, and a fellow of ACMHN since 2008. He works as a consultation liaison CNC at Cairns Hospital. Paul also tinkers online quite a bit; he has a social media portfolio built around the homophone “meta4RN”, which can be read as either “metaphor RN” or “meta for RN”.   

Screengrab from the ACMHN2019.com website

More info about the conference here: www.ACMHN2019.com

References/Further Reading 

Altmetric Attention Score for Share or perish: Social media and the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing wiley.altmetric.com/details/62929297

Altmetric Attention Score for Do adult mental health services identify child abuse and neglect? A systematic review wiley.altmetric.com/details/23964454

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. (2014, March 17). Social media policy. Retrieved from www.ahpra.gov.au

Bec @notesforreview (2019, October 2). Because of Twitter I have – ^ academic/clinical knowledge – Learnt about current prof issues – Learnt from experts by experience – Gained new perspectives – Challenged biases – Made wonderful connections – Received & given support – Co-authored an article for ‘s magazine [Tweet]. https://twitter.com/notesforreview/status/1179344079609577472?s=21

Buus Lassen, Neils. (2019, September 11). in ‘Researchers: “We waste time and money writing articles none cares to read”‘, CBS Wire. Retrieved from cbswire.dk/researchers-we-waste-time-and-money-writing-articles-no-one-cares-to-read

Casella, E., Mills, J., & Usher, K. (2014). Social media and nursing practice: Changing the balance between the social and technical aspects of work. Collegian, 21(2), 121–126. www.collegianjournal.com/article/S1322-7696(14)00033-X/abstract

Facebook. (2015). Facebook logo. Retrieved from www.facebookbrand.com

Garfield, Stan. (2016, September 14). 90-9-1 Rule of Thumb: Fact or Fiction? www.linkedin.com/pulse/90-9-1-rule-thumb-fact-fiction-stan-garfield

Google. (2019). Map retrieved from www.google.com.au/maps/place/Cairns

#HealthUpNorth info www.health.qld.gov.au/cairns_hinterland/join-our-team/healthupnorth

#HealthUpNorth pics www.instagram.com/explore/tags/healthupnorth

Li, C. (2009). Foreword. In: S. Israel (Ed). Twitter Ville: How businesses can thrive in the new global neighborhoods. New York: Portfolio. books.google.com.au

Li, C. (2015). Charlene Li photo. Retrieved from www.charleneli.com/about-charlene/reviewer-resources/

Luddites I have known: meta4RN.com/luddites

McNamara, P. (2014). A Nurse’s Guide to Twitter. Retrieved from web.archive.org/web/20190607185707/https://www.ausmed.com.au/twitter-for-nurses

McNamara, P., & Meijome, X. M. (2015). Twitter Para Enfermeras (Spanish/Español).
Retrieved from web.archive.org/web/20151004183805/http://www.ausmed.com.au/es/twitter-para-enfermeras

McNamara, P. (2013) Behave online as you would in real life (letter to the editor), TQN: The Queensland Nurse, June 2013, Volume 32, Number 3, Page 4. meta4RN.com/TQN

McNamara, P. and Usher, K. (2019), Share or perish: Social media and the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 28(4), 960-970. doi:10.1111/inm.12600

Professional use of Twitter: meta4RN.com/poster

New South Wales Nurses and Midwives Association [nswnma]. (2014, July 30). Women now have unmediated access to public conversation via social media for 1st time in history @JaneCaro #NSWNMAconf14 #destroythejoint [Tweet].
Retrieved from twitter.com/nswnma/status/494313737575096321

Nurse and Midwife Blogroll www.nurseuncut.com.au/blog-roll

Salzmann‐Erikson, M. (2018), Mental health nurses’ use of Twitter for professional purposes during conference participation using #acmhn2016. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27: 804-813. doi:10.1111/inm.12367

Thinking Health Communication? Think Mobile. meta4RN.com/mobile

Twitter. (2015). Twitter logo. Retrieved from about.twitter.com/press/brand-assets

Wall Media. (2015). Jane Caro photo. Retrieved from wallmedia.com.au/jane-caro/

Ward, Kylie. (2019, May 21). Nurses: the hidden healthcare professionals. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved from www.smh.com.au/healthcare/nurses-the-hidden-healthcare-professionals-20190521-p51pq2.html

Wilson, R., Ranse, J., Cashin, A., & McNamara, P. (2014). Nurses and Twitter: The good, the bad, and the reluctant. Collegian, 21(2), 111–119. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2013.09.003

WordPress. (2015). WordPress logo. Retrieved from wordpress.org/about/logos/

Wozniak, H., Uys, P., & Mahoney, M. J. (2012). Digital communication in a networked world. In J. Higgs, R. Ajjawi, L. McAllister, F. Trede, & S. Loftus (Eds.), Communication in the health sciences (3rd ed., pp. 150–162). South Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Ye Olde Yahoo CL Nurse eMail Network meta4RN.com/email

YouTube. (2015). YouTube logo. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/yt/brand/downloads.html

 

End 

Thanks for reading this far. You might be the only person who has. 🙂

As always, your feedback is welcome via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 4 October 2019

Short URL meta4RN.com/ACMHN2019

10 Delirium Misconceptions

This table/info extracted from Oldham et al (2018) is too handy not to share:

PDF version [easy to print]: 10DeliriumMisconceptions

Text version [just putting it here so that it’s searchable; hello google :-)]

1.
Misconception: This patient is oriented to person, place, and time. They’re not delirious.
Best Evidence: Delirium evaluation minimally requires assessing attention, orientation, memory, and the thought process, ideally at least once per nursing shift, to capture daily fluctuations in mental status.
2.
Misconception: Delirium always resolves.
Best Evidence: Especially in cognitively vulnerable patients, delirium may persist for days or even months after the proximal “causes” have been addressed.
3.
Misconception: We should expect frail, older patients to get confused at times, especially after receiving pain medication.
Best Evidence: Confusion in frail, older patients always requires further assessment.
4.
Misconception: The goal of a delirium work-up is to find the main cause of delirium.
Best Evidence: Delirium aetiology is typically multifactorial.
5.
Misconception: New-onset psychotic symptoms in late life likely represents primary mental illness.
Best Evidence: New delusions or hallucinations, particularly nonauditory, in middle age or later deserve evaluation for delirium or another medical cause.
6.
Misconception: Delirium in patients with dementia is less important because these patients are already confused at baseline.
Best Evidence: Patients with dementia deserve even closer monitoring for delirium because of their elevated delirium risk and because delirium superimposed on dementia indicates marked vulnerability.
7.
Misconception: Delirium treatment should include psychotropic medication.
Best Evidence: They are best used judiciously, if at all, for specific behaviours or symptoms rather than delirium itself.
8.
Misconception: The patient is delirious due to a psychiatric cause.
Best Evidence: Delirium always has a physiological cause.
9.
Misconception: It’s often best to let quiet patients rest.
Best Evidence: Hypoactive delirium is common and often under-recognized.
10.
Misconception: Patients become delirious just from being in the intensive care unit.
Best Evidence:  Delirium in the intensive care unit, as with delirium occurring in any setting, is caused by physiological and pharmacological insults.

Source/Reference

Oldham, M., Flanagan, N., Khan, A., Boukrina, O. & Marcantonio, E. (2018) Responding to Ten Common Delirium Misconceptions With Best Evidence: An Educational Review for Clinicians. The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 30:1, 51-57.
doi.org/10.1176/appi.neuropsych.17030065

End

This is the least original blog post I’ve written. All I’ve done is transpose a table from this paper.

Why bother? So I can quickly and easily share it at work. I have conversations about this stuff a lot, especially misconceptions 1, 7 and 8. It’s handy to have an accessible and credible source to support these discussions.

That’s it. Visit the journal article yourself for elaboration about the misconceptions and evidence of delirium: doi.org/10.1176/appi.neuropsych.17030065

Paul McNamara, 18 April 2019

Short URL meta4RN.com/10Delirium