Tag Archives: FunFacts

20 Tweetable Fun Facts for 2020: Year of the Nurse #Nurses2020

1
World Health Organisation designated the year 2020 as the “Year of the Nurse and Midwife”, in honor of the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.who.int/hrh/news/2019/2020year-of-nurses/en/


2
Florence Nightingale was named after the city in which she was born (Florence, Italy). #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/timelines/z92hsbk

3
Amongst Florence Nightingale’s achievements was the introduction of female nurses into military hospitals. Yes: FEMALE nurses! 🙂 #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://florence-nightingale.co.uk/the-crimean-war/

4
Australia’s Nurses and Midwives are
🔴 88.8% Female
🔴 11.2% Male
🔴 <0.1% Intersex or Indeterminate
#Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD19%2f29215&dbid=AP&chksum=pxYq4Vv8xOa1OH59ah8pUw%3d%3d (Table 10.1)

5
The International Council of Nurses (@ICNurses) was born in 1899 on the busy intersection of woman’s rights, social progressivism and healthcare reform. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: http://icntimeline.org/page/0003.html

6
Before 2020 Year of the Nurse kicked-off there were already 3000 Tweets using the #Nurses2020 hashtag (sent from 1,800+ Twitter accounts) #Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/Nurses2020/analytics/?hashtag=Nurses2020&fdate=12%2F1%2F2019&shour=6&smin=0&tdate=12%2F30%2F2019&thour=6&tmin=0

7
56% of Australia’s registered health workforce are Nurses and/or Midwives. #Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.ahpra.gov.au/Publications/Annual-reports/Annual-Report-2019/Overview.aspx

8
In Australia there are:
🔴 371,902 Nurses without a Midwifery qualification
🔴 26,047 Nurses and Midwives (dual registration, that is)
🔴 5,583 Midwives without a Nursing qualification
#Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD19%2f29215&dbid=AP&chksum=pxYq4Vv8xOa1OH59ah8pUw%3d%3d (Table 2.1)

9
35.7% of Australia’s Nurses and Midwives are aged over 50 (not that there’s anything wrong with that) #Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD19%2f29215&dbid=AP&chksum=pxYq4Vv8xOa1OH59ah8pUw%3d%3d (Table 7.1)

10
Most of Australia’s 397,949 Nurses have a general qualification, but some do not. They have a sole qualification, ie:
🔴 2,243 in mental health nursing
🔴 579 in paediatric nursing
🔴 115 in disability nursing
#Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD19%2f29215&dbid=AP&chksum=pxYq4Vv8xOa1OH59ah8pUw%3d%3d (Tables 2.1 and 6.1)

11
1 in 30 people working in Australia is a Nurse and/or Midwife (ie: 3.33% of the Australian workforce are Nurses/Midwives) #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.ahpra.gov.au/Publications/Annual-reports/Annual-Report-2019/Overview.aspx

12
Top three places where Nurses and Midwives employed in Australia received their initial nursing and midwifery qualification:
1️⃣ Australia (79.6%)
2️⃣ England (4.7%)
3️⃣ India (2.8%)
#Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery-workforce-2015/contents/who-are-nurses-and-midwives

13
In per capita terms, remote Australia has a larger supply of Nurses and Midwives than Australia’s capital cities. #Nurses2020 #FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery-workforce-2015/contents/how-many-nurses-and-midwives-are-there (Figure 3)

14
Principal area of main job for Australian Nurses (top five):
1️⃣ Aged Care
2️⃣ Medical
3️⃣ Surgical
4️⃣ Peri-Operative
5️⃣ Mental Health
#Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/workforce/nursing-and-midwifery-workforce-2015/contents/work-characteristics-of-nurses-and-midwives (Figure 1)

15
Australia’s health professional registration agency (@AHPRA) does not recognise any Nursing Specialities, but recognises 23 Specialities in Medicine (and over 60 sub-specialities) 🙄#Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Sources: http://meta4RN.com/credhttp://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au + https://www.medicalboard.gov.au/registration/types/specialist-registration/medical-specialties-and-specialty-fields.aspx

16
There are over 22,000 nurses working in mental health settings in Australia, over 3,200 of them are @ACMHN members, 1235 of them are @ACMHN Credentialed. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Sources: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/mental-health-services/mental-health-services-in-australia/report-contents/mental-health-workforce/mental-health-nursing-workforce + http://www.acmhn.org/images/stories/News/AnnualReports/ACMHN_Annual_Report_2017_-_2018.pdf  + http://www.acmhn.org/images/stories/Resources/2019_Media_Kit.pdf 

17
Australians rated Nurses as the most ethical and honest profession each year for 21 years in a row (1994-2015). #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: http://www.roymorgan.com/findings/6188-roy-morgan-image-of-professions-2015-201504280343

18
There are over 60 separate Nursing Organisations in Australia #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Sources: http://meta4RN.com/colleges + http://www.conno.org.au/members + http://www.nurseinfo.com.au/links.html

19
Australian Nurses and Midwives have free access to ‪@NMSupportAU: a 24/7 national support service providing confidential advice and referral. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: https://www.nmsupport.org.au

20
Representing more than 275,000 members, the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (‪@anmf_federal ) is Australia’s largest national union. #Nurses2020 ‬#FunFacts #SupportNursesAndMidwives https://meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

Source: http://anmf.org.au/pages/about-the-anmf

End

Keen-eyed meta4RN readers will recognise some of this content from this 2015 post: https://meta4RN.com/FunFacts – this post isn’t self-plagiarism, it’s just a funky new remix of a favourite old song. 🙂

As always, your feedback is welcome in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 1 January 2020

Short URL: meta4RN.com/Nurses2020

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Zap!

Once upon a time a man was tasered by police. He found it invigorating and helpful.

Describing the event, he said words to the effect of, “I have never felt more alive!”. He explained that for the duration of event and for a fair while after experiencing the pain of a taser, he stopped thinking about the pains and concerns that usually preoccupy his thoughts and feelings. Because he found being tasered so helpful, he asked whether we – the mental health service – would administer ECT.

We thought he was joking.

He told us he wasn’t.

The conversation lead to me to do some… ahem… research* which yields this interesting comparative data:

Brief Elaboration + Data Sources

▶️ ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) delivers somewhere between 180 to 480 volts to the body [source]. ECT is only administered after the person has been given a short-acting general anaesthetic (eg: propofol) and muscle relaxant (eg: suxamethonium).

▶️ Although Taser generates up to 50,000 volts in an open air arc, it is thought to typically deliver approximately 1200 volts to the body [source]. People who are “treated” with Taser are not administered anaesthetic or muscle relaxants beforehand, However, it is thought that at least some of the people who are zapped with a Taser have been self-administering substances that may convey some anaesthetic and/or muscle relaxant properties.

▶️ AED (automated external defibrillator) delivers 3000 volts to the body in a short, sharp burst [source]. As with Tasers, those treated with AEDs are not usually administered anaesthetic medications or muscle relaxants beforehand.

So What?

What does this data tell us?

On one hand, not a hell of a lot. An AED discharges its high voltage very quickly (about a tenth of a second), whereas a Taser will stay active for anywhere between 5 and 30 seconds, depending on the model/voltage. Over a course of ECT treatment the comparatively low voltage dose will be usually repeated at least half-a-dozen times, sometimes twice that number. So, despite the discrepancies amongst the voltages delivered at the body, because of site, anaesthetic, duration and repeat-dose differences we’re not actually [cliché warning] comparing apples with apples.

What is interesting to note is that there’s not much contention about using electricity as medicine in an AED. In fact, there’s great support to have AEDs more readily available in shopping centres, on commercial planes and in airports, at sporting grounds etc. By comparison, there’s a whole lot of contention regarding the use/misuse of Tasers and ECT, despite them using much lower voltages than AED.

I don’t feel confident enough in the facts to wade into an argument about ECT, other than to note that I’ve met some people who tell me it’s the only thing that has stopped them from staying so profoundly depressed that they wished they were dead. Not everyone who has a been treated with ECT describes a positive experience, of course –  I believe them too.

What about the Taser bloke?

We let Taser-bloke down easily. It was good to be able to tell him about the differences in voltages. We explained that nobody administers ECT without anaesthetic anyway, so he would not get the distracting alternative pain that he was seeking. We thanked him for the interesting question. He seemed to be OK with our answer.

End Notes

By “research*”, in this instance I actually mean “googling for a couple of minutes”. The “…ahem…” prefix is the international signifier of this not-so-scholarly research approach. That is, for god’s sake, please don’t take this blog post too seriously. Store it in the #FunFacts/trivia/let’s-have-an-argument-for-the-fun-of-it part of your brain, not in the scholarly/clinical/sensible part of your brain.

As always, your feedback/thoughts are welcomed in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 28 February 2019

Short URL: meta4RN.com/zap

Graphic Text
I’m happy for this – or any of the above – to be cut and paste into your work, but please include the URL so people can read the explanatory notes; it’s a bit deceptive otherwise.

A comparison:
▶️ ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) 180 to 480 volts
▶️ Taser approx 1200 volts
▶️ AED (automated external defibrillator) 3000 volts
meta4RN.com/zap

Creative Commons License
Zap! by Paul McNamara is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at meta4RN.com/zap.