Tag Archives: social media

A Nurse’s Digital Identity

I am a nurse who uses social media a lot. It is my loudest voice.

If you want to see what a nurse’s digital identity looks like, grab your phone and sus-out this QR code.

My role and ambitions are mid-range. As a student nurse I thought it would be cool to be a Nurse Educator or Clinical Nurse Consultant – I’ve achieved that. I have never aspired to one of those senior management/academic gigs. The downside to that lack of ambition is the limited opportunities to set agendas that drive broad change. In fact, even getting ideas heard or considered is difficult at times.

[insert sound of trumpets going “TooDa-TooDa” here] Social media to the rescue!

And, (this is the main point of this blog post), it is OK for nurses to use social media. Actually, it’s not just OK, USING SOCIAL MEDIA IS RECOMMENDED FOR NURSES AND MIDWIVES.

Don’t believe me?

Read on.

In the ‘National Nursing and Midwifery Digital Health Capability Framework‘ there is a section specifically about being online, as below:

1.3 Digital Identity
Nurses and midwives use digital tools to develop and maintain their online identity and reputation.

This section has four parts – feel free to tweet your favourites 🙂

Digital Identity 1.3.1: Maintains a professional development record demonstrating innovation, reflecting upon skills and experience to help monitor professional identity.

You could use a free app or website for that, for example:

Or just keep it all online via the ANMF Continuing Professional Education portal

Digital Identity 1.3.2: Understands the benefits and risks of different ways of presenting oneself online, both professionally and personally while adhering to the NMBA social media policy.

The policy uses slightly more formal language (read it for yourself here), but can be accurately summarised as “Even if you’re prone to being a dickhead at times IRL, when you’re representing yourself as a nurse online don’t be a dickhead.” If you do be a dickhead online occasionally (to err is human, blah blah blah), be sure to proactively delete and/or apologise.

It is MUCH more simple to keep your private and professional social media identities separate. Create a social media portfolio using the same name on your work name badge/AHPRA registration just for work-related stuff. That’s what I’ve done here linktr.ee/meta4RN Look, I know I’ve overdone it (#tryhard), but that was intentional too. I created the meta4RN social media portfolio at a time when the “prevailing wisdom” (“prevailing ignorance”, more like it 🙄) amongst hospital and university influencers was that social media is bad. Some of these people are still impersonating Grandpa Simpson and shaking their fist at the cloud. And the internet. And social media.

Digital Identity 1.3.3: Understands that online posts can stay in the public domain and contribute to an individual’s digital footprint.

If you want an example of how online posts stay in the public domain, visit/search for The Wayback Machine or Trove (part of the National Library of Australia).

Digital Identity 1.3.4: Recognises that their professional digital footprint, where it exists, should showcase their skills, education, and professional experience.

This is where things like LinkedIn or an online Curriculum Vitae (overdue for an update) come in handy.

Don’t hide your light under a bushel. If you’re a nurse please celebrate your achievements – if we don’t, who will?

My (univited) advice to nurses and midwives is this: Don’t be afraid of social media. Be intentional.

Reference

Australian Digital Health Agency, 2020. National Nursing and Midwifery Digital Health Capability Framework. Australian Government: Sydney, NSW.
nursing-midwifery.digitalhealth.gov.au


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Thanks for visiting the meta4RN.com website/blog. Be sure to use the QR Code above or this link to see other arms of my m̶a̶g̶n̶i̶f̶i̶c̶e̶n̶t̶ m̶e̶t̶a̶4̶R̶N̶ ̶s̶o̶c̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶m̶e̶d̶i̶a̶ ̶e̶m̶p̶i̶r̶e̶ try-hard professional social media portfolio (aka professional digital identity).

As always, your feedback is welcome via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 5 August 2021

Short URL meta4RN.com/ID

Share or Perish!


 

About a decade ago, the old academic refrain to ‘publish or perish’ was updated to ‘be cited or perish’. A couple of days ago we published a paper arguing for a new call-to-arms: ‘share or perish’.

The truth is not too many people are perishing in the academic space. However, there is a pretty good indication that publishing in a journal that has a social media strategy makes a difference.

Want evidence? Have a look at these excerpts from our paper that compares the 18 months before the appointment of a social media editor for the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (IJMHN) with the 18 months after that appointment.

First piece of evidence is in Figure 1 (below). Data from Twitonomy collated in 6‐monthly increments shows that after appointment of an IJMHN social media editor there was a 13½‐fold increase in tweets, and a 16‐fold increase in shared URLs.

Figure 1. Twitter Activity before and after the commencement of IJMHN social media editor on 01/01/17. Data from Twitonomy collated in 6‐monthly increments.

Figure 2 (below) plots 4 different data points. 

It shows that Impressions increased from an average of 118 per day to 2839 per day. That’s a 24-fold increase on how many Twitter accounts potentially saw an @IJMHN Tweet each day. 

Retweets increased from an average 62 retweets every 6 months to over 2140 retweets every 6 months. That’s a 35-fold increase in the number of time @IJMHN Tweets were shared – a remarkable increase in audience reach.

Similarly, the ‘likes’ that @IJMHN attracted increased from 45 times every 6 months to 2083 every 6 months. That’s a 46-fold increase in people acknowledging or showing approval to @IJMHN Tweets.

Most importantly, the number of times people clicked on the link (URL) of an IJMHN paper increased markedly too. It jumped from 129 to 2960 link clicks recorded every six months – a 23‐fold increase.

Figure 2. Twitter Impact before and after the commencement of IJMHN social media editor on 01/01/17. Data from Twitter Analytics collated in 6‐monthly increments.

The final data point I’ll present here is the Altmetric Attention Score (AAS), as shown in Figure 3 (below). The AAS increased from an average of 490 to 1317 every 6 months. This equates to an 169% increase in online attention and activity for IJMHN.

Figure 3. Altmetric Attention Score and Number of Articles published before and after the commencement of IJMHN social media editor on 01/01/17. Data from Altmetric collated in 6‐monthly increments.

Closing Remarks

This simplified summary of the paper misses some of the data and the description of context, the social media strategy and the reporting method. Please see the original paper for more info [link].

Want to find out more about how some of this stuff is measured? Start here: https://wiley.altmetric.com/details/62929297

Please share the link to this blog and/or to our paper about stage one of the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing social media strategy.

Don’t forget: Share or Perish! 

Citation 

McNamara, P. and Usher, K. (2019), Share or perish: Social media and the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, online from 30/06/19, volume and issue yet to be allocated [I’ll update this when it’s in an issue]
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12600
URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/inm.12600 

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As always, feedback is welcomed via the comments section below.

Paul McNamara, 2 July 2019

Short URL: meta4RN.com/share