Tag Archives: nurses

Mental Health Nursing making an impact

Recently I trawled through the history of the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (IJMHN) – if you’re curious please see this editorial and this blog post.

Amongst the things revealed was the encouraging upward trend in the Impact Factor – a metric that reflects how many citations individual academic journals attract over a two year period. I was especially encouraged that a targeted social media strategy, together with the increased volume of articles, coincide with the Impact Factor upward trend since 2017.

Today this arrived in an email:

The 2022 Journal Citation Reports were released overnight, and I am very pleased to let you know that International Journal of Mental Health Nursing’s 2021 Impact Factor is 5.100 – a significant increase from 3.503 for 2020. This result places the Journal in the rankings: 2/125 (Nursing), 2/123 (Nursing (Social Science)), 57/155 (Psychiatry), 43/142 (Psychiatry (Social Science)).

Alison Bell, Journal Publishing Manager, Wiley, email of 29 June 2022

That is – to put it bluntly – bloody amazing!

Don’t believe me? Look at the chart below…

International Journal of Mental Health Nursing Impact Factor (2010 – 2021)

The journal had very humble beginnings. It was just an idea amongst a few Mental Health Nurses in Australia in July 1978. The first issue consisting of just two articles and editorial followed in September 1980 (source and source).

2021 data reveals this humble little journal is now ranked the second most impactful nursing journal on the planet.

Amazing.

Mental Health Nursing is punching above its weight. Mental Health Nursing ranks 5th as principal specialty, after Aged Care, Medical, Surgical and Peri-operative (source and source). Yet, we have a journal that rates 2nd most cited nursing journal, behind the International Journal of Nursing Studies (IJNS).

That’s something to celebrate – not just for the authors, reviewers and editors who put in the hard work to make it happen – but for all Mental Health Nurses.

End

Please spread word about the impact of the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing – it’s a good news story 🙂

Paul McNamara, 29 June 2022

Short URL meta4RN.com/impact

IJMHN LinkedIn post

IJMHN Facebook post

Nurses on the 2022 Queen’s Birthday Honours List

Extracting information from www.gg.gov.au below is a list/summary of the 13 Nurses named on the 2022 Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

Source: https://web.archive.org/web/2020*/https://www.itsanhonour.gov.au

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Paula Maree Duffy PSM
Public Service Medal (PSM)
Worongary, Queensland
For outstanding public service in nursing and the response to the COVID-19
pandemic.


Paula Duffy has worked for the Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service for 20 years and was promoted to the role of Executive Director of Nursing, Midwifery and Patient Experience, after formerly holding the position of Executive Director of Integrated Ambulatory and Community Services, incorporating one of the largest Emergency Departments in Australia.

Ms Duffy’s professional relationships and concentrated efforts across the organisation have been fundamental to the management of COVID-19 at Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service. Extremely well regarded by the leadership in the Queensland Ambulance and Police service, her strong leadership has been the glue that helped the Gold Coast navigate the challenges of being the first region to experience the Omicron variant peak in Queensland. She coordinated the hospital response which required the opening of 9 dedicated COVID-19 wards and 2 ICU pods.

Ms Duffy is a leader across all aspects of the COVID-19 response, ranging from the creation of testing centres in the community to facility screening desks, quarantine hotels, dedicated COVID-19 wards, virtual wards and partnering with private hospitals to increase public patient capacity. For the last two years she has been the key contact for the Gold Coast, reporting to the state bodies and coordinating complex arrangements across the city to support the COVID response.

The contribution by Paula Duffy to her profession, and the high regard in which she is held, is testament to her quality standards and consistent contribution to the public health sector over decades.

********************************************

Caroline Farmer PSM
Public Service Medal (PSM)
Padstow, New South Wales
For outstanding public service to New South Wales Health, particularly during the
COVID-19 pandemic.


Currently serving as the Director of Nursing & Midwifery and Clinical Governance within the Western Sydney Local Health District, Ms Caroline Farmer has made significant contributions to public health throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

In June 2020, Ms Farmer’s executive leadership was pivotal during Western Sydney Local Health District’s (WSLHD) initial COVID-19 response. She liaised with key staff from the Commonwealth, the New South Wales Ministry of Health and residential aged care facilities to ensure the availability of adequate nursing workforce to support local outbreak sites.

Ms Farmer also ensured the coordination of a nursing workforce to disability homes, local facilities, vaccinations centres and the Greater Western Sydney COVID-19 Community Accommodation. As a result of the continual demand for nursing staff, Ms Farmer established a District COVID-19 Nursing Workforce Unit which provided a centralised point for the coordination of nursing staff deployment across Western Sydney. Throughout this time, as the WSLHD Emergency Operations Centre’s executive lead for Planning, Ms Farmer was integral in the coordination and finalisation of a number of key initiatives, such as the WSLHD Intensive Care Workforce Plan, the COVID-19 Ward Model of Care and the WSLHD Clinical Governance Safety and Quality Priorities.

Ms Farmer continues to foster the next generation of leaders amongst nurses and midwives in WSLHD, ensuring this cohort have the right skill set, insight and vision to drive improvements in health care services and future innovations. In recognition of this priority, in February 2021, a pilot WSLHD Nursing & Midwifery Leadership Program was launched, with 12 participants from across the region selected for the opportunity to develop and grow on their leadership journey. Upon graduation, this cohort were empowered to enact upon their future leadership goals, influence positive change at a local level through shared learnings, actions and individual leadership practice, and effectively support service operations to deliver better care and services to patients across Western Sydney.

Ms Farmer is an exemplary public servant who is a role model for collaborative leadership and innovative contributions. She is a trusted voice within the public health community and shows unwavering commitment and resilience to deliver results.

********************************************

Wendy Leeanne Hellebrand OAM
Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in the General Division
Victoria
For service to the community through a range of roles.

Lions V Districts Cancer Foundation, Lions Australia

  • Skin Check and Dermoscopy Coordinator, Mobile Skin Check Project, since 2019.

District 201V2, Lions Australia

  • Chairman, Zone 3, since 2002.
  • Chairperson, Family Welfare and Children’s Mobility, current.
  • Past Region Chairperson.
  • Past Chairperson, Drug Awareness Program.
  • Past Chair, Independent Third Person Program.
  • Past Chairperson, Youth of the Year, Young People in Service and Youth Exchange Program.

Inverleigh Leigh Valley Lions Club

  • Past President.
  • Past Vice President.
  • Past Treasurer
  • Past Secretary.
  • Liaison Officer, Campaign Sight First Program, 2007-2008.
  • Community Health and Welfare Officer, since 1999.
  • Member, since 1995.

Community

  • Council Member, Royal Geelong Agricultural and Pastoral Society, since approx 2000.

Professional

  • Practice Nurse, Bannockburn Surgery, current.
  • Past Sexual Health Nurse and Counsellor, (then) Headspace Geelong.

Awards and Recognition include:

  • Rural Nurse Award, Rural Workforce Agency Victoria, 2015.
  • District Governor’s Star Award, District 201V2, Lions Australia, 2012.
  • Melvin Jones Fellow Award, Inverleigh Leigh Valley Lions Club.
  • Leo Tyquin Award, Victorian Lions Foundation, 2009.

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Jennifer Mary Jones OAM
Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in the General Division
New South Wales
For service to family and child health nursing.

Sydney Local Health District

  • Clinical Nurse Consultant, Child and Family Health Nursing Service (CFHN), and the Family Partnership Coordinator, since 2009.
  • Clinical Nurse Consultant within Community Health, since 1990.
  • Staff Member and Researcher, Sydney Institute of Women, Children and their Families, current.

Education

  • Honorary Associate, Community Health Nursing, Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Sydney, since 2015.
  • Honorary Affiliate, University of Technology Sydney, 2018, and Lecturer, 10 years.

Nursing – Other

  • Clinical Supervisor to CFHN and Midwives Far West Area Health Service, Royal Flying Doctor Service and Maari Ma Aboriginal Health Service, 2001-2006.
  • Worked within operating theatres and emergency department, Children’s Hospital Westmead, 1995-2005.
  • Registered Nurse, since 1976.

Displaced Persons

  • Child and Family Health Clinical Coordinator, Services for Displaced Persons from Kosovo and East Timor, Operation Safehaven, Australian Government, 1999-2000.
  • Nurse, Child and Family Health Clinic, Dili, 2000.
  • Research Project, Health Outcomes for Displaced Persons from East Timor, 2000.

Maternal, Child and Family Health Nurses’ Australia

  • Former New South Wales Vice-President, 10 years.
  • Long-term Member.
  • Chair, National Conference, Sydney, 2000.
  • Former Committee Member.

Community

  • Member and Volunteer Lifesaver, Manly Surf Life Saving Club, 15 years.
  • Supporter, Royal Agricultural Society of New South Wales, current.

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Therese Anne Lee OAM
Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in the General Division
Bongaree, Queensland
For service to nursing.

The College of Emergency Nursing Australasia

  • Committee Member, Queensland Branch, 15 years.
  • Former President, Queensland Branch.
  • Former National Committee Member.

Flight Nurses Australia

  • Founding Member, 1995-2002.
  • Committee Member, 1995-2002.

Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital

  • Nursing Director, Safety and Quality Unit, 2011-2019.
  • Assistant Nursing Director, 2010-2011.
  • Former Aeromedical and Road Retrieval Nurse.

Queensland Health

  • Manager, Metro South Area Health Service, 2008-2010.

Royal Australasian College of Surgeons

  • Coordinator, Early Management of Severe Trauma Course, since 2005.
  • Member, current.

Sunshine Coast Helicopter Rescue Service

  • Former Chief Flight Nurse, Nambour.

Awards and recognition include:

  • Humanitarian Overseas Medal, 2006.
  • Australia Day Achievement Medal, Banda Aceh, 2006.
  • Australia Day Achievement Medal, Medical Services Olympic Games, 2001.

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Victor Mannin McConvey OAM
Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in the General Division
Elwood, Victoria
For service to people with Parkinson’s, and to nursing.

International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

  • Chair, Global Task Force on Palliative Care, since 2016.
  • Chair, Health Care Professional Special Interest Group, since 2016.
  • Member, Education Committee, current.
  • Member, since 2009.

Parkinson’s Victoria

  • Clinical Nurse Consultant, since 2006.
  • Manager, State-wide Health Information and Education Team.

Australian College of Nursing

  • Inaugural Co-chair, Movement Disorder and Parkinson’s Nurses Faculty, 2011-2012.
  • Member, since 1997.

Health – Other

  • Member/Supporter, World Parkinson’s Coalition, current.
  • Member, Advanced Practice/Nurse Practitioner Network, International Council of Nursing.
  • Registered Nurse, since 1990.

Professional – Other

  • Appointed, first Parkinson’s Disease Nurse Specialist, Leeds, United Kingdom, 2005-2006.
  • Charge Nurse – Stroke Rehabilitation, Leeds Teaching Hospital, Leeds, United Kingdom, 2004-2005.
  • Nurse Unit Manager, Neurological Unit, Calvary Health Care, Bethlehem, Melbourne, 1997-2004.
  • Associate Unit Manager – Acute Medical/Cardiology, John Fawkner Hospital, 1996-1997.
  • Associate Unit Manager – Continuing Care Unit, Fairfield Hospital, 1995-1996.
  • Associate Charge Nurse, Alfred Health Care Group, 1994-1995.
  • Registered General Nurse, Worthing and District Hospital, West Sussex, United Kingdom, 1993-1994.
  • Registered General Nurse, Monash Medical Centre, 1991-1993.

Awards and recognition include:

  • June Allen Practice Enhancement Fellowship, Nurses Board of Victoria, 2008.
  • ANZAN Prize for Best Neurology Paper delivered at the ANNA Conference and Scientific Meeting, Australasian Neuroscience Nurses Association, 2007.

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Michele Rumsey AM
Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in the General Division
Sydney, New South Wales
For significant service to nursing, and to health care policy.

World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre, University of Technology Sydney

  • Director, since 2008.
  • Vice Chancellor’s University of Technology Sydney (UTS) GAP Summit for the Pacific and Small Island Nations Steering Committee, 2020-2022.
  • WHO South Pacific Regional expert Pacific working group on Basic Psychosocial Skills, 2020.
  • ACFID PNG Working Group.
  • ACFID Research Development and Impact.
  • WHO WPRO Regional expert consultation on the future of mental health in the Western Pacific, 2021.
  • Member, WHO Technical Expert Group Global Education Academy, 2021.
  • WHO HQ Steering Group for the Nursing and Midwifery Global Community of Practice (NMGCOP).
  • Founding Member of Advisory Board for UTS International Development research and Impact Network, since 2019.
  • Member, Steering Committee, State of World Nursing Report, 2020.
  • PNG National Steering Committee on strengthening health workforce.
  • Contributor, Health Workforce Strategic Plan – Kiribati, 2018.
  • Leader, Pacific Open Learning Health Net Review, 2017-2018.
  • Director, Maternal and Child Health Initiative Papua New Guinea, 2012-2016.
  • Regulation Advisor, Papua New Guinea, 2014.
  • Recipient, Human Rights Award – Social Inclusion, 2014.

Nursing – Other

  • Secretariat, South Pacific Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers Alliance Secretariat, since 2008.
  • Assistant Secretary-General, Global Network of World Health Organisation Collaborating Centres for Nursing and Midwifery, 2014-2018 and since 2022.

World Health Organisation Europe

  • WHO HQ Steering Group for the Nursing and Midwifery Global Community of Practice (NMGCOP), since 2021.
  • Manager, Australian component, Mobility of Health Professionals Report,2012.
  • Project Officer, 1994-1995.

General Nursing Administration, World Health Organisation

  • Director, Health Policy and Service Design Unit, Western Pacific Region, 2021.
  • Director, WPRO Adaptation and implementation of Basic Psychosocial Skills: A Guide for COVID-19 Responders in selected Pacific Island Countries, 2020-2022.
  • Director, nursing and midwifery education and regulation, Pacific Island countries, 2021- 2022.
  • Director, WHO and DFAT PNG Health Strengthening Education Program for Nursing and Community Health Workers, since 2021.
  • Director, DFAT Papua New Guinea (PNG) ANGAU Hospital redevelopment Project Maternal Health 2020-2022.
  • Director, Papua New Guinea Schools of Nursing Audit, AusAID, 2012.
  • Director, International Council of Nurses, 1997-2005.
  • Ethics Officer, United Kingdom Central Council for Nurses, Midwives and Health Visitors, 1994-1998.
  • Project Manager, Royal College of Nursing, 1991-1995.

********************************************

Mary (Maria) Said AM
Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in the General Division
Quakers Hill, New South Wales
For significant service to anaphylaxis treatment, education and prevention.

Allergy and Anaphylaxis Australia

  • Chief Executive Officer, Allergy and Anaphylaxis Australia, since 2012.
  • National President, FACTS/Anaphylaxis Australia, 1999-2012.

Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA)

  • Associate Member, current.
  • ASCIA Member, New South Wales Anaphylaxis Working Party, current.
  • Member, various committees including the Anaphylaxis Committee, Education Committee, Paediatric Committee and Insect Allergy Working Party, Drug Allergy Working Party, current.

European Academy of Clinical Immunology and Allergy Patient Organisation

  • Committee Member, current.
  • Co-Chair, Asian Pacific Alliance, current.
  • Member, International Life Sciences Institute food labelling/allergen thresholds working group.

Allergy Research

  • National Co-Chair, National Allergy Strategy, since 2014.
  • Australian Representative, Patient Organisations Committee, European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, current.
  • Adjunct Research Fellow, Health and Medical Sciences, Pharmacy, University of Western Australia, since 2019.
  • Involved with the formation of the Allergen Bureau.
  • Committee Member, Tick Induced Allergies Research and Awareness (TiARA), since 2013.

Publications and Education

  • Associate investigator in several research studies.
  • Co-Author, a range of publications in medical and food industry journals.
  • Chapter Contributor, Allergen Management in the Food Industry, and other food industry and medical publications.
  • Launched first Australian Food Allergy Week.

Early Career

  • Registered Nurse, Blacktown Hospital, 1982-1997.
  • Educator, Hawkesbury Agricultural College, 1985-1987.

Awards and recognition include:

  • Neighbour of the Year, Blacktown City, 2004.
  • Ministerial Community Service Award, 1999.

********************************************

Lesley Salem AM
Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in the General Division
Hamilton, New South Wales
For significant service to nursing, and to Indigenous health.

Nursing

  • Nurse Practitioner, Generalist and Chronic Disease, Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities, New South Wales and Queensland, since 2010.
  • Various nursing positions, Hunter New England Hospital and Health Service, 1985-2010.
  • Involved with the establishment of Gidgee Healing at Doomadgee.

Nursing – Other

  • Mentor and Teacher to Nurse Practitioner Candidates, current.
  • Guest Speaker, Donna Diers Oration, Australian Nurse Practitioner conference, 2021.
  • Keynote Speaker, Australian Primary Health Care Nurses Association (APNA), National Conference, 2018.
  • Guest Speaker, Federal Indigenous Women’s United Nations delegate, 2009.
  • Guest Speaker, Nephrology Nurse Practitioner Model of Care, WHO, Geneva, 2008.
  • Indigenous Resources Advisor, Kidney Health Australia, 2008.
  • Member, National Working Party for the development of Remote Area Renal Service Standards for Indigenous Australians.

Professional Associations

  • Member, New South Wales Nurses and Midwives’ Association, since 1990.
  • Member, Australian Primary Health Care Nurses Association, current.
  • Member, Australia and New Zealand Nephrologist Society (ANZSN), current.
  • Member, Australian College of Nurse Practitioners (ACNP), current.
  • Member, The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM), current.
  • Member, Wannaruah Lands Council, current.
  • Former Member, Advisory Group, Nurse Practitioner Accreditation Standards on behalf of Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC).

Committees

  • Member, Nurse Practitioner Advisory Committee, University of Newcastle, current.
  • Member, Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) Taskforce Review Nurse Practitioner Taskforce, 2019.
  • Represented CATSINam at the Rural Health Roundtable, 2015.
  • Scientific Program Member, National Medicines Symposium, 2010.
  • Advisor for development of Indigenous Resources, Kidney Health Australia, 2008.
  • Former Member, National Working Party for the development of Remote Area Renal Service Standards for Indigenous Australians.
  • Former Member, Nurse Practitioner Advisory Committee, University of Newcastle.
  • Federal Indigenous Women’s Delegate on the Diplomatic Party to the United Nations.

Community

  • Volunteer, Development of Bush Tucker Farm, Rutherford Technology High School, 2007.
  • Volunteer, Development and Delivery of Aboriginal Health Worker Chronic Kidney Disease Education, 2007.
  • Volunteer, Teaching and Mentoring advanced Nephrology Nurses in Clinical Assessment, 2005-2010.
  • Artist, since 1990.

Publications

  • Iconography and Symbolism of Eastern NSW Aboriginal Art, 2015.
  • Bush Tucker in Kidney Failure and Diabetes, 2006.
  • The Health Management Plan for End Stage Kidney Disease, 2006.

Awards and recognition include:

  • Australian Nurse Practitioner of the Year, 2015.
  • Reconciliation Aboriginal Acquisitive Artwork Prize, 2013.
  • NSW Aboriginal Health Award: Innovation in Chronic Care, 2008.
  • NSW Premier’s Award, Fairness and Opportunity Award – Gold Award ‘Safeguarding our Nations – an Aboriginal Screening project, 2007.
  • First Indigenous Nurse Practitioner, 2003.

********************************************

Shillar Sibanda OAM
Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in the General Division
Point Cook, Victoria
For service to the African community of Victoria.

Africa Day Australia

  • President, since 2018.
  • Founding Member, since 2012.

Community Roles – Other

  • Committee Member, African Music and Cultural Festival, since 2016.
  • Committee Member, African Australian Communities Leadership Forum, current.
  • Chairperson, Hand 2 Hand Sincedane Charity, current (helping to rebuild schools in Zimbabwe).
  • Founding Member, Commemorative Committee Melbourne, Nelson Mandela Day Australia, since 2013.
  • Supporter, Unite to Fight Cancer for Peter McCullum, Mother’s Day Classic for Breast Cancer, St Vincent’s Fun Run.

Zimbabwe Community in Australia, Victoria

  • President, 2013-2015.
  • Committee Member, Interim Board, 2020.
  • Committee Member, 2005-2013.
  • Co-Founder, Zimbabwe Community Language School, 2011.
  • Founding Member, 2005.

Professional Career

  • Clinical Coordinator, Forensicare, since 2018.
  • Forensic Psychiatric Nurse, St Vincent’s Hospital, 2009-2018.
  • Psychiatric Nurse, Royal Melbourne Hospital, 2007-2009.
  • Registered Nurse, since 2006.

Awards and recognition include:

  • Premier’s Volunteer Championship Award, 2018.
  • Chairman’s Award, Zimbabwe Achievers Awards Australia, 2018.
  • Multicultural Award for Excellence, Africa Day Australia, 2013.
  • Ambassador for Peace, Universal Peace Foundation, 2010.

********************************************

Vicki Anne Simpson PSM
Public Service Medal (PSM)
Coffs Harbour, New South Wales
For outstanding public service to the Mid North Coast Local Health District,
particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Mrs Vicki Simpson is currently serving as the Director of Nursing, Midwifery and Service
Reform, and as the Health Service Functional Area Coordinator in the Mid North Coast Local Health District.

Mrs Simpson’s professionalism, resilience and leadership has been influential in the Health District’s response to catastrophic bushfires, a once in a generation flood and the COVID-19 pandemic over the last three years.

In an unprecedented and evolving global pandemic, Mrs Simpson has been exceptional in her role as the Health Service Functional Area Coordinator. Developing and rapidly implementing strategies for her nursing staff to ensure a well-managed response to COVID-19, she also took on the responsibilities of coordinating logistics, equipment (including ventilators and personal protective equipment), testing, and emergency accommodation. Further, she led early morning planning meetings coordinated with the State Health Emergency Operations Centre and liaised closely with community partners such as aged care facilities and local councils to ensure a coordinated COVID-19 response.

Mrs Simpson also spearheaded the mass vaccination program for the Health District,
resulting in more than 95 percent of the eligible local population reaching double vaccination status.

Mrs Simpson is committed to providing opportunities for First Nations people to embark on careers in nursing and midwifery. She has mentored staff through the trainee and cadetship process to senior nursing and midwifery roles, something she is most proud of.

With over 30 years of public service, Mrs Simpson is an integral part of the Mid North Coast Local Health District. She is an energetic, compassionate, and inspiring leader who is enormously respected among her peers and patients for her exemplary standard of professionalism and service delivery.

********************************************

Kathleen Mary Sloane AM
Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in the General Division
Richmond, Victoria
For significant service to nursing, and to global women’s health.

International Continence Society

  • Member, Developing World Committee, 2017-2020.
  • Member, current.

Continence Foundation of Australia

  • Member, Scientific Committee, NCOI Conference, Melbourne, 2022.
  • Member, current.

Uro-gynaecology
Presenter/Clinician, Uro-gynaecology workshops in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, including:

  • Myanmar, 2017, 2018 and 2019.
  • Cambodia, 2019.
  • Bangladesh, 2003, 2004 and 2018.
  • Ghana, 2014.
  • Ethiopia, 2009.
  • Fiji, 2005.

Victoria/Tasmania Branch, Continence Nurses Society Australia

  • President, 2010-2011.
  • Committee Member, 2002-2005 and 2007-2011.
  • Former Clinical Preceptor, Pelvic Floor Workshops.
  • Member, current.

St Vincent’s Health, Melbourne

  • Team Leader and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Continence Clinic, St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne, since 2008.

Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne

  • Clinic Coordinator and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Uro-gynaecology, 2002-2008.
  • Continence Nurse Advisor, 2001-2002.
  • Midwife and Clinical Nurse Specialist, 1990-1999.

Nursing – Other

  • Continence Nurse Advisor, National Continence Helpline, 1999-2002.
  • Former Critical Care Nurse, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne.
  • Registered General Nurse, since 1983.
  • Registered Midwife, since 1990.
  • Member, Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation.
  • Member, Continence Nurses Society Australia.

Awards and recognition include:

  • Connie Award, Continence Care Champion, 2013.
  • Jean Smith Prize, for Excellence in Women’s Health Nursing, Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, 2007.

********************************************

Karolyn Vaughan OAM
Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in the General Division
Queensland
For service to nursing.

International Board Certified Lactation Consultant Examiners

  • Director, Asia Pacific and the Africa Region, since 2006.
  • International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, since 1992.

Nursing

  • Clinical Nurse Consultant, Child and Family Health, Wentworth Area Health Service, 1997-2006.
  • Clinical Nurse Consultant, Karitane, mid 1990s.
  • Community Nurse and Early Childhood Nurse, Western Suburbs of Sydney, 1990s.
  • Registered Midwife, since 1989.
  • Registered Nurse, since 1986.

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TL;DR?

Too long; didn’t read?

Tweet the list of 13 Nurses named on the 2022 Queen’s Birthday Honours List instead. 🙂

Paula Duffy PSM, Caroline Farmer PSM, Wendy Hellebrand OAM, Jennifer Jones OAM, Therese Lee OAM, Victor McConvey OAM, Michele Rumsey AM, Mary (Maria) Said AM, Lesley Salem AM, Shillar Sibanda OAM, Vicki Simpson PSM, Kathleen Sloane AM. Karolyn Vaughan OAM

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End Notes

Methodology

  1. Using the contraction “nurs”, search each of the PDFs here:
    www.gg.gov.au/queens-birthday-2022-honours-list
  2. Weed out those who work in plant nurseries 🙂
  3. Check ambiguities here: www.ahpra.gov.au
  4. Drop all titles and arrange alphabetically
  5. Repeat annually

Who Will Collate Next Year’s List?

This will be the last year for the meta4RN blog/collating these lists (see “Beginning of the End“). Why don’t you take over the job next year on a blog/site of your own? As per the methodology above, it’s a pretty easy way to attract a couple of thousand hits in about 48 hours. More importantly, you will help spotlight achievements of nurses without resorting to those cringeworthy hero tropes (see “Batman is a hero. I am a health professional.“).

Missing Anyone?

Please let me know via the comments section below if I missed any Nurses on the 2022 Queen’s Birthday Honours List. Naturally, I’m happy to correct any oversights.

Queen’s Birthday? WTF?

What the hell is Australia doing celebrating our best and brightest by linking them to the not-actual-birthday of an unelected foreign multi-millionaire? It makes no sense. We should get behind the Australian Republic Movement, get the Union Jack off our flag, and get the Queens’s head (soon to be Charles’ head) off our coins. Australia has a history that is much, much longer than the British royal family’s history. See: republic.org.au

When Australia becomes a republic we should get a new flag. One that repels racists/extremists.
For more info about this John Joseph Australia flag painting see: https://theconversation.com/a-proposed-new-flag-that-everyones-talking-about-but-what-do-aboriginal-people-think-about-it-53959
(although I – a whitefella –  love the look/vibe of this alternative flag, it’s problematic)

Paul McNamara, 13 June 2022

Short URL: meta4RN.com/Queen22

Happy Anniversary International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

Since late 2016 I have been the Social Media Editor for the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (IJMHN). If you’re interested in how that started, see meta4RN.com/IJMHN. The years that have followed have resulted in heaps of Tweets, Facebook posts and LinkedIn updates. As a byproduct, I’ve been keeping a closer eye on the journal than I would have otherwise, and stumbled across the fact that 2022 marks the anniversary of three important milestones in the journal’s history:

✅ 30 years as a fully refereed journal (1992)
✅ 20 years as the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2002)
✅ 10 years on social media (2012)

That observation has been explored and elaborated-on via my first (and probably only) editorial. Please read and share the article far and wide:

McNamara, P. (2022), Happy anniversary IJMHN. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Below are some abbreviated highlights and a video summary from the editorial.

What’s in a name?

1980 Journal of the Australian Congress of Mental Health Nurses
1990 Australian Journal of Mental Health Nursing
1994 Australian and New Zealand Journal of Mental Health Nursing
2002 International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

Figure 3. Evolution of the Journal (1980–2022). https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Editors

1980 Dennis Cowell
1982 Ron Dee
1986 Owen Sollis
1987 Linda Salomons
1988 Andrew King
1990 Michael Clinton
1999 Michael Hazelton
2004 Brenda Happell 
2015 Kim Usher

I have not attempted to discover the names of everyone who has served on the journal’s editorial board – there would many dozens (in the hundreds?) of people of who have contributed over the years. For what it’s worth, below is a May/June 2022 snapshot of the editorial board.

Online list: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/14470349/homepage/editorialboard.html

Beyond the Walled Gardens

It is sensible to promote the work of IJMHN authors/researchers beyond the walled gardens of mental health nursing and academia. Below are links to the journal’s first excursions from behind the paywalls and exclusion zones that prevent people seeing the work and research of mental health nurses, and out to ‘the village square’ that is social media:

Twitter 2012 bit.ly/IJMHNTwitter
Facebook 2013 bit.ly/IJMHNfacebook
LinkedIn 2021 bit.ly/IJMHNLinkedIn

As I’ve argued previously (here and here), there’s not much value in spending weeks/months/years doing research, then pushing through the tedium of academic writing, and finally jumping through the flaming hoops of peer review only for your work to sit around unread and gathering dust. Authors and the institutions that support them should promote the paper to its greatest readership. The IJMHN has a strategy to promote mental health nursing’s research and work on social media – do you?

Figure 4. Example of Altmetric Attention Score. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Average Number of IJMHN Articles

2000–2006 = 35 per year
2007–2017 = 62 per year
2018–2021 = 135 per year

Figure 1. Number of IJMHN Articles Published (2000=2021). https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Making an Impact

The first IJMHN Impact Factor was 1.427 (2010). At time of writing, the most recent available Impact Factor is 3.503 (2020). That’s pretty amazing – the IJMHN is the highest-ranked mental health/psychiatric nursing journal, and is rated as the 5th most cited nursing journal in the world (in a field of 124 nursing journals).

A targeted social media strategy together with the increased volume of articles coincide with the Impact Factor upward trend starting in 2017.

Time will need to pass before we know whether the most recently reported Impact Factor is an anomaly of the pandemic. I make this observation because, at time of writing, the three most cited IJMHN papers are all from 2020, and each of these highly-cited articles discuss contemporary-at-the-time COVID-19 issues (see the “Most Cited” tab here: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14470349).

Figure 2. IJMHN Impact Factor (2010–2020). https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

Connecting with IJMHN

Website www.wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/INM
Twitter twitter.com/IJMHN
Facebook www.facebook.com/IJMHN
LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/company/IJMHN


TL;DR

too long; didn’t read?

Watch the video – it’s less than 2 minutes long, and has a cool musical accompaniment (‘Dashed Ambitions’ by Moby, kindly provided gratis via mobygratis.com).

(video made by first making a Prezi)

End Notes

In case you missed it above, here’s the citation and link to the editorial:

McNamara, P. (2022), Happy anniversary IJMHN. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.13025

And the PDF version is here: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/inm.13025

Thanks for reading this far. I would be grateful if you share either this blog page or – preferably – the article itself. Sharing is caring 🙂

As always, feedback is welcome via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 29 May 2022

Short URL: meta4RN.com/happy

Why choose Mental Health Nursing?

This blog post accompanies a chat with 3rd / 4th year James Cook University (JCU) Nurse/Midwife students at an industry presentation day on 12th May 2022. Here is a copy of the slide show I’ll be using for the presentation @ JCU on the day:

Below are snippets and elaborations of the info we will touch-on/discuss on the day. Parking the information online just in case any of the JCU Students want to come back to it, and/or if it happens to be of interest to others.

Slide 1
As part of introducing myself, I’ll also introduce the idea/example of nurses intentionally making themselves visible on social media (eg: linktr.ee/meta4RN). More about that sort of thing here and here.

Slide 2
The day of the JCU student nurse industry presentation = 12th May = Florence Nightingale’s birthday = International Nurses Day.
Coincidence?
Yeah, probably.
But anyway, here’s a link to 20 tweetable fun facts that I like to trot-out to celebrate International Nurses Day: meta4RN.com/nurses2020
Also, check out the #IND2022 hashtag on social media.

Slide 3
Mental Health Nursing is vastly different to other hospital-based specialist nursing roles. I reckon it’s a very good fit for people who are very adaptable. A few years ago Australian researchers coined the ‘Ten P’s of the professional profile that is mental health nursing’:

present
personal
participant partnering
professional
phenomenological
pragmatic
power-sharing
psycho-therapeutic
proud
profound

(Santangelo, Procter & Fassett, 2018)

Slides 4 & 5
Part of what makes Mental Health Nursing different is the structure of public mental health services. Inpatient care is just a small part of the service structure, and there is a lot of emphasis on outpatient/community based services. There are options to specialise (as I have done, more about that here and here), or – as Mental Health Nurses who work in rural and remote areas do – do a little bit of nearly everything on the list of services of slide 5/in the table below.

Intake PointsInpatient/Residential ServicesOutpatient/Community Services
Central Intake Service
Emergency Department
Consultation Liaison Psychiatry Service
Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit
Mental Health Unit
Step-Up/Step-Down Unit
Community Care Unit
Acute Care Team
Continuing Care Teams
Mobile Intensive Treatment Team
Older Persons Mental Health Service
Child & Youth Mental Health Service
Evolve Therapeutic Services
Perinatal & Infant Mental Health
NQ Eating Disorder Service
Forensic & Prison Mental Health
Alcohol Tobacco & Other Drugs
Rural Mental Health
Remote Mental Health
Examples of mental health services/settings

Slide 6
On any given day, less that 1% of people who are open the Mental Health/Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drugs Service that I work for are receiving specialist psychiatric inpatient treatment. The vast majority of mental health and addiction support and recovery happens in community settings, as evidenced by the data (collected on 12/04/22) below:

Cairns Hospital PICU/MHU Beds, n = 48
Cairns & Hinterland MHATODS Case Load, n = 5531

Slide 7
What do Mental Health Nurses do? Well, it’s pretty varied, but includes:

  • Responding to trauma/people experiencing crisis
  • Assessment – this mostly consists of looking, listening and asking – not necessarily in that order.
  • Coordinating and collaborating with the person and their family to plan and deliver care
  • Liaising with other members of the clinical team and other local services (eg: @CairnsHelp) to ensure holistic, person-centred care
  • Providing support
  • Act as an educator/resource person
  • Provide therapy (eg: Solution-Focused Therapy, Acceptance & Commitment Therapy)
  • Work across clinical and community settings
  • Work anywhere – including rural and remote areas (see: The challenges of mental health nursing in rural Australia)
  • Provide holistic care (ie: specialising as a Mental Health Nurse doesn’t suddenly mean you forget everything you’ve learned as student nurse/RN)
  • Being consumer-focused and trauma-informed
  • Acquiring and using specialised skills and knowledge

More info @ ACMHN.org/what-mental-health-nurses-do

Slide 8
As articulated by Hildegard Peplau (one of the earliest rockstars of Mental Health Nursing) our speciality places a premium on therapeutic use of self, and the therapeutic relationship.

Slide 9
Mental Health Nurse core competencies include:

  • assessment and management of risk
  • understanding recovery principles
  • person- and family-centred care
  • good communication skills
  • knowledge about mental disorders and treatment
  • evaluating research and promoting physical health
  • a sense of humour
  • physical and psychological interventions

(Moyo, Jones & Gray, 2022)

Slide 10
A specialist Mental Health Nurse is a…

  • psychotherapist
  • consumer advocate
  • physical health therapist
  • psycho-pharmacological therapist
  • relationship-focused therapist
  • aggression management therapist

 (Hurley & Lakeman, 2021)

Slide 11
Steps to becoming a Credentialed Mental Health Nurse:

  1. Graduate with an undergraduate degree in Nursing
  2. Complete a Graduate Diploma, Postgraduate Diploma or Masters in Mental Health Nursing
  3. (Optional) Undertake additional training in specific psychological therapies
  4. Successfully apply to be credentialed by the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses –  the peak professional mental health nursing organisation and the recognised credentialing body for Australia’s mental health nurses.

Slide 12
That’s it. Questions? 🙂

Video

Key References/Further Reading

Australian College of Mental Health Nursing acmhn.org

Hurley, J. & Lakeman, R. (2021), Making the case for clinical mental health nurses to break their silence on the healing they create: A critical discussion. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi.org/10.1111/inm.12836

Isobel, S., Wilson, A., Gill, K., Schelling, K. & Howe, D. (2021), What is needed for Trauma Informed Mental Health Services in Australia? Perspectives of clinicians and managers. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi.org/10.1111/inm.12811

McKenna Lawson, S. (2022), How we say what we do and why it is important: An idiosyncratic analysis of mental health nursing identity on social media. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi.org/10.1111/inm.12991

Moyo, N., Jones, M. & Gray, R. (2022), What are the core competencies of a mental health nurse? A concept mapping study involving five stakeholder groups. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi.org/10.1111/inm.13003

Santangelo, P., Procter, N. and Fassett, D. (2018), Mental health nursing: Daring to be different, special and leading recovery-focused care?. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi.org/10.1111/inm.12316

End

As always, feedback is welcome via the comments section below.

Naturally, if you think it will be of interest to any nurse/nearly-nurse you know, you are very welcome to forward the info on by whatever means you see fit. 🙂

Paul McNamara, 15th April 2022

Short URL meta4RN.com/JCU

don’t be that guy

If you haven’t seen these three things happen yet, you probably will soon now that you’re on watch for them:
– diagnostic overshadowing
– documentation resulting in a cascade of bias
– empathy failure

Together with Rebecca Callahan, I’ve written about diagnostic overshadowing before [here]. Diagnostic overshadowing is where current physical problems, symptoms or pathology gets overlooked, dismissed or downplayed because of the distraction of a documented history of a previous problem, eg: drug and/or alcohol use, mental health problems, or intellectual disability.

I was reminded of this when reading this excerpt from a recent article by Searby, Burr, James & Maude (2022):

I have a client who comes and sees me who has cirrhosis. I requested him to go and see a doctor at the local ED Department. ED don’t see him because they view him as just that junkie, just that drunk. This gentleman then has an acute exacerbation of his physical health, but it’s not seen as important…

Sound familiar? It’s not just in ED, it’s in other parts of the health system too.

Today I stumbled across a phrase I haven’t heard/read before: “a cascade of bias” (Martin, Bickle & Lok, 2022). The phrase “a cascade of bias” is in a report on a quantitative, observational study that compared the behaviour of nurses when they were exposed to either neutral or biased patient documentation. It’s embarrassing to me (a nurse) that the study found that biased language in documentation influenced how (un)helpful nurses were, and affected other aspects of clinical judgement and decision-making.

That’s a grim finding, isn’t it? It’s not just the unconscious cognitive bias of diagnostic overshadowing we have to watch out for. We have to watch out for letting that unconscious bias infiltrate our language in handover/documentation, so that we don’t inadvertently adversely affect the work of our colleagues too.

It’s easy to imagine diagnostic overshadowing (as per the excerpt above) leading to biased documentation, leading to a cascade of bias, resulting in empathy failure and poor outcomes for the patient.

That’s what my version of the distracted boyfriend meme is about.

It’s easy to be distracted from current problems, symptoms or pathology by biased documentation or past history.

Easy, but not cool.

Don’t be that guy.

References

Martin, K., Bickle, K. & Lok, J. (2022), Investigating the impact of cognitive bias in nursing documentation on decision-making and judgement. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi.org/10.1111/inm.12997

Searby, A., Burr, D., James, R. & Maude, P. (2022), Service integration: The perspective of Australian alcohol and other drug (AOD) nurses. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi.org/10.1111/inm.12998

End

That’s it. As always, please feel free to leave feedback via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 31 March 2022

Short URL: meta4RN.com/guy

Self Compassion: surviving and thriving in emotionally taxing work environments

Part 1: Introduction

Self Compassion is defined as “…being empathetic and understanding towards oneself, as you might to a close friend in times of suffering” (Aggar et al, 2022).

I’m using self compassion as a nuanced but important update to previous presentations and blog posts on the theme of self care. Why? Because self-compassion is a better fit for nurses, I reckon.  As Mills, Wand & Fraser (2015) say, “…it could be argued that nursing care is synonymous with compassion.” That’s most-often compassion for others, not always each-other or our selves. 🙄

The way I see it, self care is about the tasks and strategies we use to avoid burnout. Self compassion is more of an attitude or mindset that goes beyond burnout prevention, and shifts towards making sure that we are as kind and nurturing to ourselves as we’re expected to be to our patients.

In this iteration of an annually updated presentation aimed mostly, but not exclusively, at new Graduate Registered Nurses I want to put emphasis on self compassion as a valid and sensible priority. We don’t want new grads to just survive their first year, we want them to learn, enjoy their work, and grow.

Part 2: Prezi

It’s handy to have a way where you can quickly and easily find and share presentations. PowerPoint presentations are so last century. The face-to-face presentation uses this Prezi: prezi.com/view/wsTTDmVzAJOSRpqDXs2I/

Click here for the Prezi to open.

Part 3: References & Further Reading

This must be the 6th or 7th iteration of a theme I’ve been banging-on about for over a decade, so I’m recycling and repurposing a lot of old ideas here. Because of that iterative process the list below is ridiculously and embarrassingly self-referential.
Please don’t think of it as self-plagiarism.
Think of it as a fresh new remix of a favourite old song. 🙂

Aggar, C., Samios, C., Penman, O., Whiteing, N., Massey, D., Rafferty, R., Bowen, K. & Stephens, A. (2022), The impact of COVID-19 pandemic-related stress experienced by Australian nurses. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 31(1). https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12938

Australian College of Mental Health Nurses [www.acmhn.org], Australian College of Nursing [www.acn.edu.au], and Australian College of Midwives [www.midwives.org.au] (2019) Joint Position Statement: Clinical Supervision for Nurses + Midwives. Released online April 2019, PDF available via each organisation’s website, and here: ClinicalSupervisionJointPositionStatement

Chen, R., Sun, C., Chen, J.‐J., Jen, H.‐J., Kang, X.L., Kao, C.‐C. & Chou, K.‐R. (2020), A Large‐Scale Survey on Trauma, Burnout, and Posttraumatic Growth among Nurses during the COVID‐19 Pandemic. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi.org/10.1111/inm.12796

Clean Hands. Clear Head. meta4RN.com/head

Clinical Supervision Starter Kit meta4RN.com/sup

Eales, Sandra. (2018). A focus on psychological safety helps teams thrive. InScope, No. 08., Summer 2018 edition, published by Queensland Nurses and Midwives Union on 13/12/18, pages 58-59. Eales2018

Emotional Aftershocks (the story of Fire Extinguisher Guy & Nursing Ring Theory) meta4RN.com/aftershocks

Employee Assistance Service
via QHEPS: https://qheps.health.qld.gov.au/cairns/business-services/people-and-engagement/safety-wellbeing-and-support/getting-help-and-support

Employee Assistance Service
via Benestar (the company that CHHHS contracts out to) benestar.com

Football, Nursing and Clinical Supervision (re validating protected time for reflection and skill rehearsal) meta4RN.com/footy

Hand Hygiene and Mindful Moments (re insitu self-care strategies) meta4RN.com/hygiene

Lai. J, Ma. S, Wang. Y, et al. (23 March 2020) Factors Associated With Mental Health Outcomes Among Health Care Workers Exposed to Coronavirus Disease 2019. JAMA Network Open.
jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2763229

Lalochezia (getting sweary doesn’t necessarily mean getting abusive)  meta4RN.com/lalochezia

Miller, Ian. (circa 2013) Nursing ring theory: Care goes in. Crap goes out. impactEDnurse [blog]. Archived blog post accessed via Wayback Machine: web.archive.org/www.impactednurse.com/?p=5755

Mills, J., Wand, T. & Fraser, J. (2015) On self-compassion and self-care in nursing: selfish or essential for compassionate care? International Journal of Nursing Studies. 52(4).
doi: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.10.009.

Nurse & Midwife Support nmsupport.org.au  phone 1800 667 877
targeted 24/7 confidential support available for nurse, midwives, AINs and students

Nurses, Midwives, Medical Practitioners, Suicide and Stigma (re the alarming toll of those who undertake emotional labour) meta4RN.com/stigma

Nurturing the Nurturers (the Pit Head Baths and clinical supervision stories)  meta4RN.com/nurturers

Queensland Health. (2009). Clinical Supervision Guidelines for Mental Health Services. PDF

Queensland Health (March 2021) Clinical Supervision Framework for Queensland Nurses and Midwives
QHEPS: https://qheps.health.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0035/2658734/clinical-supervision-framework.pdf
PDF below:

Q: RUOK? A: Not really. I’m a nurse. meta4RN.com/RUOK

Self Care: Surviving emotionally taxing work environments meta4RN.com/selfcare

Self Compassion and Post Traumatic Growth amongst Nurses in the Pandemic (Hooray for Grey Hairs!) meta4RN.com/grey

Spector, P., Zhiqing, Z. & Che, X. (2014) Nurse exposure to physical and nonphysical violence, bullying, and sexual harassment: A quantitative review. International Journal of Nursing Studies. Vol 50(1), pp 72-84. www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020748913000357

Surfing the Omicron Wave (Cairns Hospital COVID-19 admission data, 14th December 2021 – 20th February 2022)  meta4RN.com/surfing

That was bloody stressful! What’s next?
Web: meta4RN.com/bloody
QHEPS: Search for “bloody stressful” on QHEPS, or try this link: https://qheps.health.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0034/2757544/bloody-stressful-staff-brochure.pdf
PDF below:

Zero Tolerance for Zero Tolerance (a reframing of reducing aggression) meta4RN.com/zero

Part 4: Video Presentation

At time of writing it looks like we are going to have another uptick in COVID-19 presentations (see above). Bugger. I won’t pretend to know how that will affect our local hospital and/or face-to-face and group learning. It will be handy to have a YouTube version of the otherwise interactive face-to-face presentation on hand just in case we revert to crisis-response mode like we did in January/February 2022 [more info about that here and here].

Part 5: End Notes

Thanks for visiting.

As always, feedback is welcomed via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 26 March 2022

Short URL meta4RN.com/grow

Surfing the Omicron Wave

There isn’t much in the way of surf in Cairns because the Great Barrier Reef is – ahem – a great barrier. Nevertheless, this year heaps of people who live and work in Cairns showed how skilled they are at big-wave-surfing.  

The Queensland borders did not open until Monday 13 December 2021. This allowed every adult who wanted to get vaccinated the opportunity to do so. Comparing what happened locally to what’s happened elsewhere around the world, it’s clear that having more than 90% of the adult population with some vaccination coverage before opening the borders made a huge difference to how high and long the Cairns omicron wave has been.  

In Cairns our COVID-19 omicron wave started slowly. There was just a trickle of COVID-19 positive people who required hospitalisation either side of Christmas 2021. From early in the New Year the omicron wave behaved more like a tsunami. The wave came in much faster and was much larger than most of us had anticipated. It was pretty scary. Two thirds of the way through January some of us were worried about drowning. At that stage we had three wards 100% dedicated to caring for COVID positive patients, plus a smattering of positive people in other wards and in ICU.

Much to our relief the wave crested and crashed nearly as quickly as it arrived. At the end of the first week of February we still had three COVID-dedicated wards, but they weren’t quite as full or as intense as the week before. A week later we were down to one ward 100% dedicated to COVID. A week after that we had zero wards 100% dedicated to COVID; positive patients were being nursed in negative-pressure rooms as per pre-pandemic practice. Amazing.

In Queensland, especially in Cairns, we know we’ve been very fortunate compared to many people and places in the world, but that doesn’t diminish the admiration I have for all the big-wave-surfers at work. Don’t forget, as argued previously [here] , they are NOT heroes – they are health professionals. Heroes tend to be blokes who are big, boofy and fictional. People in the hospital working with COVID patients are mostly women who are not-big, not-boofy and they are real lanyard-and-PPE-wearing nurses, ward clerks, cleaners, wardies, physios, doctors, specchies, OTs, security and catering peeps.

Despite the lack of practice we have with waves in Cairns there are heaps of really good big-wave-surfers here. This is evidenced by how gracefully and expertly they surfed the omicron wave. 🏄‍♀️

Not All Good News

It would be disrespectful not to acknowledge that it’s not an entirely good news story. The wave has diminished in size and strength, but has not disappeared yet. Also, some of the people who were hospitalised with COVID during this period have a very slow, difficult pathway towards recovery. Poignantly, twenty seven local people did not survive COVID during this period. Their families and friends are in our thoughts.  

End Notes

Data Sources: The hospital/ICU numbers were released every few days via internal “Team Brief” emails and/or via social media – these were the sources of the data used to create the chart above.

Thanks for reading. If you know someone who has surfed that omicron wave I’d be grateful if you make sure they get to see their portrait above. 🙂 🏄‍♀️

As always, feedback is welcome in the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 22 February 2022

Short URL: meta4RN.com/surfing

Nurses on the 2022 Australia Day Honours List

Extracting information from www.gg.gov.au/australia-day-2022-honours-list, below is an alphabetical list of Nurses, past and present, who have been named on the 2022 Australia Day Honours List.

Jyra Ayita Blake-Waller CSC
Conspicious Service Cross (CSC)
Australian Army
For outstanding achievement as a Nursing Officer deployed with Joint Task Unit 629.2.3 Health Support Unit 1 during Operation COVID-19 ASSIST.

Captain Blake-Waller’s meritorious achievement as a Nursing Officer delivered lifesaving care to vulnerable Australians at the Epping Gardens Aged Care Facility during Operation COVID- 19 ASSIST. Her exemplary and selfless leadership established control of a highly contaminated environment in dire circumstances. Her compassion and devotion to duty delivered outstanding support during Victoria’s second wave and contributed to the community’s confidence in the State Government’s response.

********************************************

Cathy Chye Yah Chong AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Kensington Gardens, South Australia
For significant service to multiculturalism in South Australia, and to the community.

Multicultural Promotion and Advocacy
– Board Member, Adelaide Festival Centre Foundation, since 2018.
– Founding Ambassador, OZAsia Festival, since 2007.
– Founder and President, Sukeenang South Australian Hainan Association, current.
– Member, Women’s Advisory Committee, South Australian Multicultural and Ethnic
Affairs Commission, 2010-2015.
– Deputy Chair, Multicultural Festival of South Australia, 2010-2015.
– President, Chinatown Adelaide South Australia, 2010-2012.

Multicultural Communities Council of South Australia
– Executive Board Member, 2005-2017.
– Former Chair, Women’s Sub-Committee.

Chinese Welfare Services South Australia
– President, 2011-2015, since 2019.
– Treasurer, 2015.

Rotary Club of Adelaide Central (Amalgamated with Adelaide West in 2019)
– President, 2017-2018.
– Chair, Youth Services, since 2018.
– Board Member, since 2014.
– Member, since 2012
.
Rotary International
– Member, since 2013.
Community Other
– Member, Asia Pacific Business Council For Women South Australia, 2013-2014.
– Member, Volunteer Ministerial Advisory Group, South Australian Minister for Small
Business, 2008-2013.
– Member, Alumni of University of South Australia Volunteer Group, 1998-2004.
– Justice of the Peace, since 2011.

BreastScreen SA
– Member Review Steering Committee, 2010-2016.
– Member, State Accreditation Committee, 2013-2015.
– Chair, Consumer Advisory, 2013-2014.
– Member, Consumer Advisory, 2010-2014.
– Former Member, Digital Implementation Review Group.
– Former Member, Digital Breastscreen Implementation.

Health Other
Member, Stakeholder Reference Group, Health Connect, 2008-2016.
– Associate Fellow, Australian College of Health Service Management, 2000.
– Registered Nurse, Royal Adelaide Hospital, 1969-1972.
– Former Director of Nursing, Flinders Medical Centre, Government of South Australia.
– Former Member, Alzheimer’s Consumer Alliance South Australia, Health Consumer Research Partnership.

Awards and recognition include:
– Outstanding Individual Achievement Award, Governor’s Multicultural Awards, Government of South Australia, 2019.
– Paul Harris Fellow, Rotary Club of Adelaide Central.

********************************************

Nathalie Carmen Cook OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Balwyn North, Victoria
For service to dietetics.

Victorian Aboriginal Health Service
– Telehealth Dietitian, since 2020. Banyule Community Health
– Developer, Eat Well, Play Well, since 2006.
– Paediatric and Adult Dietitian, since 2005.

Community Health – Other
– Consumer Representative and Presenter at conferences, Leukaemia Foundation, since 2011.
– Founding Member and Advocate, MPN Alliance Australia, since 2011.
– Member Consumer Representative Panel, Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma
Group, 2016 to 2021.
– Consumer Representative, Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, since 2020.
– Consumer Representative, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, since 2020.
– Consumer Representative, Walter & Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, since
2018.
– Consumer Representative, University of Western Australia, since 2018.
– Consumer Advocate for Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme Listing of Pegylated
INTERFERON, 2011-2018.

Dietetics and Nutrition
– Paediatric Dietitian, Northern Paediatric Clinic, Bundoora, 2015-2017.
– Clinical Dietitian, Austin Hospital, 2004-2006.
– Consultant Dietitian, Wintringham Housing, 1999-2012.
– Clinical Dietitian, Mater Hospital, Brisbane, 1999-2000.
– Clinical Dietitian, Western Hospital, Footscray, 1997-1998.
– Clinical Dietitian, Methodist Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, 1996-1997.
– HIV/AIDS Dietitian and Nutritionist, Nelson-Tebedo Community Clinic, Dallas, Texas,
1996.
– Member, Dietitian Australia, since 1994.

Nursing
– Registered Nurse, Balmain Hospital, 1994-1995.
– Registered Nurse, Calvary Hospital, Canberra, 1992-1994.
– Nurse, Calvary Hospital, Adelaide, 1990-1992.
– Nurse, Caritas Christi Hospice, 1989-1990.
– Nurse, Melbourne Pathology Services, 1987-1989.
– Nurse, St Georges Hospital Melbourne, 1985-1987.
– Student Nurse, St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, 1984-1985.

********************************************

Helen Rosemary Crowe AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Armadale, Victoria
For significant service to urology and oncology nursing, and to professional societies.

Australian Prostate Centre
– Urology Nurse Practitioner, since 2015.
– Clinical Supervisor, Urology and Prostate Cancer Nursing Fellowship Program, since
2015.

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia
– Coordinator, Prostate Care Nurses Induction Program, PCFA, 2017-2019.
– Member, Nursing Working Party, 2009.
– Grant Reviewer, since 2008.

Research
– Urology Research Nurse, Australian Prostate Centre, Epworth Melbourne, 2009- 2018.
– Honorary Urology Research Nurse, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, since 1999.
– Urology Research Nurse, Department of Urology, St Vincent’s Hospital, 1992-1999.

Urology
– Urology Nurse Consultant, Cancer Helpline, Cancer Council Victoria, 1999-2010.
– Developed Abbvie Online Sexual Health in Men with Prostate Cancer Program for
urology nurses, 2018.
– Chair, Australian Zometa Urology Nurses Advisory Board, 2004-2007.
– Urology Nurse Practitioner, private urology practice, since 2008, and Urology Nurse
Clinician, 1992-2007.
– Accredited External Nurse Consultant, Epworth Hospital, Melbourne, 1997-2019.
– Various other nursing roles, 1974-1992.

Education
– Tutor, Male Catheterisation, 5th Year Medical Students, University of Melbourne, 2002-2009.
– Lecturer, Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, 2002-2008.

Australia and New Zealand Urological Nurses Society
– Treasurer, 1996-1998.
– Victorian Representative, 1998-2003.
– Founding Member, 1995.

Victorian Urological Nurses Society
– Chair, 1993-1997.
– Secretary, 1998-2003.
– Founding Member, 1993.

Awards and recognition include:
– Honorary Life Member, Victorian Urological Nursing Society.

********************************************

Mary Duffy AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Bentleigh, Victoria
For significant service to medicine in the field of lung cancer.

Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
– Clinical Lung Cancer Specialist Nurse, since 1990’s.
– Fundraiser, the Weekend to End Women’s Cancers Event, 2015.

Lung Foundation Australia
– Member, Lung Cancer Consultative Group.
– Member, Lung Cancer Conference Organising Committee, 2019.

International Thoracic Oncology Nursing Forum
– Founding Member, since 2009.
– Member, Steering Committee, since 2009.

Lung Cancer Advocacy Other
– Inaugural Chairperson, Australia and New Zealand Lung Cancer Nurses Forum, 2010-2020.
– Member, Lung Cancer Advisory Group, Cancer Australia, 2013-2016.
– Former Member, Kylie Johnston Lung Cancer Network.

Lung Cancer Research
– Presenter, Lectureship Award for Nurses and Allied Health Professionals, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, 2020.
– Research / Presentation, Patients receiving radiation therapy, Barcelona, Spain, 2005.

********************************************

Maxine Duke AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Victoria
For significant service to education, to nursing, and to professional associations.

Deakin University
– Emeritus Professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, since 2020.
– Interim Executive Dean, Faculty of Health, 2019-2020.
– Alfred Deakin Professor, 2016-2019.
– Chair, Nursing Development, 2007-2019.
– Director, Quality and Patient Safety Strategic Research Centre, 2014-2019.
– Head, School of Nursing and Midwifery, 2007-2018.
– Deputy Executive Dean – Health, Faculty of Health, 2012-2018.
– Associate Head of School of Nursing and Midwifery and Coordinator of the Higher

Degree Research Program, 2002-2007.
– Former Chair, Faculty Marketing Advisory Group.
– Former Chair, Student General Misconduct Committee (Health).
– Former Member, Barwon Health Advisory Committee.
– Former Member, Cabrini Advisory Committee.
– Former Member, Epworth Nursing Research Centre Advisory Committee.
– Former Member, Southern Health Advisory Committee.
– Former Member, Barwon Health-Deakin University Liaison Committee.
– Former Member, Epworth HealthCare-Deakin University Steering Committee.
– Former Member, Academic Probation Appeal Committee.
– Former Member, Academic Promotions Committee.

Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council
– Member, Nurse Practitioner Accreditation Committee, 2012-2019.
– Reviewer, Undergraduate Course Accreditation.

Committee and Advisory roles
– Board Member, Victorian Board, Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, since 2019.
– Board Member, Nurses Memorial Centre, since 2018.
– Former Board Member, Australian Council of Deans of Nursing and Midwifery.
– ‘Death over Dinner’ End Life Care Ambassador.
– Former Member, National Clinical Specifications Committee, Health Workforce
Australia.
– Former Member, Nursing and Midwifery Education Planning Group, Victorian
Department of Health.
– Former Member, Cabrini and Deakin Educating Together (CADET).
– Former Member, Collaborative Clinical Education Epworth Deakin (CCEED).
– Former Member, Clinical Placement Fee Implementation Advisory Group,
Department of Health and Human Services.
– Former Member, Safety Innovations in Practice Program Mk 11 Steering Committee,
Epworth Health.
= Former Member, Royal College of Nursing, Box Hill Hospital and St. Vincent’s
Hospital Conference Committee.
– Former Member, Rural Nurses Scholarship Committee.
– Former Member, Southern Health Clinical Placement Network.
– Former Member, Western Health Education and Research Partnership Committee.

La Trobe University
– Former Director of Studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).
– Former Clinical Education Coordinator, Nursing Courses.
– Former Lecturer, School of Nursing.

Publications
– Co-authored over 40 peer reviewed journal articles and six chapters in text books.

********************************************

Valerie Fay Fewster OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Berri, South Australia
For service to community health.

Community Response to Eliminating Suicide, Riverland Community Network
– Chair, Steering Committee, since 2012 with CORES program ( community response to eliminating suicide).
– Workshop Facilitator, Suicide Prevention Program, since 2012.
– Volunteer Educator, Riverland Community Suicide Prevention Network, since 2015.

Friends of the Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Adelaide
– State Council Representative, Chairman, Region 6 (Riverland), since 2014.
– President Local (Berri) Friends Auxiliary for 12 year at various times.
– Volunteer, Berri Friends Auxiliary, since 1995.
– Life Membership, 2021.

Health
– Registered Nurse, working for community District Nursing, 1980-1985.
– Volunteer/Counsellor/Community Educator, Australian Breastfeeding Association,
since 1979.
– Former Registered Nurse and Midwife with Child and Family Health Services, 1985 to
2014.
– Manager, Country North Child and Family Health Team, 1996 and relief manager,
2001-2002.
– Managed and trained Child and Family Health Volunteers in the community to work
with families in their homes or clinic, for 15 years.
– Supported and educated new mothers and toddlers, Gerard aboriginal community, for
20 years.

Community – Other
– Member, Zona Club of the Riverland, for 6 years.
– Former Committee Member, Remark Rose Festival.
– Volunteer, St. Vincent de Paul Society, Berri Conference, since 1986.
– Chairperson, Catholic Women’s League, current and volunteer member, since 1975,
including as Secretary.
– Volunteer, Meals On Wheels, 7 years.
– Volunteer, (supper rounds for patients), Riverland Regional Hospital, 6 years.
– Volunteer, St Mary’s Catholic Parish, co-ordinating and taking communion to elderly
parishioners in their homes, 6 years.

Awards and recognition Include:
– Community Services Award, Zona Club of the Riverland, 2020.
– Community Services Award for role in Child Health Community Nursing, 2002.
– Life Membership, Berri Hockey Club Services, 1981.
– Certificate of Appreciation, Australian Breastfeeding Association, for 40 years service
as a counsellor and educator, 2019.
– Life Membership, Friends Women’s and Children’s Hospital, for 27 years service, 2021.

********************************************

Sandra Louise Grieve OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Guys Forest, Victoria
For service to community health.

Walwa Bush Nursing Centre
– Chief Executive Officer, since 2003.
– Remote Area Nurse, current.
– Nurse Practitioner, since 2006.
– Providing community health services, since 1989.

********************************************

Jill Iliffe AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Victoria
For significant service to nursing through leadership roles with professional organisations.

Professional Nursing Associations
Executive Director, Commonwealth Nurses and Midwives Federation, since 2008.
– Federal Secretary, Australian Nursing Federation, 1999-2008.

New South Wales Nurses and Midwives Federation
– Manager, Professional Services, 1996-1999.
– Professional Development Officer, 1992-1996.
– Councillor, 1985-1989.
– Member, Finance Committee, 1987.
– Elected Trustee, 1990-1991.
– Nurse, since 1978.

Other
– Former Chair, COTA Australia.

********************************************

Alice Guay Kang OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
New South Wales
For service to veterans, and to community health.

Kokoda Track Memorial Walkway
– Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, since 1995.
– Board Member, since 1998.
– Founding Member.
– Foundation Director, The Friends of Kokoda Association.

Concord Hospital
– Director, Marketing and Community Relations, 2013-2020.
– Manager, Marketing and Veteran’s Services, 2001-2013.
– Manager, Veteran’s Liaison Services, 1997-2001.
– Executive Officer, General Managers Unit, 1993-1996.
– Assistant Director, Nursing Bed Management 1989 – 1991
– Assistant Director, Nursing Critical Care Unit, 1984-1988.
– Charge Nurse, 1982-1984.
– Nurse, 1974-1982.

Awards and Recognition include:
– Citizen of the Year, City of Canada Bay, 2017.
– Certificate of Merit, Department of Veterans’ Affairs, 2016.
– Drummoyne Woman of the Year, 2015.

– Paul Harris Fellow, Rotary Club of Concord
– Pride of Workmanship Award, Rotary Club of Five Dock, 2012.
– Pride of Workmanship Award, Rotary Club of Concord, 2009.
– New South Wales Premier’s Public Sector Award, Community Development, Kokoda
Track Memorial Walkway, 2005.
– Centenary Medal, 2001

********************************************

Pamela Hope Mam AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Late of Hammond Island, Queensland
For significant service to the Indigenous community of Queensland through nursing.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane
– Co-Founder, 1973.
– Former Nurse/Manager.
– Facilities Manager, Jimbelunga Nursing Home, 1994-2008.
– Life Member.

Other
– Patron, Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, 2009-2020.
– Former Registerd Nurse and Midwife.

Awards and recognition include:
– Honorary Doctorate, Griffith University, 2018.
– The Aunty Pamela Mam Indigenous Nursing Scholarship (named in honour), Griffith
University, 2015.
– Hall of Fame Inductee for leadership and commitment to improving
health, Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council, 2008.

********************************************

Maxine Veronica Morand AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Victoria
For significant service to the Parliament of Victoria, and to community health.

Parliament of Victoria
– Minister for Children and Early Childhood Development and Minister for Womens Affairs, 2007-2010.
– Member for Mount Waverley, 2002-2010.
– Ministerial Advisor, Minister for Health, 2000-2002.

Professional
Health
– Chief Executive Officer, Breast Cancer Network Australia, 2011-2014.
– Research Scientist, Centre for Behavioural Research, Cancer Council Victoria, 1996-
2000.
– Victorian Transport Coordinator, Austin Health, 1985-1990.
– Senior Staff Nurse, Melbourne Health, 1982-1985.

Governance
– Chair, Mount Hotham Alpine Resort Management Board, 2018 to 2021.
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Board Chair, since 2015.
– Chair, Remuneration Committee, current.
– Member, Research Committee, current.
– Director, Peter MacCallum Cancer Foundation, since 2018.

Community Health
– Board Member, Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes, since 2019.
– Member, Breast Cancer Advisory Group, Cancer Australia, 2012-2014.
– Professorial Fellow, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash
University, since 2016.
– Director, Inner East Community Health Service (now Access Health and Community),
2015-2017.
– Board Member, Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, 2003-2006.

Community
– Patron, Victorian Women’s Football League, 2007-2010.
Awards and recognition include:
– Inductee, Victorian Honour Roll of Women, 2020.

********************************************

Lesley Murphy OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Beaconsfield, Western Australia
For service to community health.

Muscular Dystrophy Western Australia
– Board Member, 2006-2011.
– Community Services Coordinator, 2009-2012.
– Life Member, 2014.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
– Advocate/Fundraiser, 22 years.
– Advocate, Duchenne Disease Register, Department of Health, Western Australia.

Rare Diseases
– Co-Founder and Founding Secretary, Rare Voices Australia, 2011-2016.
– Former Member, National Rare Diseases Working Group; Neuromuscular Diseases
Advisory Group.
– Former Board Member, Muscular Dystrophy Australia.
– Member, Organising Committee, Australian Rare Diseases Symposium, 2010-2011.

Health and Disability
– Former Secretary and Member, Western Electric Sporting Association, 2000.
– Member, Human Genetics Advisory Committee, National Health andMedical
Research Council, 2012.
– Supporter, Every Australian Counts Campaign.

Other
– Volunteer Ambulance Driver, St John Ambulance, Denmark WA, since 2019.
– Primary School Teacher, 1993-2005.
– President and Committee Member, P&C Committee, Willagee Primary School, 1990-
1993.
– Founding Committee Member and President, Defence Childcare Centre, Swanbourne
WA, 1978-1988.
– Registered Nurse and Midwife, 1977-1986.

********************************************

Peter Frederick Mulholland ASM
Ambulance Service Medal (ASM)
Windermere, Tasmania

In 1986, Mr Peter Mulholland commenced with the Metropolitan Ambulance Service in Victoria as a Paramedic, before commencing his employment with Ambulance Tasmania in 1994, where he contributed to several Ambulance Tasmania positions, projects and initiatives.
During his thirty-five-year career, Mr Mulholland has completed education to support ongoing clinical leadership and capability roles. He has attained a Certificate in General nursing, Station Officer Certificate, Air Ambulance Flight Paramedic qualification, a Master in Medical Science and PhD. He also completed a degree in Psychology and was a member of the Critical Incident Stress management team, attending the Port Arthur massacre in 1996. In 1997, he was awarded ‘Individual Excellence in Ambulance Practice’ by the Northern Region of Ambulance Tasmania.
Dedicated to improving Ambulance Service models, Mr Mulholland was involved in the Tasmanian branch of a nationwide research program, examining the practice of rural and regional paramedics. As a result of his research and contributions, he was invited to speak alongside program coordinators at the World Organisation of Family Doctors Conference in Seattle, United States of America.
In 2013, Mr Mulholland commenced as the Project Manager for the pilot of the Extended Care Paramedics within Ambulance Tasmania, where he was instrumental in implementing and managing the Extended Care Paramedic pilot which led to the adoption of Extended Care Paramedic roles within Ambulance Tasmania.
In 2019, in his Branch Station Officer role for Ambulance Tasmania he completed his PhD on inter-professional learning and rural paramedic practice. His Master of Medical Sciences and PhD have since informed the practice of rural paramedics. He has presented at various national and international conferences, and contributed to numerous published works.
Mr Mulholland’s extensive career and ongoing dedication to support and strengthen the paramedicine field and community, make him an honourable recipient of the Australian Ambulance Service Medal.

********************************************

Carmel Bernadette O’Brien OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Barongarook, Victoria
For service to nursing.

Nursing
– Assistant Director of Nursing, Colac Hospital.
– Registered Nurse, Colac Hospital, since 1988.
– Registered Nurse, in a range of locations including Galiwin’ku 2021, 2020,
Kalkaringe, 2019; Wave Hill, 2019; Ardyaloon, 2018 ; Kalumbaru, 2018; Torres Strait: Badu, Bamaga and Mer, 2015, 2016 ; Imampa, 2015 and Alice Springs 2014.
– Lactation Consultant, Breast Feeding Association, 7 years.

Country Fire Authority, Victoria
– Volunteer, Barongarook Rural Fire Brigade, Country Fire Authority, since 2007.
– 10 Year Service Medal, 2017.

The Portsea Camp
– Volunteer Nurse, since 1994.
Associations
– Member, College of Emergency Nursing.
– Member, Council of Remote Area Nurses Australia.
– Member, Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine.

********************************************

Jan Elizabeth Phillips AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Deua River Valley, New South Wales
For significant service to palliative care and oncology nursing.

Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network, Singapore
– Palliative Care Specialist, current.
– Volunteer Teacher, since 2003.
– Mentor and Teacher, Hospis Malaysia, since 2003.
– Member, Training of Trainers Programs – Myanmar, Bangladesh and Bhutan since
2012.

Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Pakistan
– Facilitator, Palliative Care Training and establishment of SKMCH Palliative Care Service.
– Clinical Support Nurse – Oncology and Palliative Care, 1998-2002.

Rachel House, Jakarta, Indonesia
– Mentor and Teacher, since 2009.
– Volunteer, since 2009.

Moruya Oncology and Palliative Care Service
– Nursing Team Member, 1989 – 1998.
– Eurobodalla Breast Cancer Support Service Co-ordinator, 1994 – 1998.
– Justice of the Peace, 1991 – 1998.

Professional Associations
– Fellow, Australian College of Nursing.
– International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care – Traveling Fellow 2003.
– Palliative Care Nurses Australia.

********************************************

Heather Spence OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Cohuna, Victoria
For service to nursing.

Cohuna District Hospital
– Nurse Practitioner, Acute and Supportive Care and Primary Care, since 2018 (Chancellors commendation)
– Postgraduate in Prescribing for Midwives, 2018.
– Victorian Cervical Screening Provider, 2018.
– Accredited Nurse Immuniser, since 2000.
– Clinical Nurse Educator, current.
– TAFE Educator of Medicines and Intravenous Therapy, 2019-2020.
– Associate Nurse Unit Manager, 2003-current.
– Radiology licence – Rural and Remote X-ray operator, 2016.
– ALS, BLS and Neonatal resuscitation Accreditor, current.
– Certificate IV in Training and Assessment, 2007.
– Past Nurse Unit Manager.
– Registered Nurse, since 1985.
– Registered Midwife, since 1988.

********************************************

Merridy Gaye Thompson OAM
Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division
Casula, New South Wales
For service to youth through the Australian Air Force Cadets.

3 Wing Australian Air Force Cadets
– Officer Commanding, since 2020.
– Staff Officer Training, 2017-2020.
– Cadet Representative Group Mentor, current.
– Officer in Charge, Cadet Promotion Courses, over 30 occasions.
– Former Staff Officer Management Services
– Former Finance Accounting Officer
– Former Public Affairs Officer.
– Former Executive Officer.

322 (City of Ryde) Squadron, Australian Air Force Cadets
– Commanding Officer, 1995-2020. Headquarters Australian Air Force Cadets
– Chief of Staff, 80th Anniversary Project, since 2020. Australian Air Force Cadets Other
– Instructor of Cadets, since 1988.
– Former Cadet, No 7 Flight (City of Bankstown).
– Former Instructor, No 22 Flight West Ryde.

Professional
– Senior Workforce Educator, Leadership and Management, South Western Local Health District, since 2019.
– Workforce Development Consultant, Sydney South West Area Health Service, 2015- 2019.
– Nurse Educator, Australian College of Nursing, 2010-2015.
– Nursing Officer, RAAF Specialist Reserve, current.

Awards and Recognition include:
– Commander, Australian Air Force Cadets Commendation, 2008.
– Officer Commanding 3 Wing Australian Air Force Cadets Commendation, 2005.
– Australia Day Medallion, 2012.

********************************************

Marianne Clare Wallis AM
Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia
Gold Coast, Queensland
For significant service to tertiary education, to nursing, and to research.

University of the Sunshine Coast
– Emeritus Professor of Nursing, since 2020.
– Adjunct Professor of Nursing, since 2020.
– Former Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation).
– Professor, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, 2013-2019.
– Associate Dean of Health, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering,
2017-2018.
– Deputy Head of School, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, 2018-2019.
– Deputy Chair and Member, Research Committee, 2013-2019.

Southern Cross University
– Director of Research and Associate Dean of Health Research, School of Health and Human Sciences, since 2020.
Griffith University
– Adjunct Professor, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, since 2014.
– Professor, 2012-2014.
– Foundation Chair, Clinical Nursing Research, 2000-2011.
– Chief Investigator, National Health and Medical Research Council’s Centre for
Excellence in Nursing Interventions for Hospitalised Patient, 2010-2015.
– Chair, Bachelor of Nursing Curriculum Development Committee, School of Nursing
and Midwifery, 2009-2010.
– Program Leader, Clinical Research and Evidence-Based Practice, Centre for Clinical
Practice Innovation, 2003-2006.
– Dean of Health’s nominee, School of Medicine Committee, 2005-2009.
– Member, Postgraduate Courses Review Committee, Faculty of Nursing and Health,
2000-2014.
– Member, Curriculum Discussion Group, Medical School, 2003-2004.
Professional – Other
– Director and Member, Devices and Therapies Group, Alliance for Vascular Access Training and Research Group, 2007-2017.

Australian Catholic University, Sydney
– Member, Research Projects Ethics Committee, 1999-2000,
– Senior Lecturer, 1997-2000.
– Coordinator Postgraduate Nursing Courses, 1993-1996.
– Lecturer, 1989-1997.
– Member, Research and Research Degrees Committee, Faculty of Health Sciences, 1999-2000.
– Member, Master and Doctoral Courses Development Committee, 1998-1999.
– Chair, Postgraduate Standing Committee, School of Nursing, 1993-1996.
– Chair, Graduate Diplomas in Acute Care Nursing Working Party, School of Nursing
and Human Movement 1993-1995.
– Member, Research Committee, School of Education, 1993-1996.
– Member, Research Ethics Committee, 1992-1994.
– Member, Consultancies and Publications Committee, School of Education Research, 1996-1999.

Queensland Health
– Member, Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Committee, 2009-2011.
– Chair, Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Committee, 2007-2009.
– Member, Research and Evidence-Based Practice Sub-Committee, Peak Nursing

Body, 2004-2006.
Gold Coast Health Service District
– Chair, Nursing Research Committee, 2008-2011.
– Member, Integrated Mental Health Service Research Committee, 2000-2002.

Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service
– Visiting Nursing Research Fellow, 2000-2011.
– Chair and Member, Nursing and Midwifery Research Committee, mid-2010s.
– Member, Research Committee, 2013-2016.

Committee and advisory roles
– Member, Scientific Advisory Committee, Queensland Emergency Medicine Research Foundation, 2015-2020.
– Board Member, Academic Liaison, Australian Vascular Access Society, 2015-2017.
– Chair, Research Sub-Committee, Deans of Nursing of Australia Committee, 2002.
– Member, Nursing Research Committee, St Vincent’s Campus, 1997-2000.
– Member, Nursing Research Committee, St George Hospital, 1995-1997.

Health – Other
– Health Education Specialist, Health Ventures, 2011-2013.
– Inaugural Visiting Nursing Research Fellow, St Vincent’s Health Care Campus,
Sydney, 1997-2000.
– Registered Nurse, since 1982.

Charity
– Volunteer, Sunny Street, 2018-2020.
Editorial and Publications
– Member, Editorial Review Panels for thefollowing publications: BMC Nursing; Collegian; Contemporary Nurse; Geriatric Nursing; International Journal of Nursing Practice; International Journal of Nursing Studies; and Journal of Advanced Nursing.
– Author and Contributor, over 200 scientific publications.

Member and Fellowships
– Fellow, Australian College of Nursing.
– Past Member, Australian College of Critical Care Nurses.
– Past Member, Australian College for Infection Prevention and Control.

Awards and recognition include:
– Best Poster Prize, The CEDRiC Project: Care Coordination Through Emergency Department, Residential Aged Care Facility And Primary Health Collaboration, 41st International Healthcare Foundation World Congress. 2017.
– Queensland Premier’s Award for Customer Focus, the Geriatric Emergency Department Intervention, Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service and the University of the Sunshine Coast, 2016.

********************************************

End Notes

Methodology

  1. Using the contraction “nurs”, search each of the 15 PDFs here: www.gg.gov.au/australia-day-2022-honours-list
  2. Weed out those who work in plant nurseries 🙂
  3. Check ambiguities here: www.ahpra.gov.au/Registration/Registers-of-Practitioners.aspx
  4. Drop all titles and arrange alphabetically
  5. Repeat annually

Who Will Collate Next Year’s List?

I’ve been doing this blog post to celebrate nurses/nursing every Australia Day since 2015 (see meta4RN.com/?s=Australia+Day), but this will be the last year for me (see “Beginning of the End“). Why don’t you take over the job next year? As per the methodology above, it’s a pretty easy way to attract a couple of thousand hits in about 48 hours. More importantly, you will help spotlight achievements of nurses without resorting to those cringeworthy hero tropes (see “Batman is a hero. I am a health professional.“).

Change The Date

As I’ve argued since 1994 (see meta4RN.com/changethedate) it’s great that we celebrate the stuff and people that make Australia a good place to live, but it’s ridiculous to do so on 26 January each year.

Missing Anyone?

Please let me know via the comments section below if I missed any Nurses on the 2022 Australia Day Honours List. Naturally, I’m happy to correct any oversights.

Thanks for visiting.

Paul McNamara, 26 January 2022

Short URL: meta4RN.com/Honours2022

Switching Operating Systems

I really like my iPhone. I’ve owned three smartphones – they’ve all been iPhones. I know the iPhone operating system so well that I can work that elegant little machine one-handed in my sleep. Give me any other phone operating system and I will turn into a slow and clumsy boofhead: nothing falls to hand, nothing is intuitive, nothing looks the same.

If I use my iPhone I’m proficient and confident. If I’m handed anything that’s not an iPhone I’m plodding and anxious.

It’s been like that at work this week.

Obligatory PPE Selfie

Queensland is one of the rare places in the world that pretty-much eliminated the COVID-19 pandemic for nearly 2 years. That gave time for every adult Queenslander to receive at least two doses of the vaccine, if they wanted to, before the borders opened and the virus arrived. Baseline data here: meta4RN.com/baseline

As a reminder, Queensland border restrictions have been reduced in steps starting Monday 13 December 2021. Less than a month ago.

What an amazing three-and-a-bit weeks it’s been! As at 13 December 2021 Queensland had accumulated 2176 COVID-19 cases in the 22 months since the start of the pandemic. In less than 4 weeks that number has grown to more than 66,000 [source]. Exponential af. 😳

We all knew a significant rise in cases was coming, but most of us are shocked by how quick and large the explosion has been.

Yes, there was lots of preparation in the lead-up, but it’s been like switching phones/operating systems. Suddenly we’re doing stuff we’re not familiar with yet: nothing falls to hand, nothing is intuitive, nothing looks the same.

We will adapt, of course, but it is understandable that it might take us a little more time. We are comforted to know that we’re not the only service that is struggling. That confirms that we’re not finding things difficult and stressy because we’re a bunch of boofheads. We’re finding things difficult and stressy because we’re in the guts of a crisis.

In my gig (a mental health nurse in a general hospital) sometimes (eg: NOW! 🙂) it’s useful to be informed by a model of care specifically designed for responding to a crisis: psychological first aid (not to be confused with mental health first aid).

Put simply, psychological first aid is a humane, supportive response to a fellow human who needs a hand. Psychological first aid doesn’t require expertise or qualifications, it requires the motivation and capacity to pitch-in to promote calmness, safety, efficacy, connectedness and hope.

That kind and helpful approach, together with revisiting some ideas we had at the beginning of the pandemic, will do for now while we’re adapting. And – for me anyway – it’s probably easier to do that stuff than switching phones/operating systems. 🙂

Psychological First Aid

If you’re interested in learning more about psychological first aid see my prezi [click here] and/or this PDF from Australian Red Cross:

End

Thanks for visiting.

As always, feedback is welcome via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 8 January 2022

Short URL: meta4RN.com/switch

Bonus video: Old bloke shaving

Idea to Tackle Nurse Stereotyping (1993-1994 version)

Once upon a time (1993-1994), I had an excellent idea on how to tackle structural corporate nurse stereotyping.

Here is the story:

Part One: The Concept (letter & illustration, 22/11/1993)

22nd November 1993

The Manager
Uni Foods Pty Ltd

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am a habitual, albeit irregular, user of Nurses Cornflour – it is a product that enjoys vegemite-like status in the kitchen. Indeed, I believe that most Australians would consider their cupboard bare without both of these culinary icons. 

However, I can not help but notice that the packaging of your fine product is outdated in style, and at risk of being construed as a sexist portrayal of who is responsible for cooking and nursing. In these politically correct times, the packaging of any product requires a considered, sensitive approach, so as not to offend. It may well be that sales of Nurses Cornflour are being adversely affected by the packet’s picture of a pretty sponge-holding nurse wearing a cap.

As a male, as a nurse, as an occasional sauce and gravy maker, and as a person who is becoming attuned to the politically correct ideals of the 1990’s, I believe I am well qualified for the position of Nurses Cornflour model/promoter. I have enclosed, for your consideration, a crude facsimile of how my face could be used to lend Nurses Cornflour a more contemporary, less sexist, image.

I look forward to your response to this proposal.

Yours sincerely,
Paul McNamara RGN SPN MRCNA

I looked exactly like this in 1993

Part Two: The Follow-Up (letter, 15/02/1994)

15th February 1994

The Manager
Uni Foods Pty Ltd

Dear Sir/Madam,

I have yet to receive a reply to my letter of 22nd November 1993 (copy enclosed). No doubt, like me, you have been giving this matter some serious consideration over the last few months.

I am sure you would agree that this presents an exciting opportunity to give the image of Nurses Cornflour a profile that will have it being talked about in kitchens and advertising boardrooms all over Australia. Any notoriety I might receive would take a back seat to the sales figures of Nurses Cornflour: it is the latter that should take precedence when considering this matter.

As before, I look forward to your response to this proposal.

Yours semi-sincerely,
Paul McNamara RGN SPN MRCNA

Part Three: The Gentle Let-Down (reply letter, 15/03/1994)

15th March 1994

Dear Mr. McNamara,

Thank you for your letter and illustration of 22nd November 1993 and subsequent letter of 15th February 1994. Our apologies for the delay in responding to your letter.

Whilst we agree that the illustration on Nurses Cornflour could be modified to become more contemporary we respect the concerns of our loyal customers who have grown to know and love that familiar pack.

Please be assured that the packaging is in no way intended to be sexist or stereotypical.

Thus, with respect, we will not be taking up your very kind offer. However, our sincerest thanks for the time you have taken to write to us. We enclose one of our new Continental Easy Meals which we hope you enjoy.

Wishing you all the best in your career.

Regards
CATHY RODDA
Brand Manager – Dry Meal Bases
unifoods 
A division of Unilever Australia Ltd

Idea

Nearly 30 years on, I reckon it’s time for someone else to have another crack at becoming the Nurses Cornflour nurse. The current version is an update from the 1936 version, yet the crisp white uniform and crisp white hat on a crisp white woman remain. 🙄

Please consider this blog post a lighthearted clarion call to challenge nurse stereotypes. Even if you’re unsuccessful, like me, you may receive a free sample in the mail for your trouble. 🙂

End

The twaddle and fluff above is all there is for this blog post. Stumbling across the old letters gave me a nostalgic laugh today – hopefully you have had a bit of a giggle too. 

Paul McNamara, 12 December 2021 

Short URL: meta4RN.com/idea