Tag Archives: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

Mental Health Nursing making an impact

Recently I trawled through the history of the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (IJMHN) – if you’re curious please see this editorial and this blog post.

Amongst the things revealed was the encouraging upward trend in the Impact Factor – a metric that reflects how many citations individual academic journals attract over a two year period. I was especially encouraged that a targeted social media strategy, together with the increased volume of articles, coincide with the Impact Factor upward trend since 2017.

Today this arrived in an email:

The 2022 Journal Citation Reports were released overnight, and I am very pleased to let you know that International Journal of Mental Health Nursing’s 2021 Impact Factor is 5.100 – a significant increase from 3.503 for 2020. This result places the Journal in the rankings: 2/125 (Nursing), 2/123 (Nursing (Social Science)), 57/155 (Psychiatry), 43/142 (Psychiatry (Social Science)).

Alison Bell, Journal Publishing Manager, Wiley, email of 29 June 2022

That is – to put it bluntly – bloody amazing!

Don’t believe me? Look at the chart below…

International Journal of Mental Health Nursing Impact Factor (2010 – 2021)

The journal had very humble beginnings. It was just an idea amongst a few Mental Health Nurses in Australia in July 1978. The first issue consisting of just two articles and editorial followed in September 1980 (source and source).

2021 data reveals this humble little journal is now ranked the second most impactful nursing journal on the planet.

Amazing.

Mental Health Nursing is punching above its weight. Mental Health Nursing ranks 5th as principal specialty, after Aged Care, Medical, Surgical and Peri-operative (source and source). Yet, we have a journal that rates 2nd most cited nursing journal, behind the International Journal of Nursing Studies (IJNS).

That’s something to celebrate – not just for the authors, reviewers and editors who put in the hard work to make it happen – but for all Mental Health Nurses.

End

Please spread word about the impact of the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing – it’s a good news story 🙂

Paul McNamara, 29 June 2022

Short URL meta4RN.com/impact

IJMHN LinkedIn post

IJMHN Facebook post

Happy Anniversary International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

Since late 2016 I have been the Social Media Editor for the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (IJMHN). If you’re interested in how that started, see meta4RN.com/IJMHN. The years that have followed have resulted in heaps of Tweets, Facebook posts and LinkedIn updates. As a byproduct, I’ve been keeping a closer eye on the journal than I would have otherwise, and stumbled across the fact that 2022 marks the anniversary of three important milestones in the journal’s history:

✅ 30 years as a fully refereed journal (1992)
✅ 20 years as the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2002)
✅ 10 years on social media (2012)

That observation has been explored and elaborated-on via my first (and probably only) editorial. Please read and share the article far and wide:

McNamara, P. (2022), Happy anniversary IJMHN. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Below are some abbreviated highlights and a video summary from the editorial.

What’s in a name?

1980 Journal of the Australian Congress of Mental Health Nurses
1990 Australian Journal of Mental Health Nursing
1994 Australian and New Zealand Journal of Mental Health Nursing
2002 International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

Figure 3. Evolution of the Journal (1980–2022). https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Editors

1980 Dennis Cowell
1982 Ron Dee
1986 Owen Sollis
1987 Linda Salomons
1988 Andrew King
1990 Michael Clinton
1999 Michael Hazelton
2004 Brenda Happell 
2015 Kim Usher

I have not attempted to discover the names of everyone who has served on the journal’s editorial board – there would many dozens (in the hundreds?) of people of who have contributed over the years. For what it’s worth, below is a May/June 2022 snapshot of the editorial board.

Online list: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/14470349/homepage/editorialboard.html

Beyond the Walled Gardens

It is sensible to promote the work of IJMHN authors/researchers beyond the walled gardens of mental health nursing and academia. Below are links to the journal’s first excursions from behind the paywalls and exclusion zones that prevent people seeing the work and research of mental health nurses, and out to ‘the village square’ that is social media:

Twitter 2012 bit.ly/IJMHNTwitter
Facebook 2013 bit.ly/IJMHNfacebook
LinkedIn 2021 bit.ly/IJMHNLinkedIn

As I’ve argued previously (here and here), there’s not much value in spending weeks/months/years doing research, then pushing through the tedium of academic writing, and finally jumping through the flaming hoops of peer review only for your work to sit around unread and gathering dust. Authors and the institutions that support them should promote the paper to its greatest readership. The IJMHN has a strategy to promote mental health nursing’s research and work on social media – do you?

Figure 4. Example of Altmetric Attention Score. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Average Number of IJMHN Articles

2000–2006 = 35 per year
2007–2017 = 62 per year
2018–2021 = 135 per year

Figure 1. Number of IJMHN Articles Published (2000=2021). https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Making an Impact

The first IJMHN Impact Factor was 1.427 (2010). At time of writing, the most recent available Impact Factor is 3.503 (2020). That’s pretty amazing – the IJMHN is the highest-ranked mental health/psychiatric nursing journal, and is rated as the 5th most cited nursing journal in the world (in a field of 124 nursing journals).

A targeted social media strategy together with the increased volume of articles coincide with the Impact Factor upward trend starting in 2017.

Time will need to pass before we know whether the most recently reported Impact Factor is an anomaly of the pandemic. I make this observation because, at time of writing, the three most cited IJMHN papers are all from 2020, and each of these highly-cited articles discuss contemporary-at-the-time COVID-19 issues (see the “Most Cited” tab here: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14470349).

Figure 2. IJMHN Impact Factor (2010–2020). https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Connecting with IJMHN

Website www.wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/INM
Twitter twitter.com/IJMHN
Facebook www.facebook.com/IJMHN
LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/company/IJMHN


TL;DR

too long; didn’t read?

Watch the video – it’s less than 2 minutes long, and has a cool musical accompaniment (‘Dashed Ambitions’ by Moby, kindly provided gratis via mobygratis.com).

(video made by first making a Prezi)

End Notes

In case you missed it above, here’s the citation and link to the editorial:

McNamara, P. (2022), Happy anniversary IJMHN. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

And the PDF version is here: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/inm.13025

Thanks for reading this far. I would be grateful if you share either this blog page or – preferably – the article itself. Sharing is caring 🙂

As always, feedback is welcome via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 29 May 2022

Short URL: meta4RN.com/happy

Share or Perish!


 

About a decade ago, the old academic refrain to ‘publish or perish’ was updated to ‘be cited or perish’. A couple of days ago we published a paper arguing for a new call-to-arms: ‘share or perish’.

The truth is not too many people are perishing in the academic space. However, there is a pretty good indication that publishing in a journal that has a social media strategy makes a difference.

Want evidence? Have a look at these excerpts from our paper that compares the 18 months before the appointment of a social media editor for the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (IJMHN) with the 18 months after that appointment.

First piece of evidence is in Figure 1 (below). Data from Twitonomy collated in 6‐monthly increments shows that after appointment of an IJMHN social media editor there was a 13½‐fold increase in tweets, and a 16‐fold increase in shared URLs.

Figure 1. Twitter Activity before and after the commencement of IJMHN social media editor on 01/01/17. Data from Twitonomy collated in 6‐monthly increments.

Figure 2 (below) plots 4 different data points. 

It shows that Impressions increased from an average of 118 per day to 2839 per day. That’s a 24-fold increase on how many Twitter accounts potentially saw an @IJMHN Tweet each day. 

Retweets increased from an average 62 retweets every 6 months to over 2140 retweets every 6 months. That’s a 35-fold increase in the number of time @IJMHN Tweets were shared – a remarkable increase in audience reach.

Similarly, the ‘likes’ that @IJMHN attracted increased from 45 times every 6 months to 2083 every 6 months. That’s a 46-fold increase in people acknowledging or showing approval to @IJMHN Tweets.

Most importantly, the number of times people clicked on the link (URL) of an IJMHN paper increased markedly too. It jumped from 129 to 2960 link clicks recorded every six months – a 23‐fold increase.

Figure 2. Twitter Impact before and after the commencement of IJMHN social media editor on 01/01/17. Data from Twitter Analytics collated in 6‐monthly increments.

The final data point I’ll present here is the Altmetric Attention Score (AAS), as shown in Figure 3 (below). The AAS increased from an average of 490 to 1317 every 6 months. This equates to an 169% increase in online attention and activity for IJMHN.

Figure 3. Altmetric Attention Score and Number of Articles published before and after the commencement of IJMHN social media editor on 01/01/17. Data from Altmetric collated in 6‐monthly increments.

Closing Remarks

This simplified summary of the paper misses some of the data and the description of context, the social media strategy and the reporting method. Please see the original paper for more info [link].

Want to find out more about how some of this stuff is measured? Start here: https://wiley.altmetric.com/details/62929297

Please share the link to this blog and/or to our paper about stage one of the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing social media strategy.

Don’t forget: Share or Perish! 

Citation 

McNamara, P. and Usher, K. (2019), Share or perish: Social media and the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, online from 30/06/19, volume and issue yet to be allocated [I’ll update this when it’s in an issue]
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12600
URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/inm.12600 

End

As always, feedback is welcomed via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 2 July 2019

Short URL: meta4RN.com/share