Category Archives: Blog

Positive Practice Environment (the other PPE)

At this point in time (the beginning of April 2020) PPE is popping-up in news and social media feeds frequently. Understandably, with the outbreak of the #COVID19 pandemic, clinicians are much more conscious of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) than usual. Even crusty old mental health nurses like me have revisited and refreshed our knowledge on PPE.

That’s sensible. It’s also sensible to acknowledge that there’s more than one type of PPE.

Positive Practice Environment (PPE)

Today some nurses who work on a ward receiving patients suspected/confirmed to have COVID-19 identified elements that are contributing to their ward working well. Although there’s still some anxiety, of course, generally it is a PPE (positive practice environment). Some of the things nursing staff identified were:

  1. Team Nursing. The RNs highlighted this as a part of the PPE. In a team you never feel like it’s your burden to bear alone, there’s someone to check with donning and doffing personal protective equipment, and there’s always someone to help if you’re in the isolation room and need something extra.
  2. Communication. Communciation within the nursing team, and between the nursing staff and senior medical staff is much better than usual. Regular meetings both formal and informal are really helpful.
  3. Working Smarter. For example: before entering an isolation room, call the patient on their bedside/mobile phone to see if they need anything extra. Similarly, making an arrangement with the patient that they can buzz or phone if they need anything. Increased use of phone = decreased frequency of entering isolation room = decreased use of personal protective equipment.
  4. Getting Smarter. Asking questions and brainstorming solutions. Everyone acknowledges that they aren’t experienced or experts in pandemics, and that collaborative care is the only way to problem-solve the way forward. Patients generate solutions too
  5. Staying Focused. There is so much information swirling about regarding COVID-19, that it is important to limit the sources and exposure. We need to trust the health department that employs us to give us the correct information at the correct time. We can’t afford the time or mental/emotional energy to look at everything that’s out there.
  6. Downtime is Sacred. When everything at work seems to have a COVID-19 twist to it, it’s important to shield against overload. Strategies include:
    • Don’t watch the news, watch a movie.
    • Be careful how much time we spend in the social media echo chamber.
    • Switch off social media and the TV and listen to music.
    • Ask friends and family not to use “the C word” around you.

Downtime is Sacred.

Three Final Thoughts

One
It’s not just about wearing PPE (as in personal protection equipment) it’s about creating a PPE (as in positive practice environment) too. Nobody pretends for a moment that there are not more and/or better ideas than those above, but being intentional about both lots of PPE is helping.

Two
What’s more contagious: COVID-19 or anxiety?

Three
I can’t believe that it’s been less than 2 months since the term “COVID-19” was first coined. It has infected nearly every news article and conversation since early February 2020.

End

That’s it. Thanks for reading.

As always your feedback is invited via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 1 April 2020

Short URL meta4RN.com/PPE

Clean Hands. Clear Head.

Part 1. Clean Hands. Clear Head.

“Clean Hands. Clear Head.” is an animation of a mindfulness script that distills the content of my 2016 blog post “Hand Hygiene and Mindful Moments” into a short (less than 2 minutes) video. The voice part was recorded on an iPhone at a hospital sink #authentic. The visuals were done on Prezi.

Here’s a link to the Prezi version of “Clean Hands. Clear Head.” prezi.com/jehramlhdkcm

Addit 29/03/20: to my surprise, some people want a text version. I won’t write out the whole thing (too long, a bit dull), but below are some key phrases:

This is my mindful moment.
The anxiety and tension will be washed away.
I will rub in the resilience and kindness that sustains me.
After 20 seconds or so I will pretend I’m TayTay, and shake it off. 🙂
I will smile, then will intentionally slow my breathing.
Me and my hands will be safe.

Feels free to use/modify PRN. I would be grateful for source attribution as “meta4RN.com/head”
Just in case it’s handy here is a PDF: CleanHandsClearHead
And here is a MS Word version: CleanHandsClearHead

Part 2. Surviving Emotionally Taxing Work Environments. March 2020 version.

On a related topic, for the last few years I’ve facilitated many hour-long, interactive sessions called “Self Care: Surviving Emotionally Taxing Work Environments.” for my fellow nurses at the hospital where I work. As at March 2020, I’m not confident that we’ll have an opportunity to meet face-to-face as a group all that often, so I’ve tweaked the session, tried to cut-down on the rambling, and have switched from hour-long interactive, to 20 minutes of well-intentioned, a tad-amateurish, youtube video embedded below:


Self Care: Surviving Emotionally Taxing Work Environments. March 2020 version.
(video, 20 mins)

Here’s a link to the Prezi version of “Self Care: Surviving Emotionally Taxing Work Environments. March 2020 version”: prezi.com/xcejt9pgd0b3

Part 3. References & Resources.

I’m recycling and combining a lot of old ideas for the March 2020 version of  “Self Care: Surviving Emotionally Taxing Work Environments.” Self-plagiarism? Nah – it’s a groovy remix of some favourite old songs. Regular visitors to meta4RN.com may recognise the repetition, and be quite bored with me using the website as a place to store updated versions of old stuff. Sorry about that, but it’s just so damn convenient. 🙂

Here are the resources and references used in the presentation: (because I’m recycling old ideas this list is ridiculously self-referential).

Australian College of Mental Health Nurses [www.acmhn.org], Australian College of Nursing [www.acn.edu.au], and Australian College of Midwives [www.midwives.org.au] (2019) Joint Position Statement: Clinical Supervision for Nurses + Midwives. Released online April 2019, PDF available via each organisation’s website, and here: ClinicalSupervisionJointPositionStatement

Australian Government (24 March 2020) Coronavirus (COVID-19) current situation and case numbers
www.health.gov.au/news/health-alerts/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov-health-alert

Basic Life Support Procedure
https://qheps.health.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0030/607098/pro_basiclifesprt.pdf

Eales, Sandra. (2018). A focus on psychological safety helps teams thrive. InScope, No. 08., Summer 2018 edition, published by Queensland Nurses and Midwives Union on 13/12/18, pages 58-59. Eales2018

Emotional Aftershocks (the story of Fire Extinguisher Guy & Nursing Ring Theory) meta4RN.com/aftershocks

Employee Assistance Service (via Queensland Health intranet)
qheps.health.qld.gov.au/hr/staff-health-wellbeing/counselling-support

Employee Assistance Service (via Benestar – the company that CHHHS contracts out to)
benestar.com

Football, Nursing and Clinical Supervision (re validating protected time for reflection and skill rehearsal) meta4RN.com/footy

Hand Hygiene and Mindful Moments (re insitu self-care strategies) meta4RN.com/hygiene

Lai. J, Ma. S, Wang. Y, et al. (23 March 2020) Factors Associated With Mental Health Outcomes Among Health Care Workers Exposed to Coronavirus Disease 2019. JAMA Network Open.
jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2763229

Lalochezia (getting sweary doesn’t necessarily mean getting abusive) meta4RN.com/lalochezia

Nurse & Midwife Support nmsupport.org.au  phone 1800 667 877
– we have specifically targeted 24/7 confidential support available

Nurses, Midwives, Medical Practitioners, Suicide and Stigma (re the alarming toll of those who undertake emotional labour) meta4RN.com/stigma

Nurturing the Nurturers (the Pit Head Baths and clinical supervision stories) meta4RN.com/nurturers

Queensland Health. (2009). Clinical Supervision Guidelines for Mental Health Services. PDF

Spector, P., Zhiqing, Z. & Che, X. (2014) Nurse exposure to physical and nonphysical violence, bullying, and sexual harassment: A quantitative review. International Journal of Nursing Studies. Vol 50(1), pp 72-84. www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020748913000357

That was bloody stressful! What’s next?
Web: meta4RN.com/bloody
QHEPS: https://qheps.health.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0038/555779/That-was-bloody-stressful.pdf

Zero Tolerance for Zero Tolerance (a reframing of reducing aggression) meta4RN.com/zero

End

Thanks for visiting. Let’s join the kindness pandemic to offset some of the crap that goes with the COVID19 pandemic.

As always, your feedback is welcome in the comments section below.

Stay safe.

Paul McNamara, 25 March 2020

Short URL: meta4RN.com/head

Creative Commons Licence
Clean Hands. Clear Head. by Paul McNamara is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

School Based Youth Health Nurse (SBYHN)

Recently I received a Facebook invite to a 20 year reunion of Cairns High School Students who completed year 12 in 1999. Cue nostalgia.

The Cairns Post, 20 February 1999, page 19.

In 1999 I was one of 25 Registered Nurses employed by Queensland Health to pilot the School Based Youth Health Nurse Program. I was the only male in the cohort, and one of two who also had mental health qualifications (all of us shared a background in general nursing). The two schools I covered were Cairns State High School and Yarrabah State School.

Some of the Cairns State High School students autographed a uniform for me as a parting gift.

School Based Youth Health Nurses are Queensland Health employees who provide a service that is delivered in partnership with Education Queensland to address the health and wellbeing of the young people and school communities.

The roles and functions of a School Based Youth Health Nurse includes:

  • Promoting health and wellbeing with a “whole school approach” to support the development of healthy school environments.
  • Making recommendations on health resources to support curriculum, teaching and learning activities in schools.
  • Individual health consultations with assessment, support, health information and referral options related to:
    • Healthy eating and exercise
    • Relationships
    • Personal and family problems
    • Feeling sad, worried and angry
    • Sexual health
    • Smoking, alcohol and other drugs
    • Growth and development

To clarify, the School Based Youth Health Nurse does not provide medical treatments, first aid, medications, physical examinations, or ongoing counseling.

It was a great job – not without its challenges, of course – but great all the same.

My single favourite part of the job was interacting with school students individually and in small groups. I was blown-away by how worldly and mature most of them were. As an example, when I was setting-up a space where I could chat to students confidentially a year 10 student swung past to introduce himself, saying something like, “Hi I’m Nathan. I started on antidepressant medication a couple of months ago, and I think I’m going OK now, but I just wanted to meet you in case I need to speak to you later sometime.” I was nothing like that sensible when I was in year 10.

Actually, I wish I was that sensible now. I’m still trying to get my head around the fact that those students are older now than I was then!

End

That’s it for this one. Short and sweet.

My main motivator for this blog post is to store the pics online so I can find them PRN, and easily share them with the peeps who were kind enough to remember me when planning their 20 year reunion. Have fun guys! 🙂

Interested in reading more about the SBYHN role? The article ‘No such thing as a typical day in the life of a school-based youth nurse’ may be of interest. 

As always, you’re welcome to leave feedback in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 29 February 2020

Short URL: meta4RN.com/SBYHN

BTW: the section in blue above is mostly a copy and paste from here

Nurses on the 2020 Australia Day Honours List

Extracting information from www.gg.gov.au/australian-honours-and-awardsaustralian-honours-lists/australia-day-2020-honours-list, below are the Nurses named on the 2019 Australia Day Honours List.

Margaret Alice Aldous OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Benalla, Victoria
For service to nursing.

Cooinda Village
– Chief Executive/Director of Nursing, since 2008.

Benalla Rotary Club
– Vocational/Membership Committee, 2014-2016.
– Student Councillor, 2012-2014.

Benalla Hospital
– Quality Manager, 2001-2008.
– Nurse Unit Manager Home, Nursing Services, 1997-2001.
– Team Leader, Critical Incident Debriefing.
– Nurse Unit Manager, Accident and Emergency and Hospital Supervisor, 1996-1997.
– Palliative Care Supervisor, 1989-1994, seconded to Hume Region North East Victoria, 1995.
– Provided first palliative care education service to Benalla Hospital and medical staff.
– Grief Counsellor.
– Mentor to Junior Staff.
– Hospital Supervisor, 1982-1989.
– Nurse Unit Manager Midwifery, 1979-1981.
– Staff Nurse 1977-1979.
– Registered Midwife, 1977-2016.
– Registered Nurse’ 1975- current

Alfred Hospital Melbourne
– Staff Nurse, 1976.
– Trainee Nurse, 1972-1975.
– Trainee Midwife, 1975-1976.

Royal Women’s Hospital
– Trainee Midwife, 1975-1976

********************************************

Coralie Elizabeth Brannelly OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Moulden, Northern Territory
For service to the community of Darwin.

Lions Australia
– Secretary, Palmerston Lions Club, 2014-2017, 2019.
– Co-Founder, Palmerston Lions Club, 2014.
– Former Member, Darwin Nightcliff Lions Club.

Professional
– Primary Health Care Respiratory Nurse, Northern Territory Department of Health, since 2009.

********************************************

Deborah Kenna OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Orange, New South Wales
For service to community health.

Western NSW Local Health District
– Registered Nurse, Health Service Manager
– Aboriginal Health, Chronic Care, Integrated Care 2001 – 2017
– District Manager, Chronic Care
– Aboriginal Primary Health Care Practitioner, 2001-2006.

Orange Aboriginal Medical Service (OAMS)
– Founding Community Board Member, planning and development, 2005.
– Chair, 2006.
– Director, Board Member, 2002-2007.
– Member, Clinical Governance Patient Safety/ Quality Governance Group, current.

Other Voluntary
– Member, National Heart Foundation Aboriginal Health Advisory Committee (NAHAC), 2011-2018.
– Deputy Chair, NAHAC, 2017-2018.
– Member, Cardiovascular Health Advisory Committee.
– Member, NSW Better Cardiac Care Aboriginal Ministers Advisory Group, 2016-2017.
– Member, National Cervical and Breast Screen Advisory Group, 2013-2016.
– Member, Ministry of Health Chronic Care Advisory Group, 2012-2017.
– Member, Aboriginal Advisory Group, National Cancer Institute and Research, since 2015 – current

Professional Memberships
– Australian College of Nursing.
– Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINAM).
– Council of Remote Area Nurses Australia, (CRANA).

Awards and recognition include:
– Female Person of the Year, Orange NAIDOC Community Awards, 2007 and 2014.
– Employee of the Year, Orange Community Awards, 2009.

********************************************

Lilian Selina Leonard OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Pearcedale, Victoria
For service to community health.

Voluntary
– Founder/Treasurer/Committee Member, Young Ostomates United Support Group, since 1989.
– OutReach Stoma/Continence/Breast Care Service, East Gippsland, 1998-2004.
– East Gippsland Cancer Support Group, 1999-2004.
– North Western Breast Cancer Support Group, 1997-2004.
– Founder, Preston and Northcote Community Hospital Ostomy Support Group, 1987.

Nursing
– Registered Nurse Div. 1: Graduated from the Melbourne School of Nursing, 1959.
– Stomal Therapy Certificate, Mayfield Centre, 1979.
– Graduate Diploma in Human Relationships Education, Melbourne University, 1988.
– Registered Nurse, Stomal Therapy, Cabrini Hospital, Preston, Northcote Community Hospital (PANCH), The Northern Hospital (Northern Health) and Bairnsdale Regional Health Service, 1979-2004.
– President/Committee Member, Australian Association of Stomal Therapy Nurses Victoria, early 1980s.

Awards and recognition includes:
– Recipient, Advance Australia Foundation Award, 1993.
– Inaugural Portrait Gallery Inductee at MacRobertston Girls High School, 2008.

********************************************

Matthew Alan Luther OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Gordon, Australian Capital Territory
For service to nursing.

Nursing
– Co-Director, Emergency Department, Calvary Public Hospital, Bruce, Canberra, current.
– Nurse Practitioner, since 2004.
– Midwife, since 2002.
– Registered Nurse, since 1999.
– Credentialed Emergency Nurse.

Other Medical and Community service includes
– Vice-Chair, ACT Branch, Australian Resuscitation Council, current.
– Guest Lecturer, Australian Catholic University, current.
– Mass Gathering/Event Nurse Practitioner, ACT Branch, St John’s Ambulance Australia, since 2012.
– Member, Australian Medical Assistance Team (AusMAT), since 2010.
– Volunteer Fire Fighter, ACT Rural Fire Service, since 1992.
– Course Director, Advanced Life Support, Australian Resuscitation Council, current.

Royal Australian Air Force Reserve
– Specialist Nurse, Military Critical Care Aeromedical Team, since 2006.
– Patient Movement Cell, Deployment, Iraq, 2018.
– Aeromedical Evacuation Nurse, Philippines Assist, Humanitarian Aid, 2012 and Deployment Middle East, 2012.
– Emergency Nurse, Pacific Partnership, Humanitarian Aid, 2008.

Memberships
– Fellow, Australian College of Nursing.
– Fellow, College of Emergency Nursing Australasia.
– Fellow, Australian College of Nurse Practitioners.

Awards and recognition include:
– Excellence in Management Practice, ACT Health, 2016.
– ACT Nursing Team of the Year, ACT Health, 2016.
– Australia Day Medallion, for service to Calvary Health Care, 2008.

********************************************

Annette Elizabeth Moehead OAM PSM
Public Service Medal (PSM)
Wollongbar, New South Wales
For outstanding public service to mental health care of aged persons in New South Wales.

Ms Moehead has provided exceptional service to NSW Health since 1973. Specialising in the nursing of dementia and psychogeriatrics for over 30 years she is regarded by nurses and health professionals, locally and nationally, as a leader, mentor and expert in dementia and delirium care.

An outstanding and innovative influence in the psychogeriatrics sector, she has placed great emphasis on the recognition, assessment and management of cognitive disorders at a state and national level. She established the first dementia day care service outside the metropolitan area; setting up and delivering one of the early dementia pilot programs in order to establish a coordinated approach to delivering community mental health services to older persons.

She has also been a major influencer in the development of the NSW Dementia Action Plan and has been instrumental in the development and implementation of delirium care as a National Standard.

Currently as Nurse Practitioner Psychogeriatrics, Northern New South Wales Local Health District, Ms Moehead’s dedication and commitment to influencing the knowledge and skill of the healthcare workforce in delivering quality clinical care has earnt her the respect and acknowledgement from her patients, peers and the community of New South Wales.

********************************************

Pauline Margaret Nugent AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
East Melbourne, Victoria
For significant service to education, and to nursing.

Service includes:

Australian Catholic University
– Provost, since 2012.
– Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), 2011-2012.
– Dean of Health Sciences, 2007-2011.

Deakin University
– Inaugural Chair of Nursing Development, 2003-2006.
– Head, School of Nursing, 1997-2006.

Southern Health
– Chair, 2005-2009.
– Board Member, 2001-2009.

Australian Department of Health
– Member, National Nursing and Nursing Education Taskforce, 2004-2007.
– Member, Australian Health Workforce Advisory Committee, 2000-2007.

Australian Council of Deans of Nursing and Midwifery
– President, 1999-2003.
– Executive Member, 1999-2005.
– Member, Victorian and Tasmanian Deans of Nursing, 1997-2007.
– Chair, Victorian Deans of Nursing, 1997-1999.

Other
– Member of the Health Professions Education Standing Group, Victorian Department of Health, since 2013.
– Board Member, Eastern Health, 2009-2018.
– Member, Nurse Practitioner Implementation Committee, Victorian Board of the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, 2000-2001.
– Chair, Education Sub-Committee, Nurse Recruitment and Retention Committee, Victorian Department of Health, 2000.

Awards and recognition includes:
– Telstra Businesswoman of the Year, 2009.

********************************************

Sabine Cornelia Phillips AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Port Melbourne, Victoria
For significant service to aged welfare, and to the legal profession.

Benetas Aged Care (Victoria)
– Director and Chair, Clinical Governance Committee, 2010-2012.
– Board Member, 2009-2012.

Uniting Agewell
– Board Member, since 2015.
– Member, Clinical Governance Committee, current.
– Member, Audit and Risk Committee.

Northern Health
– Board Member, 2007-2016.
– Member, Audit and Risk Committee, 2013-2016.
– Chair, Clinical Governance Committee, 2009-2013.

Other
– Board Member, Dementia Australia, 2016-2017.
– Board Member, Australian Children Education and Quality Agency, 2014-2017.
– Board Member, Wintringham Aged Care and Wintringham Housing.
– Fellow, Australian College of Nursing, current.

Professional
– Partner, Health and Aged Care Law, Gadens Lawyers, since 2016.
– Lawyer and Partner, Russell Kennedy Lawyers, 2004-2015.
– Fellow, Australian Institute of Company Directors, current.

********************************************

Sheila Ellen Simpson OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Scone, New South Wales
For service to nursing.

Nursing
– Clinical Nurse Consultant and Tuberculosis Coordinator, South Western Sydney Local Health District, 1987-2018.
– Clinical Nurse Consultant, South Western Sydney Local Health District, 1987-2018.
– Nurse, Liverpool Chest Clinic, Liverpool Hospital, 1984-2018.
– Charge Nurse, Randwick Chest Hospital (now known as Prince of Wales Hospital), 1972-1984

Other
– Member, Projects Advisory Group for the Australian Respiratory Council, for many years.
– Member, NSW TB Advisory Committee.
– Co-Author, ‘Recurrence of tuberculosis at a Sydney chest clinic between 1994 and 2006: reactivation or reinfection?’

********************************************

End

Please let me know via the comments section below if I missed any nurses on the 2020 Australia Day Honours List. Naturally, I’m happy to correct any oversights.

Paul McNamara, 26 January 2020

Short URL: meta4RN.com/Honours2020

Addit

 

20 Tweetable Fun Facts for 2020: Year of the Nurse #Nurses2020

1
World Health Organisation designated the year 2020 as the “Year of the Nurse and Midwife”, in honor of the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.who.int/hrh/news/2019/2020year-of-nurses/en/


2
Florence Nightingale was named after the city in which she was born (Florence, Italy). #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/timelines/z92hsbk

3
Amongst Florence Nightingale’s achievements was the introduction of female nurses into military hospitals. Yes: FEMALE nurses! 🙂 #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://florence-nightingale.co.uk/the-crimean-war/

4
Australia’s Nurses and Midwives are
🔴 88.8% Female
🔴 11.2% Male
🔴 <0.1% Intersex or Indeterminate
#Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD19%2f29215&dbid=AP&chksum=pxYq4Vv8xOa1OH59ah8pUw%3d%3d (Table 10.1)

5
The International Council of Nurses (@ICNurses) was born in 1899 on the busy intersection of woman’s rights, social progressivism and healthcare reform. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: http://icntimeline.org/page/0003.html

6
Before 2020 Year of the Nurse kicked-off there were already 3000 Tweets using the #Nurses2020 hashtag (sent from 1,800+ Twitter accounts) #Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/Nurses2020/analytics/?hashtag=Nurses2020&fdate=12%2F1%2F2019&shour=6&smin=0&tdate=12%2F30%2F2019&thour=6&tmin=0

7
56% of Australia’s registered health workforce are Nurses and/or Midwives. #Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.ahpra.gov.au/Publications/Annual-reports/Annual-Report-2019/Overview.aspx

8
In Australia there are:
🔴 371,902 Nurses without a Midwifery qualification
🔴 26,047 Nurses and Midwives (dual registration, that is)
🔴 5,583 Midwives without a Nursing qualification
#Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD19%2f29215&dbid=AP&chksum=pxYq4Vv8xOa1OH59ah8pUw%3d%3d (Table 2.1)

9
35.7% of Australia’s Nurses and Midwives are aged over 50 (not that there’s anything wrong with that) #Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD19%2f29215&dbid=AP&chksum=pxYq4Vv8xOa1OH59ah8pUw%3d%3d (Table 7.1)

10
Most of Australia’s 397,949 Nurses have a general qualification, but some do not. They have a sole qualification, ie:
🔴 2,243 in mental health nursing
🔴 579 in paediatric nursing
🔴 115 in disability nursing
#Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD19%2f29215&dbid=AP&chksum=pxYq4Vv8xOa1OH59ah8pUw%3d%3d (Tables 2.1 and 6.1)

11
1 in 30 people working in Australia is a Nurse and/or Midwife (ie: 3.33% of the Australian workforce are Nurses/Midwives) #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.ahpra.gov.au/Publications/Annual-reports/Annual-Report-2019/Overview.aspx

12
Top three places where Nurses and Midwives employed in Australia received their initial nursing and midwifery qualification:
1️⃣ Australia (79.6%)
2️⃣ England (4.7%)
3️⃣ India (2.8%)
#Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery-workforce-2015/contents/who-are-nurses-and-midwives

13
In per capita terms, remote Australia has a larger supply of Nurses and Midwives than Australia’s capital cities. #Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery-workforce-2015/contents/how-many-nurses-and-midwives-are-there (Figure 3)

14
Principal area of main job for Australian Nurses (top five):
1️⃣ Aged Care
2️⃣ Medical
3️⃣ Surgical
4️⃣ Peri-Operative
5️⃣ Mental Health
#Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery-workforce-2015/contents/work-characteristics-of-nurses-and-midwives (Figure 1)

15
Australia’s health professional registration agency (@AHPRA) does not recognise any Nursing Specialities, but recognises 23 Specialities in Medicine (and over 60 sub-specialities) 🙄#Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Sources: http://meta4RN.com/credhttp://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au + https://www.medicalboard.gov.au/registration/types/specialist-registration/medical-specialties-and-specialty-fields.aspx

16
There are over 22,000 nurses working in mental health settings in Australia, over 3,200 of them are @ACMHN members, 1235 of them are @ACMHN Credentialed. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Sources: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/mental-health-services/mental-health-services-in-australia/report-contents/mental-health-workforce/mental-health-nursing-workforce + http://www.acmhn.org/images/stories/News/AnnualReports/ACMHN_Annual_Report_2017_-_2018.pdf  + http://www.acmhn.org/images/stories/Resources/2019_Media_Kit.pdf 

17
Australians rated Nurses as the most ethical and honest profession each year for 21 years in a row (1994-2015). #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: http://www.roymorgan.com/findings/6188-roy-morgan-image-of-professions-2015-201504280343

18
There are over 60 separate Nursing Organisations in Australia #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Sources: http://meta4RN.com/colleges + http://www.conno.org.au/members + http://www.nurseinfo.com.au/links.html

19
Australian Nurses and Midwives have free access to ‪@NMSupportAU: a 24/7 national support service providing confidential advice and referral. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nmsupport.org.au

20
Representing more than 275,000 members, the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (‪@anmf_federal ) is Australia’s largest national union. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: http://anmf.org.au/pages/about-the-anmf

End

Keen-eyed meta4RN readers will recognise some of this content from this 2015 post: https://meta4RN.com/FunFacts – this post isn’t self-plagiarism, it’s just a funky new remix of a favourite old song. 🙂

As always, your feedback is welcome in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 1 January 2020

Short URL: meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Email to a person who experiences persistent pain

You may have read about nurses as prescribers of digital therapeutics in editorials, letters, journal articles or blogs. This is one of two blog posts demonstrating email as an adjunct to face-to-face support, and as an example of how a nurse can use/prescribe digital therapy. Naturally, it comes with the usual disclaimers about these being examples that may be of use to adapt for you/your practice, not an instruction/template for practice. One of the goals of this blog is to share ideas – that’s what this blog post is about.

Below is a sample email to a person who experiences persistent pain:

From: Paul McNamara
Sent: Friday, 27 December 2019, 11:50 AM
To: paula@emailaddressesarenotcasesensitive.com.au

Subject: Suggestions

Hi Paula

It was good to meet with you today. Here are some of the ideas/suggestions we were talking about:

1. North Queensland Persistent Pain Management Service (NQPPMS)
Sus-out the info on the website: www.health.qld.gov.au/clinical-practice/referrals/statewide-specialist-services/persistent-pain, and if you think it’s something that might be helpful have a chat to your GP about making a referral. There’s usually a bit of a wait to be seen face-to-face: all the more reason to get the ball rolling sooner rather later, I reckon.

2. Free online pain course
This course by MindSpot is considered credible, and would be good “homework” to try for yourself while waiting to hear back from NQPPMS people. I’ve heard good things about it from other nurses and doctors, but haven’t heard back from any patients about it yet. If you do go ahead and give it a go, I’d be keen to hear what you think of it.
Course via mindspot.org.au/pain-course

3. Counselling/psychological support
Like we were talking about today: the brain lives in the body, so of course the body and the brain influence each other. Pain affects-, and is affected by-, both the brain and the body.

For face-to-face support, the easiest way to access that is via a GP Mental Health Plan/Referral – check with the reception staff @ your GP’s rooms if you decide to ahead with this (a lot of GPs prefer a double appointment when doing a Mental Health Plan/Referral).

If getting to see someone face-to-face is going to be a bit tricky,  there is free, confidential 24/7 telephone and online counselling support available via NQConnect: phone 1300 059 625 and/or visit nqconnect.com.au

4. The just-in-case bit
I have no concerns about you being profoundly depressed or suicidal at the moment Paula, but we know that living with pain can be a risk factor for suicidal thoughts. Just in case you get to that dark place again, It would be a good idea if you store the 24 hour number for community mental health’s Acute Care Team in your phone. The number = 1300 64 2255 (1300 MH CALL).

That’s it for me. I hope some of these suggestions are useful Paula – you have a positivity and sense-of-humour that gives me a lot of hope that things will get better. Naturally, I’m happy for you to contact me directly if you’d like clarification or elaboration.

Kind regards,
Paul

.

End Notes

If you’ve seen me in my clinical practice and have received an email similar to the one above, please accept my explanation that this blog post is just to share an idea about integrating digital therapeutics into everyday clinical practice. I’m a bit anxious that seeing the info online rather than as a one-to-one email may call into question the authenticity of the original email. At my end it doesn’t. I do recycle some sentences/paragraphs when I’m emailing a person after meeting them face-to-face, but the email is always tweaked to reflect the uniqueness of each therapeutic engagement. I’d be horrified if the blog post causes offence or dilutes the authenticity of our meeting, and sincerely apologise if it does.

Please also see this blog post’s companion piece, “Email to a suicide survivor“.

As always, your feedback is welcomed in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 27 December 2019

Short URL meta4RN.com/digital01

References/Further Reading

Ferguson, C., Hickman, L., Wright, R., Davidson, P. & Jackson, D. (2018) Preparing nurses to be prescribers of digital therapeutics, Contemporary Nurse, 54(4-5): 345-349.
doi: 10.1080/10376178.2018.1486943

Søgaard Neilsen, A. & Wilson, R.L. (2019) Combining e‐mental health intervention development with human computer interaction (HCI) design to enhance technology‐facilitated recovery for people with depression and/or anxiety conditions: An integrative literature review. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 28(1): 22-39.
doi: 10.1111/inm.12527

Wilson, R.L. (2018) The right way for nurses to prescribe, administer and critique digital therapies, Contemporary Nurse, 54(4-5): 543-545.
doi: 10.1080/10376178.2018.1507679

Email to a suicide survivor

You may have read about nurses as prescribers of digital therapeutics in editorials, letters, journal articles or blogs. This is one of two blog posts demonstrating email as an adjunct to face-to-face support, and as an example of how a nurse can use/prescribe digital therapy. Naturally, it comes with the usual disclaimers about these being examples that may be of use to adapt for you/your practice, not an instruction/template for practice. One of the goals of this blog is to share ideas – that’s what this blog post is about.

Below is a sample email to a person who has survived suicide:

From: Paul McNamara
Sent: Friday, 27 December 2019, 11:50 AM
To: paula@emailaddressesarenotcasesensitive.com.au

Subject: Suggestions

Hi Paula

Thanks for speaking with Molly and I this morning. This email is in follow-up to some of the suggestions we discussed:

1. Safety Plan
In recent years we’ve been thinking more about safety-planning for people who experience suicidal thoughts. Beyondblue have a free App called “BeyondNow” which guides us through the sort of things to include on a safety plan.
Here’s the link: www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/beyondnow-suicide-safety-planning

Having the safety plan on the phone can be pretty handy, and you can share the plan via email with your GP, trusted friend(s), psychologist etc. If you do decide to use it, and would like the hospital and/or community mental health to have a copy of your safety plan, I’m happy for you to email it to me, and I’ll put it on our system.

2. Mindfulness Strategy
Download the SmilingMind App on your phone from here: www.smilingmind.com.au/smiling-mind-app
As with the BeyondNow App, it’s free, evidence-based and endorsed by beyondblue.
I suggest giving it a try. Mindfulness activities like slow breathing and some of the other stress-management tips on the app can sometimes be more effective than medication when it comes to preventing/managing anxiety.

3. Employee Assistance Program vs GP Referral
Like we talked about today, it would be handy to get plugged-in with a specialist mental health professional (eg: Credentialed Mental Health Nurse, Psychologist, Mental Health Social Worker) in private practice for support. The easiest way to access this for employed people is usually via their Employee Assistance Program – your employer does not get told what you’re discussing in sessions. If you’d rather not go via the Employee Assistance Program, you can book a double appointment with your GP to request a Mental Health Plan/Referral.

4. Short term follow-up via ACT
Community mental health’s Acute Care Team (ACT) will make phone contact with you later today/tomorrow, and will arrange to see you face-to-face within the next week. We think it’s important to offer an avenue to emotional support until we’re sure you’re “back on your feet” and/or engaged with a specialist mental health professional.
You can contact ACT on 1300 64 2255 (1300 MH CALL).

5. Finding your way back
Just in case you lose the booklet I gave you this morning, here’s a an online version:
“Finding your way back” (information for people who have attempted suicide)
www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/suicide-prevention/support-and-recovery-strategies/support-after-a-suicide-attempt/finding-your-way-back
You’ll find some good info in that booklet.
Also, the booklet I left for your partner (“Guiding their way back{) is available via the same web page.

It was good to meet you this morning Paula. It’s such a relief that you’re emerging from that dark space you were in a few days ago. I hope this email is helpful to your recovery. Naturally, I’m happy for you to contact me directly if you’d like clarification or elaboration.

Kind regards,
Paul

.

End Notes

If you’ve seen me in my clinical practice and have received an email similar to the one above, please accept my explanation that this blog post is just to share an idea about integrating digital therapeutics into everyday clinical practice. I’m a bit anxious that seeing the info online rather than as a one-to-one email may call into question the authenticity of the original email. At my end it doesn’t. I do recycle some sentences/paragraphs when I’m emailing a person after meeting them face-to-face, but the email is always tweaked to reflect the uniqueness of each therapeutic engagement. I’d be horrified if the blog post causes offence or dilutes the authenticity of our meeting, and sincerely apologise if it does.

Please also see this blog post’s companion piece, “Email to a person who experiences persistent pain“.

As always, your feedback is welcomed in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 27 December 2019

Short URL meta4RN.com/digital01

References/Further Reading

Ferguson, C., Hickman, L., Wright, R., Davidson, P. & Jackson, D. (2018) Preparing nurses to be prescribers of digital therapeutics, Contemporary Nurse, 54(4-5): 345-349.
doi: 10.1080/10376178.2018.1486943

Søgaard Neilsen, A. & Wilson, R.L. (2019) Combining e‐mental health intervention development with human computer interaction (HCI) design to enhance technology‐facilitated recovery for people with depression and/or anxiety conditions: An integrative literature review. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 28(1): 22-39.
doi: 10.1111/inm.12527

Wilson, R.L. (2018) The right way for nurses to prescribe, administer and critique digital therapies, Contemporary Nurse, 54(4-5): 543-545.
doi: 10.1080/10376178.2018.1507679