Tag Archives: conference tweeting

Hand Hygiene and Mindful Moments

Nurses and other health professionals are expected to attend to hand hygiene about eleventy seven times a day. The WHO and HHA recommend 5 moments for hand hygiene: before touching a patient, before clean/aseptic procedures, after body fluid exposure/risk, after touching a patient, and after touching patient surroundings. 57.4% of Australia’s nurses/midwives are hospital/ward-based [source], they’re doing A LOT of hand hygiene. 

On top of that, while they’re going about their business and busyness, ward-based nurses are interrupted 10 times an hour [source]. Yep, every 6 minutes there’s something or somebody distracting us from our tasks and thoughts. Dangerously disorderly much? Hopefully that doesn’t happen to neurosurgeons, commercial airline pilots, tattoo artists or Batman.
Especially Batman. 

batman

Pro-Tip: most of us can not do this at work. Only respond to distractions with face-slapping if you are Batman.

So, here’s the idea: if you’re going to do hand hygiene dozens of times a day anyway, don’t just do it for your patients: do it for yourself too. We’re not cold callous reptilian clinicians, we’re educated warm-blooded mammals who do emotional labour. We need to nurture ourselves if we are to safely continue to nurture others.

poster1

5 moments for hand hygiene & head hygiene!

Turn the 5 moments of hand hygiene into mindful moments. Make the 5 moments for hand hygiene 5 moments for head hygiene too. Yes, clean hands save lives – let’s not forget that clear heads save lives too!

Come up with a process/script that works for you, maybe something a bit like this: 

Mindful Moment (The 30-Second Handrub Version) 

  1. Step towards the pump bottle with intent. This is my mindful moment. I’m taking a brief break. 
  2. Squirt enough to squish. 
  3. The rub is slippery at first. Frictionless fingers feel fine.
  4. Feel the product texture and temperature. The rub is cooler than the air. The rub is cooler than my fingers. It feels nice. 
  5. Start with cleaning. The first half of my hand hygiene routine is about rubbing stuff off. Let the stuff I want to get rid of float away. 
  6. Move on to restoration, healing. The second half of my hand hygiene routine is about rubbing in resilience and health. Let the stuff that sustains me seep into my skin. 
  7. Check in on the breathing. The slower and deeper the better. If the breathing or the brain are running too fast, slow down and repeat steps 5 and 6. 
  8. There’s no rush. Slowly scan the surroundings. With any luck someone from infection control is watching. 
  9. Smile.
  10. Breathing slowly, its time let the air rinse off the residue. 
  11. One more slow breath. Its time to get back to work. 

Mindful Minute (The 60-Second Handwash Version)

  1. Step towards the sink with intent. This is my mindful minute. I’m taking a brief break. 
  2. Let the water flow.
  3. Feel the water flowing over both hands. The water’s warmer than the air. The water’s warmer than my fingers. It feels nice. 
  4. Add soap. It’s slippery. Frictionless fingers feel fine.
  5. Start with cleaning. The first half of your hand hygiene routine is about washing stuff away. Let the stuff you need to get rid of flow down the drain. Let it flow away. 
  6. Move on to restoration, healing. The second half of my hand hygiene routine is about rubbing in resilience and health. Let the stuff that sustains me seep into my skin. 
  7. Check in on the breathing. The slower and deeper the better. If the breathing or the brain are running too fast, slow down and repeat steps 5 and 6. 
  8. There’s no rush. Slowly scan the surroundings. With any luck someone from infection control is watching. 
  9. Smile.
  10. Breathing slowly, its time rinse both hands. 
  11. Breathing slowly, its time to thoroughly dry both hands together. 
  12. Throw the towel in the bin.
  13. One more slow breath. Its time to get back to work. 
poster2

Clean hands save lives. Clear heads save lives too!

Acknowledgements & Context

This is not my original idea. I first stumbled across the idea of combining hand hygiene with head hygiene via Ian Miller‘s November 2013 blog post “mindfulness during handwashing”: http://thenursepath.com/2013/11/18/mindfulnurse-day-8/. I’ve been using the idea myself and suggesting it to colleagues and students ever since. When I left the clinical environment for a few months, I found myself really missing intentionally punctuating my day with mindful moments. Since returning to clinical practice I’ve come to appreciate the strategy even more than I did when I first started using it 3 years ago.

So why am I blogging about it too? Why now? Well, on Monday I attended the Australasian College for Infection Prevention and Control 2016 conference to chat about Twitter [link to that presentation here. Also, check-out the #ACIPC16 hashtag here and here]. Luckily I was there for the opening plenary sessions, and was pleasantly surprised at the emotional/psychological literacy that was being displayed and advocated for. The opening presentations by Peter Collignon, Mary Dixon Woods and Didier Pittet all went to some lengths to emphasise the importance of emotional intelligence, constructive communication and building relationships. It was really impressive stuff; giving the hand hygiene and mindful moments idea a remix is my way to give recognition/thanks to the #ACIPC16 conference delegates and organisers.

How to win friends and influence people: https://twitter.com/emrsa15/status/800495292642508801

How to win friends and influence people: https://twitter.com/emrsa15/status/800495292642508801

Just so you know, a quick google search reveals that others have also thought of using hand hygiene as a mindful moment, eg this paper:

Gilmartin, Heather. (2016) Use hand cleaning to prompt mindfulness in clinic: A regular prompt for reflection could reduce distraction. BMJ 2016; 352 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i13 (Published 04 January 2016)

and this video:

There are others too. Do you think using hand hygiene as a mindful moment could become mainstream?

5mindfulmoments

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That’s it. As always your comments are welcome via the space below.

May you hands be clean and your head be clear! 🙂 

Paul McNamara, 26 November 2016

Short URL: http://meta4RN.com/hygiene

Twitter is a Vector (my #ACIPC16 presentation)

This post is a companion piece to my oral presentation at the Australasian College for Infection Prevention and Control 5th International Conference, 20 -23 November 2016, Pullman & Mercure Melbourne Albert Park. The conference hashtag is #ACIPC16. The function of the online version is to be a collection point to list references/links.

prezi1The Prezi is intended as an oral presentation, so I do not intend to include a full description of the content here.

Regular visitors to meta4RN.com will recognise some familiar themes. Let’s not call it self-plagiarism (such an ugly term), I would rather think of it as a new, funky remix of a favourite old song. Due to this remixing of old content I’ve included lots of previous meta4RN.com blog posts on the reference list (which, in turn, makes the reference list look stupidly self-referential). Anyway, with that embarrassing disclosure, here is the abstract and list of references  for the Prezi https://prezi.com/fcjda3fh9etr/twitter-is-a-vector

Abstract

Using Twitter in your profession (aka Twitter is a Vector*)

Communication is an inherent part of being a health professional. Over time we have our adapted to the communication technologies available to us: telephones, fax machines, emails and videoconferencing. Yet, for some of us, there seems to be hesitation to use one of the technologies of our time – social media – in a similarly confident manner.

Perhaps you have heard a health professional say something like, “Twitter doesn’t interest me – I don’t care what Justin Bieber had for breakfast.” Those people speak that way because they don’t have a clear understanding of the difference between personal, official and professional use of Twitter.

This presentation is a blatant hard-sell regarding professional use of social media. Examples of professional use of Twitter being used to augment education, conferences, health promotion, academia and the profile of health professionals will be presented.

Please use the conference hashtag – #ACIPC16 – if live-Tweeting during this presentation.

prezi2References

#ACIPC16 hashtag data http://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ACIPC16

Australian College of Nursing (n.d.) Social media guidelines for nurses. Retreived from http://www.rcna.org.au/WCM/…for_nurses.pdf

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. (2014, March 17). Social media policy. Retrieved from http://www.ahpra.gov.au/News/2014-02-13-revised-guidelines-code-and-policy.aspx

Casella, E., Mills, J., & Usher, K. (2014). Social media and nursing practice: Changing the balance between the social and technical aspects of work. Collegian, 21(2), 121–126. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2014.03.005

Citizen Kane DVD cover. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.currentfilm.com/dvdreviews4/citizenkanedvd.html

Facebook. (2015). Facebook logo. Retrieved from https://www.facebookbrand.com/

Ferguson, C., Inglis, S. C., Newton, P. J., Cripps, P. J. S., Macdonald, P. S., & Davidson, P. M. (2014).  Social media: A tool to spread information: A case study analysis of Twitter conversation at the Cardiac Society of Australia & New Zealand 61st Annual Scientific Meeting 2013. Collegian, 21(2), 89–93. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2014.03.002

Fox, C.S., Bonaca, M.P., Ryan, J.J., Massaro, J.M., Barry, K. & Loscalzo, J. (2015). A randomized trial of social media from Circulation. Circulation. 131(1), pp 28-33

Gallagher, R., Psaroulis, T., Ferguson, C., Neubeck, L. & Gallagher, P. 2016, ‘Social media practices on Twitter: maximising the impact of cardiac associations’, British Journal of Cardiac Nursing, vol. 11, no. 10, pp. 481-487.

#IP2016 hashtag data: http://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/IP2016/analytics/?hashtag=IP2016&fdate=09%2F24%2F2016&shour=00&smin=00&tdate=10%2F01%2F2016&thour=00&tmin=00

Instagram. (2015). Instagram logo. Retrieved from https://help.instagram.com/304689166306603

Li, C. (2015). Charlene Li photo. Retrieved from http://www.charleneli.com/about-charlene/reviewer-resources/

lifeinthefastlane. (2013). #FOAMed logo. Retrieved from http://lifeinthefastlane.com/foam/

McNamara, P. (2016, October 21) Why on earth would a Mental Health Nurse bother with Twitter? (my #ACMHN2016 presentation). Retrieved from https://meta4RN.com/ACMHN2016

McNamara, P. (2016, October 15) Learn about Obesity (and Twitter) via Nurses Tweeting at a Conference. Retrieved from  https://meta4RN.com/obesity

McNamara, P., & Meijome, X. M. (2015). Twitter Para Enfermeras (Spanish/Español). Retrieved 11 March 2015, from http://www.ausmed.com.au/es/twitter-para-enfermeras/

McNamara, P. (2014). A Nurse’s Guide to Twitter. Retrieved from http://www.ausmed.com.au/twitter-for-nurses/

McNamara, P. (2014, May 3) Luddites I have known. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/luddites

McNamara, P. (2013) Behave online as you would in real life (letter to the editor), TQN: The Queensland Nurse, June 2013, Volume 32, Number 3, Page 4.

McNamara, P. (2013, October 25) Professional use of Twitter and healthcare social media. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/NPD100

McNamara, P. (2013, October 23) A Twitter workshop in tweets. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/tweets

McNamara, P. (2013, October 1) Professional use of Twitter. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/poster

McNamara, P. (2013, July 21) Follow Friday and other twitterisms. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/FF

McNamara, P. (2013, June 7) Omnipresent and always available: A mental health nurse on Twitter. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/twit

McNamara, P. (2013, January 20) Social media for nurses: my ten-step, slightly ranty, version. Retrieved from http://meta4RN.com/rant1

Moorley, C., & Chinn, T. (2014). Using social media for continuous professional development. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 71(4), 713–717. doi:10.1111/jan.12504

Nickson, C. P., & Cadogan, M. D. (2014). Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) for the emergency physician. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26(1), 76–83. doi:10.1111/1742-6723.12191

Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (2010, September 9) Information sheet on social media. Retrieved from http://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD10%2F3224&dbid=AP&chksum=qhog9%2FUCgKdssFmA0XnBlA%3D%3D

Screenshot 1 “Trump: Twitter helped me win but I’ll be ‘restrained’ now” from http://money.cnn.com/2016/11/12/media/donald-trump-twitter-60-minutes/

Screenshot 2: “Melania Trump rebukes her husband “all the time” for Twitter use” from http://www.cbsnews.com/news/donald-trump-melania-trump-60-minutes-interview-rebukes-twitter-use/

Tonia, T., Van Oyen, H., Berger, A., Schindler, C. & Künzli, N. (2016). International Journal of Public Health. 61(4), pp 513-520. doi:10.1007/s00038-016-0831-y

Twitter. (2015). Twitter logo. Retrieved from https://about.twitter.com/press/brand-assets

Wilson, R., Ranse, J., Cashin, A., & McNamara, P. (2014). Nurses and Twitter: The good, the bad, and the reluctant. Collegian, 21(2), 111–119. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2013.09.003

Wozniak, H., Uys, P., & Mahoney, M. J. (2012). Digital communication in a networked world. In J. Higgs, R. Ajjawi, L. McAllister, F. Trede, & S. Loftus (Eds.), Communication in the health sciences (3rd ed., pp. 150–162). South Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

End 

Finally, a big thank you to the  Australasian College for Infection Prevention and Control 2016 conference organisers for inviting me to #ACIPC16. Special thanks to the Chair of the Scientific Committee Brett Mitchell (aka @1healthau on Twitter).

prezi3That’s it. As always your comments are welcome.

Paul McNamara, 18th November 2016

Short URL: meta4RN.com/ACIPC16

Learn about Obesity (and Twitter) via Nurses Tweeting at a Conference

If you read this I guarantee that you will learn 4 things in 5 minutes:

  1. How obesity works
  2. How Twitter at a healthcare conference works
  3. How an aggregation tool like Storify can add value to Twitter content
  4. How nurses can be simultaneously generous, incisive and funny

 

Small sample of conference Tweets. Click to see the whole story

Small sample of conference Tweets. Click to see the whole story: https://storify.com/meta4RN/obesity-personal-or-social-responsibility

So What?

Sometimes I have trouble explaining to health professionals how Twitter works at conferences. It’s easier to show an example, rather than just chin-wagging and flapping-about like a chook in a cyclone. That’s why I have created this example: https://storify.com/meta4RN/obesity-personal-or-social-responsibility

Haven’t I Seen This Before?

Maybe. Back in 2013 this example was buried about halfway through a long blog post called #ICNAust2013: Looking Back at a Nursing Conference through a Social Media Lens, At time of writing this self plagiarising (yet again!) post, the original post has been read 578 times, and the Storify version has been viewed 595 times. You may be one of the lucky few to have seen it before. 🙂

Huh? I Don’t Get It.

Follow this link: https://storify.com/meta4RN/obesity-personal-or-social-responsibility, take 5 minutes to read through the collated Tweets, and then you’ll get it. Promise.

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As always, you’re very welcome to leave feedback/suggestions/questions in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 15 October 2016

Short URL: https://meta4RN.com/obesity